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  • mongobird
    replied
    N2 is great for purging refrigeration systems, and coming out of a tank it will be dry (no H2O to speak of). At low temperatures it is relatively inert, but the way I think of it is that nitrides nitrates and all that stuff tend to happen at higher temperatures.

    For purging a gas tank or a refrigeration system it is the nuts, but I would only reluctantly use it on SS as a back purge.

    Thanks for the papers, they were good reads.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by blazehaze69 View Post
    The neck ring is blank (customer owned), and the bottle is grey- which sometimes doesn't mean a lot...
    Different suppliers have their own color codes...

    was hoping they left us a clue....

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  • blazehaze69
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Maybe simplistic but effective... reading that tungsten could tell you lot

    ALSO... what color is the bottle..?? and whose name is on the collar..??
    The neck ring is blank (customer owned), and the bottle is grey- which sometimes doesn't mean a lot...

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by blazehaze69 View Post
    Less time consuming and a bit more scientific...
    Maybe simplistic but effective... reading that tungsten could tell you lot

    ALSO... what color is the bottle..?? and whose name is on the collar..??
    Last edited by H80N; 09-11-2015, 09:29 AM.

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  • blazehaze69
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Why not try to TIG with it and see if it is OK or if it eats Tungsten....??
    Less time consuming and a bit more scientific...

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by blazehaze69 View Post
    I thought I'd put this in for the heck of it...

    I bought a tank of Argon from a neighbor. The label was sort of crappy looking, so I thought I'd do a little checking. I ruled out that it was C25 buy bubbling some of the gas into a beaker of distilled water. I checked the pH with a meter my wife had- she's a retired chemist- and the pH remained around 7.0...
    I did the same test with a tank of C25, and the pH went down to around 4.5...
    Why not try to TIG with it and see if it is OK or if it eats Tungsten....??

    Leave a comment:


  • blazehaze69
    replied
    Talking about Argon...

    I thought I'd put this in for the heck of it...

    I bought a tank of Argon from a neighbor. The label was sort of crappy looking, so I thought I'd do a little checking. I ruled out that it was C25 buy bubbling some of the gas into a beaker of distilled water. I checked the pH with a meter my wife had- she's a retired chemist- and the pH remained around 7.0...
    I did the same test with a tank of C25, and the pH went down to around 4.5...

    Leave a comment:


  • OscarJr
    replied
    Not yet, been up-n-down all day today, lol. I'll have a good sit-down tomorrow and read them in their entirety.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by OscarJr View Post
    If I'm correct, the main issue with using Nitrogen as a purging gas is the possibility of the diatomic Nitrogen molecule (N2) coming in contact with the electric arc, presumably if there is a slight gap in the joint. N2 is not soluble in the molten weld pool, but if it comes in contact with the electric arc it dissociates (separates) into monoatomic nitrogen atoms, which are soluble, and diffuse into the weld pool causing nitrogen embrittlement. That's only from what I've read researching the subject.
    Oscar

    did you get a chance to read the "White Papers" that I linked...??
    Last edited by H80N; 09-07-2015, 06:06 PM.

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    If I'm correct, the main issue with using Nitrogen as a purging gas is the possibility of the diatomic Nitrogen molecule (N2) coming in contact with the electric arc, presumably if there is a slight gap in the joint. N2 is not soluble in the molten weld pool, but if it comes in contact with the electric arc it dissociates (separates) into monoatomic nitrogen atoms, which are soluble, and diffuse into the weld pool causing nitrogen embrittlement. That's only from what I've read researching the subject.

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  • blazehaze69
    replied
    Re: N2...

    Very interesting...thanks!

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by blazehaze69 View Post
    I don't believe nitrogen is an inert gas...

    John
    It does displace oxygen though...

    Here is an AWS article worth reading on the subject

    https://app.aws.org/wj/supplement/WJ_1975_01_s12.pdf



    Here is a very good overview of backpurging gasses and techniques

    http://www.boc-gas.com.au/internet.l...e351_68116.pdf

    .
    Last edited by H80N; 09-07-2015, 02:34 PM.

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  • blazehaze69
    replied
    Re: N2...

    I don't believe nitrogen is an inert gas...

    John

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  • pull-do
    replied
    Use to use nitrogen as a purge gas, butt the PEI dept. stopped it, said it caused cracking,,,, never used on the torch, it won't work. The shops use to use the nitrogen because of price, but you have to use more to accomplish the same purge as argon, so it works out in the wash to just use argon, IMHO. Plus you can't use out for nickel base alloys, it won't do the trick.

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  • elvis
    replied
    Much cheaper than argon for purging!!

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