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Measuring Perpendicularity of a Cut

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  • Measuring Perpendicularity of a Cut

    I looking for a quick way to accurately measure the perpendicularity of a cut on round steel tube of different diameters (1" to 4" OD) during production cutting. I haven't found any equipment capable of this except for complex optics and even then there are limitations. Ideally I'm looking for a way to set a round on rollers and rotate it and get an overall run-out of the cut surface or an angle. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7u0Af9dsIADoes anyone know of something that could be used in production?Thanks in advance,-Turbolag

  • #2
    It might be easier to move the indicator rather than the shaft, as the shaft may be inclined to creep either forward or backward from the indicator unless you hold the shaft in some sort of chuck like a pipe threader(even then you will be subject to the accuracy of the drive head). You could mount the indicator on a crank with a movable throw(to change diameters) and use a bushed slide on a pivot to keep the face of the indicator more or less facing the operator.
    ---Meltedmetal

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    • #3
      Originally posted by iloveturbolag View Post
      I looking for a quick way to accurately measure the perpendicularity of a cut on round steel tube of different diameters (1" to 4" OD) during production cutting. I haven't found any equipment capable of this except for complex optics and even then there are limitations. Ideally I'm looking for a way to set a round on rollers and rotate it and get an overall run-out of the cut surface or an angle. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7u0Af9dsIADoes anyone know of something that could be used in production?Thanks in advance,-Turbolag
      What tolerance are you trying to hold? How many pieces are you cutting, is this a one time job or thousands of pieces?
      Richard
      West coast of Florida

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      • #4
        This will be for a few thousand pieces a day and i would like to sample one cut face every 10-15 minutes on each saw. We have a few auto saws that can each be cutting different diameters. It seems like something that other companies would want to measure but there isn't a good way to measure it (other than CMM). Accuracy i would like to see would be at least +-0.0025"

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        • #5
          I guess with those numbers I'd probably have another look at optics. I think people in industry are interested in this type of quality control and the optical industry is answering that call. Don't suppose it's cheap and easy though. How large are your pieces and how easy to manhandle? Is there a better way to cut them for the required accuracy or face them post cut?---Meltedmetal
          ---Meltedmetal

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          • #6
            The best solution I have come up with is an inductive sensor that will measure distance from 0-14mm. It looks just like a small prox switch with a voltage output that equates to some distance. Setting this up on a stand with magnetic V-blocks to hold the piece vertical while sampling the height at 4-6 different locations around the cut face circumference and then taking the Max-Min measurement to find the perpendicularity. This is not ideal but costs a fraction of what optics will. I was just hoping for a more turn-key solution that would be easy for an hourly operator to use repeatably.

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            • #7
              Chuck them in a lathe and use a dial indicator. Even a lathe chuck mounted on bearings would work fine.

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              • #8
                I was thinking of the lathe chuck like walker but would cut them a few thousands over and finih with a lathe but then you have to deal with how to set the depth in the chuck.

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                • #9
                  Yea the chuck/dial concept would be pretty simple and accurate. I like it. I'll let you guys know what we end up doing and how it works out. Thanks for the support!

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