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  • New to welding and going about it DYI

    I inherited my dad's Syncrowave 180SD (220v) a few years ago after he died. It's been sitting in my garage unused ever since because I've never used a welder; couldn't find anywhere local to me to get training and don't know anyone that welds. I've watched some videos and taken some Miller welding courses, but never felt like it provided me with enough where I felt comfortable firing it up on my own without some supervision or at least support... But I own a small horse farm and projects where I could use a welder- specifically TIG- have stacked up to where it's time to through caution to the wind so to speak and get using it. This past weekend, I finally got motivated and my first task was the 220v power. I have a spare 220v wall outlet in the garage and figured it was just a matter of changing the plug to fit the welder. I think I have determined that was my first mistake, thinking it would be that simple... Kind of a funny story with some shocking results, but I'll spare you the details other than to say that although the machine had power and I was able to run through the setup found in the owners manual (which were already set and saved from my dad's use I guess) when I suited up for some practice welds, I could hear the gas and saw the Power light come on when I stepped on the remote pedal, I didn't get an arc. Everything looked to be set up properly (Tungsten, leads, ground, etc). So I figure it must be something I'm missing with the power circuit. That's what led me to the forum, hoping someone could shed light on it, but thought this would also be a good place to get suggestions or advice before I have another go at it. I made some inquiries with local electricians this morning but have not heard back from any of them yet. Should have done that from the get go, but guess I just have to learn things the hard way sometimes... Once the power issues are resolved (assuming that is the problem), I still wish there was a way I could find an experienced welder to help me get started. How do you think it would go over if I stopped at some local shops and just asked if someone would be willing to help me out for some cash or beer? Of maybe just come in on the weekends to help them out when they have some welding to do? I'm trying to do it right, but if all else fails, I'm on my own... My current pressing need is to repair the booms on my tank sprayer that I've broken off. They're pretty cheap 1" square/thin aluminum booms and broke off near the pivot piece that allows them to fold up. I've had them rigged up, but that isn't working out to well and really need to fix them. Lot's of other similar projects to do to. Thanks for the ear and any advice or encouragement appreciated. Patrick (Richmond/Fredericksburg Va. area)

  • #2
    Every welding store near me has a demo/practice/training room just for someone
    like you. Isn't there any dealer you can visit? Bet they would show you a few things
    to get you started. If you are so new to welding I tell you this, you can screw up your
    eyes real good if you flash your eyes (arc light hits your eyes with no protection)

    If you have a auto-darkening helmet it's a good idea to blink your eyes right when the
    arc starts.
    Last edited by bluesky; 06-03-2015, 12:38 AM.

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    • #3
      Welcome to the forum.
      Lincoln A/C 225
      Everlast PA200

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      • #4
        Originally posted by papayne View Post
        I inherited my dad's Syncrowave 180SD (220v) a few years ago after he died. It's been sitting in my garage unused ever since because I've never used a welder; couldn't find anywhere local to me to get training and don't know anyone that welds. I've watched some videos and taken some Miller welding courses, but never felt like it provided me with enough where I felt comfortable firing it up on my own without some supervision or at least support... But I own a small horse farm and projects where I could use a welder- specifically TIG- have stacked up to where it's time to through caution to the wind so to speak and get using it. This past weekend, I finally got motivated and my first task was the 220v power. I have a spare 220v wall outlet in the garage and figured it was just a matter of changing the plug to fit the welder. I think I have determined that was my first mistake, thinking it would be that simple... Kind of a funny story with some shocking results, but I'll spare you the details other than to say that although the machine had power and I was able to run through the setup found in the owners manual (which were already set and saved from my dad's use I guess) when I suited up for some practice welds, I could hear the gas and saw the Power light come on when I stepped on the remote pedal, I didn't get an arc. Everything looked to be set up properly (Tungsten, leads, ground, etc). So I figure it must be something I'm missing with the power circuit. That's what led me to the forum, hoping someone could shed light on it, but thought this would also be a good place to get suggestions or advice before I have another go at it. I made some inquiries with local electricians this morning but have not heard back from any of them yet. Should have done that from the get go, but guess I just have to learn things the hard way sometimes... Once the power issues are resolved (assuming that is the problem), I still wish there was a way I could find an experienced welder to help me get started. How do you think it would go over if I stopped at some local shops and just asked if someone would be willing to help me out for some cash or beer? Of maybe just come in on the weekends to help them out when they have some welding to do? I'm trying to do it right, but if all else fails, I'm on my own... My current pressing need is to repair the booms on my tank sprayer that I've broken off. They're pretty cheap 1" square/thin aluminum booms and broke off near the pivot piece that allows them to fold up. I've had them rigged up, but that isn't working out to well and really need to fix them. Lot's of other similar projects to do to. Thanks for the ear and any advice or encouragement appreciated. Patrick (Richmond/Fredericksburg Va. area)
        Welcome aboard...

        Lots of folks have taught themselves TIG... DIY....

        This TIG Guidelines Booklet will give you the basics..

        http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf

        if you do not already have a copy.. you can download a copy of the manual for your welder here.. just plug in your serial number for the correct version..

        http://www.millerwelds.com/service/ownersmanuals.php

        There is also a lot of good stuff in the TIG resources section..

        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ur-skills/tig/

        That should get you started...
        Last edited by H80N; 06-03-2015, 06:42 AM.
        .

        *******************************************
        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

        My Blue Stuff:
        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
        Dynasty 200DX
        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
        Millermatic 200

        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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        • #5
          Good Videos..

          Once you get your machine setup and settings correct and your material and joints properly prepped... these Aluminum TIG videos by Andy Weyenberg will give you a better understanding of bead and puddle control..

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FadO...e_gdata_player

          BTW... TIG is intolerant of dirt.. crud or corrosion.. unlike some other welding processes... so.............. CLEAN SHINY metal... and clean.. clean.. clean..
          .

          *******************************************
          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

          My Blue Stuff:
          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
          Millermatic 200

          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome! In addition to the great resources H80N listed you will also learn a lot from Jody at weldingtipsandtricks.com.
            Last edited by Aeronca41; 06-19-2015, 09:30 PM. Reason: typo on web link

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