Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is it safe and an acceptable pratice to weld a passenger truck frame?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    H80N, I just looked at the weld training and it looks like possibly advanced welding course that I-car will come in and train.

    There is still a difference between training and actually having a destructive plate test to become a AWS certified welder.

    However, If the class gets into engineering, Its more important to know how engineer the repair.

    I deal with structural engineers all the time because I have to weld on beams and bar joists, cell towers and several structural applications.
    Over the past 26 years I have learned a lot and don't even need a engineer a lot of the time.

    I run across a lot of architects that don't even know how to reinforce beams and bar joists and they can seal drawings ( That is scary )

    Comment


    • #17
      That job was done by a third-world hack (or wannabe). Maybe you can get a third-world crackerjack welder who doesn't care about legal liability to fix it right.
      Miller stuff:
      Dialarc 250 (1974)
      Syncrowave 250 (1992)
      Spot welder (Dayton badged)

      Comment


      • #18
        Maybe y'all can give me the correct terminology here.

        I've repaired broken booms/crowd-arms on smallish excavators, first prepping and welding the immediate break (often with backing plates), then grinding the new welds flush, and adding doublers all around, with long, tapered ends to spread out the loads and avoid hard-points and stress-concentrators, as some of you have described. I have been calling these doublers with tapered ends "fish-plates," but now in checking the definition I find that a fish-plate doesn't have to have the tapered ends. So is there an agreed-on term for a doubler that tapers out?

        (I believe that the welds used when replacing bent/broken sections of tubing in the structure of light aircraft are called "fish-mouth" welds, and the principle for making these welds is similar to what we're talking about, which is why I had thought "fish-plate" might be an okay term . . . ).

        Comment


        • #19
          Old Jupiter, what you are calling a doubler, we call it a fish plate, the square cut fish plates are commonly found in a beam splice, in a house where two beams come together over a post.

          So I'm about 95% sure we are talking about the same thing.

          Comment


          • #20
            Fishplate..

            Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
            Old Jupiter, what you are calling a doubler, we call it a fish plate, the square cut fish plates are commonly found in a beam splice, in a house where two beams come together over a post.

            So I'm about 95% sure we are talking about the same thing.
            Fishplate is the term I was taught... have captured an image off the net and reposted here... NOT my work.. but representative of that type of repair..
            Attached Files
            .

            *******************************************
            The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

            “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

            Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

            My Blue Stuff:
            Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
            Dynasty 200DX
            Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
            Millermatic 200

            TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

            Comment


            • #21
              Thanks H80N, Those are very good examples.

              About 6 months back I was doing some in-depth searching about frame repair and I cant remember the article but the engineer said the vee on a fish plate needs to be 2 to 2-1/2 times longer than the width of the plate.
              So at a minimum, if your fish plate is 12" tall or wide, you would want the taper to be 2' long.

              H80N's example also showed round plug welds which is common in wide fish plates.

              Comment


              • #22
                Okay, we're talking about the same thing, and if fish-plate is common terminology among welders, I'll keep using it. I looked it up before asking the question and learned that the term originated with the railroads a long time ago, meaning the two forged splice-plates that they bolted through each side of some butt-joints of two sections of rail (when they weren't making a thermite-weld, I guess). These plates had square ends. Ref. Wikipedia "fish-plate." I think I generally tend to use "doubler" when it's a plate that needs no tapered end, because of the application.

                FWIW, I first started learning about moving loadings and spreading loadings out with tapering structures in my long-lost youth when I was racing alky-burning outboard hydros. I later read a book by racing engineer Carrol Smith ("Build to Win," IIRC), who made the slightly tongue-in-cheek assertion that, "Machinists love to create stress-risers," by which he meant that they tend to turn shafts of all kinds with pointy-ended tooling that leaves square edges, unless you specify something else. Aircraft industry standard practices, which call for the very lightest weight possible in parts which still have acceptable fatigue-life, have been developed over its hundred-year history.

                Thanks for the info.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Give a monkey a plasma cutter, and he'll turn a Lamborghini into scrap metal.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    there is one thing that no one is talking about, its called, the new steel, by gm. youve seen the chevy truck commercial, the truck is on the ice, then up comes a submarine, busting the ice all to heck, gm is trying to compare their truck frames to ice breaking subs. its more than marketing, its the real deal, body shops have had updates sent to them on, "not to weld" these steels, i have tried to get info from the mfg,s, with no luck. i suspect that this steel is used in suspension and front end steering components, sorta like what this post is about

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Weld, not weld etc there isn't a muffler changer got any business cutting on a truck frame period.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                        Weld, not weld etc there isn't a muffler changer got any business cutting on a truck frame period.
                        Berry

                        you have that right....

                        wonder if Chuckduck ever got any satisfaction on that mayhem committed on his truck??
                        .

                        *******************************************
                        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                        My Blue Stuff:
                        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                        Dynasty 200DX
                        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                        Millermatic 200

                        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X