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Syncrowave 200 problems. Is it me or the machine?

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  • Syncrowave 200 problems. Is it me or the machine?

    Hello and let me start by introducing myself and give a little background info since this is my first post, My name is Denis. I have gotten pretty good with my mig but this is my first attempt at tig welding. I recently picked up a Syncrowave 200 since I've been wanting to start being able to weld aluminum. I got the machine used about 2 weeks ago and was told it had very little use witch looked like it could be accurate by it's physical condition and for the price I couldn't say no. Once I got it home and downloaded the manual for it and I found out there was a timer inside so I went through the sequence and found it only had 6hrs on it witch made me very happy. I tried it on a piece of steel and it worked great but when I got a piece of aluminum to start practicing since that's really what I got it for that's where my problems began. It was very hard or impossible for me to get an ark and puddle started and hard to keep it going. I went to the troubleshooting section in the manual and it said to check the spark gap witch I did and set it to .008. That made it a little better but I still find it hard or impossible to get a puddle to start in low 50-70 amp settings, all I get is cleaning action with a lightning show on the aluminum and no puddle no matter how long I wait. I am using 1/16 green tungsten with a ball on the end and 15 cfh argon with machine set on AC tig. All I am trying to do at this point is to put down some practice beads on a flat piece of aluminum to get the technique down. If I turn up the amps to 150 or more it seems to work as I believe it should by getting a puddle started quickly witch I am able to work with to put down what look like decent welds witch leads to my questions:1. Should it be just as easy to get a puddle started at low amps as it is at high amps? 2. Does the thickness of the material demand higher amps no matter what if all I'm trying to do is practice on a flat piece of aluminum to get the technique down and not concerned about penetration? 3. Could there be something wrong with the machine causing me problems only at low amps and where do I begin and how do I test for what is causing the problem. Any help or pointers would be greatly appreciated. Serial # is LK340104L if that helps.Thanks.

  • #2
    Well, yeah Aluminum dissipates heat real quick, so the thicker you go the more heat you will need, and often times will have to preheat the material. Now a lot of these machines came with crap ground clamps. If it looks crappy it probably is

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply and I'm glad to hear it's probably just my inexperience with aluminum causing my concerns. I will have to try it on a thin piece of aluminum to see how it works. One other thing I noticed and forgot to mention in my previous post is that with the welder pluged in I get a slight tingling feeling when touching the argon cylinder or touch any one of the bolts that holds the welder together. I checked all wires inside to make sure I didn't have any loose grounds or other wires in there while checking gaps and all looked good. Is this normal if I don't run a separate ground wire from the case to earth? Doesn't seem like something dangerous but worth asking just in case.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by turbo87regal View Post
        Thanks for the reply and I'm glad to hear it's probably just my inexperience with aluminum causing my concerns. I will have to try it on a thin piece of aluminum to see how it works. One other thing I noticed and forgot to mention in my previous post is that with the welder pluged in I get a slight tingling feeling when touching the argon cylinder or touch any one of the bolts that holds the welder together. I checked all wires inside to make sure I didn't have any loose grounds or other wires in there while checking gaps and all looked good. Is this normal if I don't run a separate ground wire from the case to earth? Doesn't seem like something dangerous but worth asking just in case.
        if you have not already done so... you might download and read this TIG Guidelines pamphlet...
        It will answer a lot of your basic questions..

        http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf


        Last edited by H80N; 04-10-2015, 08:36 PM.
        .

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        • #5
          The tingling feeling is a hot going to ground, whether to not the cord is frayed somewhere is hard to say. Problem is likely in the plug or receptacle. Something to look at right away though. Now if you were to touch say the welder and a conduit, and your heart stopped, well, there might be a problem.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by H80N View Post
            if you have not already done so... you might download and read this TIG Guidelines pamphlet...
            It will answer a lot of your basic questions..

            http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf


            Thanks for the link. Should help me get through the basics.

            Also will get to work on that wiring issue ASAP since it is clearly dangerous.

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            • #7
              Thanks cruizer my tingling problem is fixed and the issue was in the plug like you said.

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