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  • KS2K
    replied
    Next Diesel Project

    There will be a lot of fab work, welding and plasma on this next project after the Carryall is done.

    www.volvo303.com

    Paul

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  • KS2K
    replied
    Blondie

    The guys I know across the US are into Power Wagons and M-37's. Its
    always a Cummins going into one of these. I know one guy is putting a 6bt in a WC Dodge 6x6. He is having a lot of real estate crunch fit problems. Email me off line and we can talk about conversions. I dont want to wear out my welcome on a welding forum with truck diesel conversions ha!

    Put Power Wagon in the Subject line or it will get automatically dumped.

    Paul [email protected]

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Paul,

    I can see why the Cummins as it is an inline configuration which would work better in a tight spot. I've talked to guys whit Fords with the Power Stroke in them and they love them they are claiming 22 to 24 miles per gallon. A few of them tow 14,000# campers out west and say that they can out pull both the Dodges and Chevy's with diesels in them.

    Cummins makes a good motor don't get me wrong but in my case I want the little more power and will most likely be putting some Gale Banks aftermarket components on it as well. My brother and I have plans to put a Banks kit on his 99 Ram 2500 and if he likes the gains he gets when the 03 is out of warranty he'd like to beef that one up as well. I have however considered a Cummins swap in my Ford but don't know how that might work out with the transfer case and mating the drive shafts to the differentials as my Ford has the independent suspension in the front and Dodges have always used a solid axle.

    As far as making room in my F250 I think there'll be plenty of room to fit the Power Stroke in there and if I have to cut some sheet metal on that truck I really won't mind as it isn't a classic.

    Have you heard of anyone transplanting a Cummins into a Ford and if so how did the swap go?

    Keep on truckin!

    Blondie_486

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  • KS2K
    replied
    Blondie

    I have never used a Power Stroke on a conversion, always Cummins. I dont know the size of the PS, but there is not a lot of room if you dont cut sheet metal.

    Paul

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Paul,

    At any rate you've done a really fine job on the Power Wagon. It's just being a Ford fan I'd have opted for Ford's diesel. Would you have had to cut body metal to get a Power Stroke in it? I've seen a few with 440's in them but it's been a long time ago and can't remember whether they cut any body metal or not to get the "RB" block motors in. I understand your position on cutting body metal especially on vintage stuff.

    I have an 86 F250 that my girlfriend wrecked about a month ago. It's not bad but I do have to fix it and I think when I fix it I'm going to "really fix it". The 351 Windsor has 243,000 miles on it and to do the repairs I'm going to have to pull the engine out so I'm thinking Power Stroke. I've got a line on several of them from a truck salvage yard complete with transmissions, transfer cases, wiring harness and computer. Of course I'll also have to fabricate a set of my body mounts for it, the ones that give anywhere from 2" to 11" of lift, I'm going mild at 2" and I haven't decided about suspension lift yet I'm pondering it since I will have to have beefier front springs to hold the PS diesel up. Duallies are a definite for this truck also, they've been in the plans for it from the beginning. Since the truck will set that high and working on it is an issue I may go with a steel tilt front end too. Who knows at this moment I will have to see what my budget and time will allow and how quickly I have to have it back in service.

    Oh well it does give me an excuse to have to borrow one of my brother's Cummins powered Ram 2500's. They're nice trucks don't get me wrong but I sure am glad they're not mine. Especially after having to put front wheel bearings in one of them last summer. The wheel bearing, rotor, antilock brake sensor assembly (dealer only availibility and as an assembly) cost $675.00 each!!! OUCH!!! and it needed some other things by the time things were all said and done it cost him a little better than 2 grand for a front brake job. I was almost swayed into considering one untill the brake job.

    Well keep up the great work and keep us up to date on the project and when the image event page becomes available.

    Blondie_486

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    This guy is right on, look stock pull like a freight train and probably get better fuel economy to boot. My hats off to you fine sir keep up the great work.

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  • KS2K
    replied
    Blondie

    Ah.......anything could be dropped in...well maybe not a Rolls Merlin ha ha. But in all my conversions I set a hard fast rule. Thou shall not cut and body sheet metal !! I could pull the cummins and drive train and drop the ole 6 cyl gasser right back in. From the outside, it looks all original, till you hit the key, then rumrumrumrumrumrum
    the 6 cyl didnt sound like that.

    Paul

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  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Paul,

    Basically I'm a Ford fan but I do have a soft spot for old Power Wagons. Hmmmm wonder if a Power Stroke could be shoehorned in one? Ah what the heck did I ask that question in here for? Of course we're fabricators we can do it!

    Anyway I just wanted to compliment you on your project from what I can see in the picture it's looking pretty good. I hope you let us know when you get the Image Event page up and running and give us the url I'm sure quite a few of us want to see it!

    Keep on truckin

    Blondie_486

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    I must say that is very cool and I am a Ford guy. Keep us up on the progress. Keep up the good work.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Paul
    very cool project... glad you posted pics.. and glad we could be of assistance...
    take care
    Heiti

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  • KS2K
    replied
    Picture of my Dodge Project

    I have done a few Dodge Power Wagon restorations in the past that were quite straight forward. I wanted a project to stress my welding and fabrication skills and force me to learn new welding skills. In 2002, I bought a 1943 Dodge Carryall. It was more ready for the Dump than anything else. from the front A Post to the rear Tail Gate, everything was rusted away, everything gone. The tail gate weld on both sides, about 2 inches long was all that was holding the entire body. Floor, cross members acutally gone, not there. The body could be racked side to side with 1 finger. It had a permenant rack of 8.250" to the left. I took me over 2 weeks to come up with a course of action. I welded steel angle in X's inside the body to bring it back into true. Then I took my plasma torch and cut the sides out, right below the rear windows. Its a double skin, so the inside panel also was wacked out. All last winter, I hand fabricated all new one piece body panels with compound bends. New cross members out of 2x2" tube were fab'ed. A new floor was fab'ed from 10 ga. Basically from the window line down its all new. The traditional canvas roof was replaced with steel.

    Then I replaced the old 230 cu in 6 cyl with a 1999 Cummins 4BTA, NV-4500 Tranny married to a NP-205 T Case. Saginaw Power Steering, 4 wheel disk brakes, disk E Brake, Timbren Front suspension, ring and pinions changed to 4.89's. A Braden MU-2 Shaft drive winch was added,
    which Dodge used on the Power Wagons. Custom Step Bumper in the rear. Its Painted Harley Davidson Orange and Satin Black. It has 900x16 STA Super Lug tires. It will roll out in the early spring and go to the National Power Wagon Rally in Fairfield Ia. The yellow Power Wagon in the background is also totally resotred. I have one more 1956 Power Wagon that will be started in the fall this year and will be built as a Swivel Frame model. I am in the process of getting a Image Event Page started (when I get some time) so I have no place to put some good pictures.

    Feel free to email me if your working on a Powrr Wagon and need some help or just want to talk Power Wagons.

    Paul (in the Adirondack Mts of NY)
    Attached Files

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    H80N you said it the old Dodges are very tough and well made no speed records but I think that they would climb a building if is was necessary. Hope he posts a picture of it, a Ford guy over here.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Paul
    most folks assume that if it has a rough finish that it is cast iron... but on places of high stress like front spindles etc.. rough or not... is usually forged.. and btw many of those parts are heat treated to boot .. and will need to be again after welding.. do think your stuff is pretty safe though... glad that i could share a little bit of knowledge.. so many smart people put up with me and mentored when i was much younger and "knew everything".. this is a great forum .. because people for the most part want to share knowledge rather than spin bs.. welcome aboard...
    thanks
    Heiti

    and BTW: those wartime Dodges were built with the best engineering and manufacturing knowhow in the world.. as is attested by yours and many others still being out there and active (that was a lot for a chevy guy to say)

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  • KS2K
    replied
    Thanks for the Suggestions

    Never knew about the spark/grinder test. The shock mounts turned out to be a forging not cast. Welded it up today with some nickle high content a friend had. The welds look good. Best of all I learned about determining material with the spark test. Its a good day when you learn a new trick.

    ThankYou
    Paul

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    This is not my specialty but when I needed to blend dissimilar metals on our racecar's axles we had hardened studs, cast Iron, and forged axels. I use Ni99 stick and it has held up very well a full season no breakage but this is not a weight bearing although it keeps the brakes attached to the axle, you decide, weld well

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