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Which type of gas to use? Beginner.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Baktc88 View Post
    yes it is! lol
    COOL,,,,,

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Just Curious...

    is

    "Baktc" for "Back to Sea"......
    yes it is! lol

    Leave a comment:


  • eecervantes83
    replied
    Thanks Ja for the correction.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Just Curious...

    is

    "Baktc" for "Back to Sea"......

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Sometimes "simplified" removes the meaning of the lesson...

    that chart loses the "WHY" as to the use of the various gasses and mixes...

    it is very useful for the weldor to understand at least a little of the physics of the interaction between gas and metals being welded..

    Keep a copy of the manual for reference... no need to swallow all of it in one sitting... that is part of the beauty of having free PDF technical downloads..

    AND...

    as far as tradenames... it seems that the suppliers like the confusion for marketing purposes...

    However... simple solution is yet another Free PDF download... "Cross Reference"....

    http://www.aoc.com.mx/biblioteca/tab...PROTECCION.pdf

    that should remove a lot of the mystery...

    Yea I would like to know why which gas works best with which material and understanding why it is that way! I will download both PDF's! Thanks for the help!

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ja baudin View Post
    Im I missing something? swap your polarity for aluminum? Did you mean flux core wire?
    you are correct...

    maybe his world is flipped ....

    Leave a comment:


  • ja baudin
    replied
    Originally posted by eecervantes83 View Post
    Just give him the dam answers to his questions
    Mig welding.>>
    Stainless steel uses trimix gas.
    Aluminum uses argon. And
    Mild steel uses 75/25 argon co2 mix. .
    On aluminum dont forget to swap your polarity

    Tig all straight argon. 100%


    Im I missing something? swap your polarity for aluminum? Did you mean flux core wire?

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by eecervantes83 View Post
    Just give him the dam answers to his questions
    Mig welding.>>
    Stainless steel uses trimix gas.
    Aluminum uses argon. And
    Mild steel uses 75/25 argon co2 mix. .
    On aluminum dont forget to swap your polarity

    Tig all straight argon. 100%
    You must live in a very simple world...

    too bad the real one is not always that straightforward...

    Leave a comment:


  • eecervantes83
    replied
    Just give him the dam answers to his questions
    Mig welding.>>
    Stainless steel uses trimix gas.
    Aluminum uses argon. And
    Mild steel uses 75/25 argon co2 mix. .
    On aluminum dont forget to swap your polarity

    Tig all straight argon. 100%

    Leave a comment:


  • SdAufKla
    replied
    Certainly no arguments from me. Fundamentals is fundamentals, and understanding the "why" is usually the key to figuring out and solving problems.

    That cross reference .pdf is very nice. Thanks for that link!

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Too Simple to be useful...

    Originally posted by SdAufKla View Post
    Reading the Praxair guide can be like drinking from a fire hose. Also, their proprietary shielding gas names and mixtures can be confusing at first.

    Here's another, more basic discussion with a simplified shielding gas chart that might get you going faster:

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...c-welding.aspx

    Across the top of the table are the welding processes and the column on the left are the common materials.

    HTH,
    Mike
    Sometimes "simplified" removes the meaning of the lesson...

    that chart loses the "WHY" as to the use of the various gasses and mixes...

    it is very useful for the weldor to understand at least a little of the physics of the interaction between gas and metals being welded..

    Keep a copy of the manual for reference... no need to swallow all of it in one sitting... that is part of the beauty of having free PDF technical downloads..

    AND...

    as far as tradenames... it seems that the suppliers like the confusion for marketing purposes...

    However... simple solution is yet another Free PDF download... "Cross Reference"....

    http://www.aoc.com.mx/biblioteca/tab...PROTECCION.pdf

    that should remove a lot of the mystery...

    Leave a comment:


  • SdAufKla
    replied
    Reading the Praxair guide can be like drinking from a fire hose. Also, their proprietary shielding gas names and mixtures can be confusing at first.

    Here's another, more basic discussion with a simplified shielding gas chart that might get you going faster:

    http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us...c-welding.aspx

    Across the top of the table are the welding processes and the column on the left are the common materials.

    HTH,
    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Baktc88 View Post
    Hi, I am new to the site and also to welding. I have a question about which type of gas to use with different materials. How do you know which type of gas to use with a specific metal? Such as stainless steel, or regular steel, and so on? Does it just take experience working with those types of metals that you eventually learn what goes with what? I am confused by this. Thanks a lot and I hope to here from some of you..
    The Praxair Shielding Gas Manual..

    will explain the why's and wherefores of gas selection...

    here is the link to download the PDF..

    http://www.prest-o-sales.com/other_l...n%20Manual.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • Baktc88
    started a topic Which type of gas to use? Beginner.

    Which type of gas to use? Beginner.

    Hi, I am new to the site and also to welding. I have a question about which type of gas to use with different materials. How do you know which type of gas to use with a specific metal? Such as stainless steel, or regular steel, and so on? Does it just take experience working with those types of metals that you eventually learn what goes with what? I am confused by this. Thanks a lot and I hope to here from some of you..
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