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Help with Synchrowave 300

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  • stevedollar
    replied
    Argon hose

    I received the hose and installed it and the gas valve works just fine. I cannot, for the life of me, understand why it wasn't being used.

    Steve

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  • stevedollar
    replied
    Thanks

    Thanks for that spot on information. I already ordered it. I was planning to go to AirGas tomorrow, I'm sure it would have cost a lot more. I went to Lowes today on the off chance. Well, it was an off chance, they had no idea.

    I did check them against Amazon and Amazon carried it but it did not qualify for my Prime free shipping and Amazon was $1 plus higher and that was amazing.

    Thanks again

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by stevedollar View Post
    Is there any good reason someone would not use the valve in the Synchrowave to turn the gas on/off while TIG welding? My machine does not have the gas going thru the valve, it is routed directly to the TIG torch. This is not helpful since one is forced to have the gas flowing all the time while using the welder for TIG. I checked the valve on the bench and it works fine, I checked it in the machine and it appears to be fine. I have not checked the valve operationally as of yet because I don't have another gas line to hook it up. I will get one but, I was just wondering if there was a reason it would be used without the valve?

    Steve
    The only reason that I can think of to bypass the gas solenoid valve would be that it was defective... if the valve is good.. by all means connect it properly with a hose from the regulator to the back of the welder..

    inert gas hoses are pretty inexpensive ... either online or from your LWS
    it will have 5/8-18 RH Male inert gas fittings on either end like this one...

    http://store.cyberweld.com/ingasho6sibl.html

    Leave a comment:


  • stevedollar
    replied
    Synchrowave gas valve

    Is there any good reason someone would not use the valve in the Synchrowave to turn the gas on/off while TIG welding? My machine does not have the gas going thru the valve, it is routed directly to the TIG torch. This is not helpful since one is forced to have the gas flowing all the time while using the welder for TIG. I checked the valve on the bench and it works fine, I checked it in the machine and it appears to be fine. I have not checked the valve operationally as of yet because I don't have another gas line to hook it up. I will get one but, I was just wondering if there was a reason it would be used without the valve?

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by stevedollar View Post
    I was in Philly a week ago yesterday. Fairly cold and windy. I was picking up a new to me band saw. It is an old (1980's) Enco with included blade welder and the unit is in very good condition. Bought if off eBay for an acceptable price.

    Steve
    Good for you...

    sounds like you are equipping your shop well..

    looking forward to hearing of progress and projects..

    even colder here..

    we are located about 200 miles north of Philly.. not too far from Binghamton, NY...

    just waiting on this weekends blizzard and cold snap...
    Last edited by H80N; 02-14-2015, 07:30 AM.

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  • stevedollar
    replied
    I was in Philly a week ago yesterday. Fairly cold and windy. I was picking up a new to me band saw. It is an old (1980's) Enco with included blade welder and the unit is in very good condition. Bought if off eBay for an acceptable price.

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by stevedollar View Post
    I am in Virginia, just outside of Roanoke

    Steve
    Nice area... good weather this time of year...

    not so much here in Ne Pa.... was -8 F here @ 06:00 this morning...

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  • stevedollar
    replied
    I am in Virginia, just outside of Roanoke

    Steve

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  • H80N
    replied
    Steve

    Sounds like you understand the formula

    Am sure you will do fine... and... if/when there are stumbles..
    there are many here willing to give advise to get you extracted from the pickle

    All part of lifes great adventure..

    BTW... what part of the map do you call home these days... I am in NE Pa...

    Leave a comment:


  • stevedollar
    replied
    TIG Practice

    Thanks H80N;

    I have been an engineer for 50 years and now just an old trying to do something I have always admired and loved. I will diligently read and study your links. As I am endeavoring to learn a bit about machinist/welding, it is becoming even more of a journey than I had originally planned. I have a big ole RP lathe and a BP mill and various other old and worn but highly useful pieces. The process is revealing ever more to me how much it is about the hands. As a pencil and computer guy, I never had to do much more than solder and that was a very long time ago. I realize that no matter how many books I read, I still don't have the hands that have the experience of a lifetime of working with these machines. My MIG is acceptable, my gas is sorta OK, my stick has 40 years of unuse to determine and my TIG (you mean it can really look that bad). But my goals are not perfection, just darn good looking beads and being able to weld aluminum.

    According to everything I have seen or heard, the answer is really simple. Practice, practice, practice. A buddy of mine and I are doing our 'class' together so we will some mutual push to get it right.

    Thanks again to all those on the site who contributed and I will be checking in in the future and likely asking more dumb questions.

    I am just amazed at this Miller machine. That thing weighs about 900 pounds when you include the cooler and the pedal and all the wires and cables and its little cart which could haul an elephant. Boy, they sure did make boxes in those days.

    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Nope. I don't care so much for safety... Just don't want a perfectly good welder to blow a board by being installed improperly. But say what you want, it's yours to fry all you want.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by stevedollar View Post
    I appreciate all the help. Yes, it had been wired for 440v and I rewired it to 240V and everything is fine. I did my first TIG and of course it was terrible but done. I had checked with the seller and he didn't know much about the machine but said it had been hooked up as 220V, so much for seller's knowledge. This is a beast of a machine with little use. Those huge transformers are easily changed from one voltage to another. Thanks for the safety natzies also, I realize your concern is for safety and I appreciate that. My knowledge of electrical is actually quite high with many degrees and much experience and I would never knowingly do anything unsafe.
    Sounds like you are on your way to learning TIG

    Here is a booklet that outlines the basics to get you started...

    http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/gtawbook.pdf

    And the Miller TIG resources section..

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ur-skills/tig/

    Also...

    There are lots of excellent TIG videos on Youtube & WeldingTipsandTricks

    PLUS a few suggestions

    Follow the guidelines in the booklet.... there is a reason for them based on physics and experience

    Keep the metal to be welded clean and shiny as TIG has no tolerance for rust, dirt, oil, millscale etc

    Take a little more time and care to insure your joint fitment is tight and neat.... TIG will not easily fill in wide sloppy joints that you may have gotten away with using MIG

    AND.... practice... practice... practice... that will help you to develop the rythm of the TIG dance

    Last edited by H80N; 02-12-2015, 01:01 PM.

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  • stevedollar
    replied
    Thanks

    I appreciate all the help. Yes, it had been wired for 440v and I rewired it to 240V and everything is fine. I did my first TIG and of course it was terrible but done. I had checked with the seller and he didn't know much about the machine but said it had been hooked up as 220V, so much for seller's knowledge. This is a beast of a machine with little use. Those huge transformers are easily changed from one voltage to another. Thanks for the safety natzies also, I realize your concern is for safety and I appreciate that. My knowledge of electrical is actually quite high with many degrees and much experience and I would never knowingly do anything unsafe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Wow. Stop what you are doing. You obviously have no clue what's going on with this machine. Never plug a welder or other heavy machine with out verifying the input wiring. Post your serial number so you can get the manual and some good advice before you cause a really big problem. If you haven't smoked something already. Don't run water or standard automotive coolant in your tig cooler btw.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by stevedollar View Post
    The radiator is finally running fine on outside 110VAC. Put a seal gasket in t he pump and cured the leaks. No problems with now at all. I could not find a serial number anywhere.I could not find a serial number on the welder either. I was told it was made in 1984. I was looking at wiring hookup and it may have been wirred 460V. Hmmm... If so, would that not cause my 110VAC panel to be only 62VAC. Seems that would be since feeding it 220 and if it was expecting 440 then the 110 panel would only be given 63V-Right?Steve
    Later models have a black and white sticker on the back panel with model # and serial #

    older welders like yours largely had the serial numbers stamped into the front panel...

    if it really is 1984 production then you should be finding a a number starting with "JE7XXXXX" or similar... stamped into the front panel... it may be hard to see...

    AND if that is the case.. then this should be the correct manual..

    http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o350m_mil.pdf


    Last edited by H80N; 02-11-2015, 08:06 AM.

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