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  • Desertwolf
    replied
    I have a 625 and love it. Glad I didn't get a smaller machine. I use it for 20 gauge copper to 3/8" steel on a regular basis. It is a very good machine! 1/2" steel is easy, and 1/4" aluminum is like butter.

    BUT YOU MUST HAVE VERY DRY AIR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    If you are not using a Very good air drier, Any machine will be disapointing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rvannatta
    replied
    Originally posted by outkastkustoms
    my next purchase is going to be a plasma cutter i am looking at the SPECTRUM 375, does anyone have this machine? I am going to be cutting 1/4 most of the time, does this cut 1/4 well? I have rented a couple 110 plasma cutters in the past and they were great for sheet metal but I was not real happy with the 1/8 or thicker material, I am not very patient and really want something that will cut fairly quick
    Well we certainly found the spectrum 375 diasppointing for 1/4", but it is really nifty for exhaust pipes.

    We decided to make our next one 'BIG enough' and after thoughtfully considering the specs of the Spectrum 1000 (an 80 amp machine) and thte red box pro-cut 80 ordered up a read box just a couple of days ago. these big ones consume incredible amounts of electric power however. and need some serious review of electric supply issues.

    The 80 amp boxes seem to be all the rage for 2005, and although they will run on single phase, they sort of cry out for a 3 phase service. to run on single phase this unit needs a dedicated 100 amp 230 volt circuit and sort of concluded that we had capacity problems all the way back to the electric meter. since we lack 3 phase on the highline, this in turn led us to the conclusion that we should also put under the christmas tree a 3 phase capable welder with enough umf! to drive the thing and completely bypass the plug in the wall solution.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Spectrum 375

    I have had mine for 6 months and cuts great at 220v, spend the time and a few bucks to convert from 110V, its like night and day. If you are cutting 1/4 daily, go for the bigger machine and avoid frustration and cursing a great plasma cutter for doing a job it is not really designed for.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott V
    George,
    you are going down a slippery slope.
    Just trying to buy what works best for me

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott V
    replied
    Originally posted by Sundown
    Looks like you have email locked out, send me an email with what would you want for it including the shipping to 87111?

    George,
    you are going down a slippery slope.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by dorn
    Sundown, I am selling my Cutmaster 38 w/motorguard filter and 4 extra filters. Only has about 3 hours on it.
    Looks like you have email locked out, send me an email with what would you want for it including the shipping to 87111?

    Leave a comment:


  • cswartz3
    replied
    off topic; maxstar 150 is switchable and gets better power from 240V; just change the plug, white to silver lug for 115V. no open case, a few less screws and its easier to carry a plug with my 2 wheelr running gear than another cord.
    ps they have the funky 90 deg. tangs 115&240V, but are opposite if that makes any sence.

    Leave a comment:


  • dorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Sundown
    I agree my cutter budget will allow for a 30 amp machine, thats it. I did get to try out a Hypertherm 380, a Spectrum 375 , and a Thermal 38 this morning at the dealer. The spectrum and the hypertherm cut about the same, not suprising since they are basicly the same machine except for consumables. The Thermal Cutmaster 38 cut 1/4" better and faster than either of the other two IMO (which may not be valid as I never had one in my hand before ), and I liked the fact you can remove the gun easily when you are not using it. I don't know about the roll cage though, but I guess that dosn't matter. They cost about the same (within a few hundred anyway), if looks were important the Miller would win hands down. Right now I am leaning toward the Thermal, hopefully after Thanksgiving. I did bring home the spec sheets for all three, I can say that I think they are no help at all as they are all over the map even though they are all basicly 30 amp machines and any one of them will do what I need done I think.
    Sundown, I am selling my Cutmaster 38 w/motorguard filter and 4 extra filters. Only has about 3 hours on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by wb5jhy
    outkastkustoms

    I have a Spec 375 and does fine for me. Naturaly I would love to have a Spec 625 or larger but sometimes finances dictate your limits especially when it's just a hobby and not a means for income. It does a decent job on 1/4". The rated 3/8" is slow....but then the 10 inches a minute rating IS pretty slow when you think about it. And yes it will sever 5/8". I've cut up an old three point hitch with it for scraping out without too much trouble.

    One other thing to remember is your air source. Make sure you have enough volume of DRY air for whichever machine you decide on. That was the other reason for going with the 375. If I got the 625, I would have had to buy a larger air compressor too.

    Like other things in life....you always want bigger.
    I agree my cutter budget will allow for a 30 amp machine, thats it. I did get to try out a Hypertherm 380, a Spectrum 375 , and a Thermal 38 this morning at the dealer. The spectrum and the hypertherm cut about the same, not suprising since they are basicly the same machine except for consumables. The Thermal Cutmaster 38 cut 1/4" better and faster than either of the other two IMO (which may not be valid as I never had one in my hand before ), and I liked the fact you can remove the gun easily when you are not using it. I don't know about the roll cage though, but I guess that dosn't matter. They cost about the same (within a few hundred anyway), if looks were important the Miller would win hands down. Right now I am leaning toward the Thermal, hopefully after Thanksgiving. I did bring home the spec sheets for all three, I can say that I think they are no help at all as they are all over the map even though they are all basicly 30 amp machines and any one of them will do what I need done I think.

    Leave a comment:


  • wb5jhy
    replied
    outkastkustoms

    I have a Spec 375 and does fine for me. Naturaly I would love to have a Spec 625 or larger but sometimes finances dictate your limits especially when it's just a hobby and not a means for income. It does a decent job on 1/4". The rated 3/8" is slow....but then the 10 inches a minute rating IS pretty slow when you think about it. And yes it will sever 5/8". I've cut up an old three point hitch with it for scraping out without too much trouble.

    One other thing to remember is your air source. Make sure you have enough volume of DRY air for whichever machine you decide on. That was the other reason for going with the 375. If I got the 625, I would have had to buy a larger air compressor too.

    Like other things in life....you always want bigger.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    I am curious about changing the coord on the Maxstar 150. I have owned and use a STL and now a STH and use it mostly on a 240V (with a 120V to 240V/50 amp pigtail) dedicated curcuit and also on 120V once in a while and have never noticed that it was short on anything. If someone does do that swap I would like to know what happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • dmiller
    replied
    After going the dryer route for awhile, I ran a dedicated welder line in the garage. I put in 50 amp service, slight overkill for future expansion. And I now have an inverter TIG to play with in additon to the 375 and mig. A happy amateur garage.

    Seems there should be a better 30 amp and 50 amp plug than the dryer/flat blade type. I'd like to see a plug that keeps your fingers further away from the big flat energized blades and is easier to pull out push in.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • dmiller
    replied
    I second Hawks suggestions. I certainly doesn't cost much to try it and compare. I used a dryer plug so I could plug it into the dryer high current outlet to see if it helped before running a dedicated line. But my dryer was near the garage and a safe concrete area for sparks. Also the dryer cordeset comes with a molded plug already attached and I was lazy about screwing one on, but the cord is a little stiff. The cord Hawk is suggesting sounds nicer and maybe cheaper and the twistlock plugs are nice. Its not just the plug, its the cord. These things must suck high peaks of short instant currents. The cord has to be a thick enough copper "pipe" to let that flow for maximum power. Either very thick, or very short, or both.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    dorn,

    Just a word of caution. Inverters stay electically hot for a while after switching off the power. Make sure the unit sits awhile before opening it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    dorn,

    I think I would go with at least an 8 gauge wire. I think you will see a marked difference. Let me know. If the range cord does not work out, look at some 8/3 SOOW cord. It is commonly referred to as 8/3 SO cable. It has a smooth flexible rubber like sheath and is 3 conductors of stranded 8 gauge wire. You can put the plug of your choice on it. For 30 amps or less I like the 2 prong (it actually has 3-one is the ground) twist lock plug.

    Leave a comment:

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