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Costa Concordia salvage welders.

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  • Costa Concordia salvage welders.

    i was watching a PPS Program tonight, about the salvage work for this ship off the Italian coast. Afterwards I did a few searches and came across this article. If you scroll down you will see some welders, they are on a slant and welding a huge chunk of metal onto the side of the ship. Looking at the welding machines they are using for the job, they appear to be suitcase models and look like they are using the MIG method. I was thinking that the size of the welders would be rather small for the job in hand.
    One of the machines looks like a Miller, ie Blue, the other two could also be Miller but the Italians like to use their own stuff, just like we do.
    Anyhow, I would have thought that the stick method would have been used on this particular job over Mig
    Somebody out there please teach me and give me their view on what the image is showing.
    It must have been a fascinating job for these men to have been involved in.

    Cheers,
    James.

    http://gcaptain.com/one-year-anniver...sta-concordia/

  • #2
    Originally posted by jmpgino View Post
    i was watching a PPS Program tonight, about the salvage work for this ship off the Italian coast. Afterwards I did a few searches and came across this article. If you scroll down you will see some welders, they are on a slant and welding a huge chunk of metal onto the side of the ship. Looking at the welding machines they are using for the job, they appear to be suitcase models and look like they are using the MIG method. I was thinking that the size of the welders would be rather small for the job in hand.
    One of the machines looks like a Miller, ie Blue, the other two could also be Miller but the Italians like to use their own stuff, just like we do.
    Anyhow, I would have thought that the stick method would have been used on this particular job over Mig
    Somebody out there please teach me and give me their view on what the image is showing.
    It must have been a fascinating job for these men to have been involved in.

    Cheers,
    James.

    http://gcaptain.com/one-year-anniver...sta-concordia/

    Thoose units are feeders. The power source is somewhere else. Also likely they are running self shielded flux core. If things are calm they might run gas shielded cored wire but doubt it. In ship building self shielded wire has replaced stick welding. Production is faster.
    Kevin
    Lincoln ranger 305g x2
    Ln25
    Miller spectrum 625
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    Lincoln 210mp
    F550 imt service truck

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    • #3
      I didn't pay much attn. to the welding but that show is well worth watching. I think Titan is an American outfit.

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      • #4
        http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/spec_sheets/M6-42.pdf

        12vs- RATED 425 A at 60% Duty Cycle
        Ed Conley
        http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
        MM252
        MM211
        Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
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        Miller 125c Plasma 120v
        O/A set
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        You can call me Bacchus

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        • #5
          I thought most shipbuilding nowdays, at least on US naval vessels, was done with dual-shield . . . not true??

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          • #6
            It may be so but this was field work in bad weather, a structural steel job all position etc.

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