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Pulse stick welding with Dynasty

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    You can simply use the tig torch by putting the rod where the tungsten goes.
    Then you have a water cooled handle

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  • JSFAB
    replied
    I've never tried it, but my feeling is if you pulsed a stick weld, you would have all kinds of problems with slag/flux inclusions in the weld.

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  • gnforge
    replied
    Pulse stick welding with Dynasty

    Valid question on gas. The spoolmatic 30A gun has such a trigger, duel stage, pull half way gas pre flows then pull complete arc starts.
    Also u can set a lot of welders pre & post flow and it will do it for you.
    Greg

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  • old jupiter
    replied
    Originally posted by gnforge View Post
    Great minds are the ones that don't accept "can't be done" will not work" never been done before" great minds are willing to fail 1000 times to succeed once in uncharted waters. Sometimes the simple minds are greatest, they didn't know it couldn't be done so they work till they find a way to accomplish the task. Thx Greg
    Oh thank you, Greg, that means I can ask a question from the deep ignorance of my simple and elderly mind! Would it not be an advantage in MIG or even dual-shield welding to have a staged trigger on the gun so that you could pull it partway and get the gas flowing for a second (or however long you want) before you pull it fully on to start the wire? You could also choose to use a little post-flow with such a trigger. Or if you don't like the staged trigger, you could have a thumb-button. Yes, I do understand the drawbacks of added complexity. But I suspect that when you pick up the gun that has been laying on the bench since your previous pass, the shield-gas in the first several inches of the nozzle has been intermixing with and being somewhat displaced by air. So when you pull the trigger on your cold start, the first shot of shield gas contains a lot of air. Maybe that's no big deal . . . but then why do many of the books cite starts as an area in which wire-feed welding is not quite the thing? Might this idea have some value when wire-welding stainless or aluminum? Or am I all wrong about the relatively heavy shield gases containing argon running slowly out of the nozzle when the gun is lying its side, not to mention when it is nozzle-down?
    Last edited by old jupiter; 11-13-2014, 08:28 AM.

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  • gnforge
    replied
    Pulse stick welding with Dynasty

    Great minds are the ones that don't except "can't be done" will not work" never been done before" great minds are willing to fail 1000 times to succeed once in uncharted waters. Sometimes the simple minds are greatest, they didn't know it couldn't be done so they work till they find a way to accomplish the task.
    I always wanted to try stick welding with a foot or thumb control to do the same thing. Not to be used every day but been in many a situation where that range of control would hv saved a lot of time.
    The mind is the greatest of tools if used
    Keep us posted
    Thx Greg

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  • ja baudin
    replied
    Originally posted by cruizer View Post
    Got me on that one. try it, won't hurt anything. really depends on the background voltage ( voltage required to keep the arc going)
    I always thought of welding as a visual art, but never as a Musical art?? I'll have to slow down and listen. Jeez, I may be musically inclined and never new it.

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  • cruizer
    replied
    Got me on that one. try it, won't hurt anything. really depends on the background voltage ( voltage required to keep the arc going)

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  • WillieB
    replied
    Originally posted by cruizer View Post
    I don't know how you'd put the stick function to pulse. I can't see any benifit in doing so anyways. Would not help in build up, perhaps for stick welding really light materials, but the pulse would not be fast enough anyways. Can';t see a real world purpose....
    Musicians have a metronome, a vertical weave timed at maybe 30 pulses a minute, move across at the sag in heat. Might it serve to prevent sag in the filler, even out the deposition rate and avoid crowning in the center of the bead. With a Dynasty 280 DX I think I could use a stinger at TIG settings, Reverse polarity at the Dinse connectors. Would it help in any way? I don't know. One thing I do know, I don't want to damage the welder. Would it? I acknowledge that were it a good idea, greater minds than mine would have thought of it by now.

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  • cruizer
    replied
    I don't know how you'd put the stick function to pulse. I can't see any benifit in doing so anyways. Would not help in build up, perhaps for stick welding really light materials, but the pulse would not be fast enough anyways. Can';t see a real world purpose....

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  • WillieB
    replied
    OK, the subject wasn't worthy of a response.

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  • WillieB
    started a topic Pulse stick welding with Dynasty

    Pulse stick welding with Dynasty

    I just read of pulse stick welding with a TIG welder. Would it work with a Dynasty 280DX? What's the procedure? What are the advantages? It's said it helps with uphill stick.
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