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  • #16
    Does the 350 have auto line? The Dynasty 280 has "auto line" Miller's system that adjusts itself to supply voltage at any point in a range. I want to say the Dynasty works on anything from 198 to 500 volts Three phase uses red white, and black. Single phase uses white and black, tape up red from welder cord. Single phase 208 would work, but I can't think why I would want to use it.
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    • #17
      As I said in the beginning, I'm not a welder. I am not completely familiar with all the in's and out's of Miller's equipment. As you pointed out (in question) the Miller 350 does not operate on 120V.

      There is still 208V to ground regardless of neutral connection. It is simply a matter of how the innerworkings of the welder are setup. It appears my concerns were over nothing.

      It is hooked up 3 phase and working. My problem is solved. Thanks!

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      • #18
        In the case of that Power Wave I got, I suspected correctly that the wild leg was being overutilized from a not-so-beefey transformer and it sensed the voltage out of tolerance and shut down. Yes, the welder had no clue about any other loads in the service and there was no neural hooked to it. But what it DID see is that the phase-to-phase voltage between the L1 and L3 terminals dropped out of tolerance (which wouldn't have mattered if they hadn't hooked the wild leg onto the the L3 terminal as that particular welder sensed voltage between L1 and L3). The problem was due to random single phase loads between the neutral and wild leg and had nothing to do with the service or the welder. This is something that should be taken into account. The wild leg is not a crutch to run everything on and can cause problems particularly if you have single phase motors running (starting) on it. You can't assume the rest of the electrical layout of any place is done using best practices and problems elsewhere can show up with perfectly good equipment connected to the same service. Hence, find out what terminals the control board senses input voltage from and make sure the wild leg is NOT connected to one of those terminals, or if that's not an option, make sure other loads on the service do not cause an out-of-tolerance supply and you'll avoid having things happen like the welder shutting down randomly when a motor kicks on in another part of the building.

        80% of failures are from 20% of causes
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        • #19
          I use a lot of adapters on my stuff when needed. My machines are wired with the wild leg on the red wire. The single phased adapters use the black and white wires.
          I only makes sense to me that a wild leg should be hooked to the only extra wire that is only used for three phase.
          That said.....tester shows it doesn't matter. I still prefer to play it safe.

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          • #20
            Again, in three phase Delta applications there is no wild leg. Thinking of the triangular shape of a delta connection, a volt meter measuring any combination of two of the corners will measure 240 or close to it, each transformer coil provides 240. Such a transformer can supply 240 single phase across any two terminals. We also want to supply 120 volt loads, for this reason we center tap one of the three secondary coils. From this center tap or neutral we can supply 120 volt loads to either end of said coil. Or, from the center tap to the opposite terminal supplies voltage from 1-1/2 of the coils. This provides 208 volt single phase.

            Harbor freight type 120 volt welders use a neutral. I'm not aware of 208, 240 single phase, or any voltage three phase machines being connected to neutral.
            For this reason the welder isn't exposed to a wild leg.

            As has been pointed out many electricians are guilty of load imbalance. Three phase loads are pretty well balanced. Often, all the single phase loads are put on one phase. The odd leg gets less load. uneven loading can cause imbalanced voltage. This can cause problems in motors, and perhaps welders. 5% imbalance in phase voltage can cause big heat build up in motors.
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            • #21
              Originally posted by WillieB View Post
              Again, in three phase Delta applications there is no wild leg. Thinking of the triangular shape of a delta connection, a volt meter measuring any combination of two of the corners will measure 240 or close to it, each transformer coil provides 240. Such a transformer can supply 240 single phase across any two terminals. We also want to supply 120 volt loads, for this reason we center tap one of the three secondary coils. From this center tap or neutral we can supply 120 volt loads to either end of said coil. Or, from the center tap to the opposite terminal supplies voltage from 1-1/2 of the coils. This provides 208 volt single phase.

              .
              You contradict yourself with the first sentence and last sentence.

              Phase b is the "wild" leg or High leg

              http://www.bmillerengineering.com/elecsys.htm
              Ed Conley
              http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
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              • #22
                Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
                You contradict yourself with the first sentence and last sentence.

                Phase b is the "wild" leg or High leg

                http://www.bmillerengineering.com/elecsys.htm
                I don't believe I do. To a three phase load there is no wild leg. To single phase loads center tapped Delta can supply 240 using any combination of A,B,or C. Using the center tap you can get 120 volt or 208 volt. A machine not connected to neutral won't see a wild leg. I don't like the term wild leg. There's nothing wild about it. It is simply 1.5 phase coils from neutral.
                Dynasty 280DX
                Bobcat 250
                MM252
                Spool gun
                Twentieth Century 295
                Twentieth Century 295 AC
                Marquette spot welder
                Smith torches

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                • #23
                  All electrical circuits are round trip to flow current steadily. To test voltage, or potential, the voltmeter has two leads. Connect one lead to any live point, nothing happens. Therefore, it is fair to say voltage or potential is the difference between two conductors. To read 120 or 208 one lead must be on neutral or center tap.
                  Dynasty 280DX
                  Bobcat 250
                  MM252
                  Spool gun
                  Twentieth Century 295
                  Twentieth Century 295 AC
                  Marquette spot welder
                  Smith torches

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by WillieB View Post
                    I don't believe I do. To a three phase load there is no wild leg. To single phase loads center tapped Delta can supply 240 using any combination of A,B,or C. Using the center tap you can get 120 volt or 208 volt. A machine not connected to neutral won't see a wild leg. I don't like the term wild leg. There's nothing wild about it. It is simply 1.5 phase coils from neutral.
                    I'm pickin up what yer layin down now
                    Ed Conley
                    http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                    MM252
                    MM211
                    Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
                    TA185
                    Miller 125c Plasma 120v
                    O/A set
                    SO 2020 Bender
                    You can call me Bacchus

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