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Adding ammeter & voltmeter to old MM200

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  • Adding ammeter & voltmeter to old MM200

    Hi all,I've been lurking around for a few years, but I reckon it's time to join up and get to know some of the wizards on this board.I've got a project in mind for my trusty MM200 (white face)- I'd love to get some feedback from y'all... I'm thinking of installing analog volt- and ammeters in the spot where the optional SKP-35 panel would go... partly because I value as much information and feedback from machines as possible, and partly because I love that MM200 and want to make it a bit classier. I've dug around some of the parts retailers looking for CP-200 meters or similar, with no luck. Anyone here have any ideas? Thanks in advance,Josh

  • #2
    Pointless, unless you look at your meters while welding, even that won't help get your weld right. If you, the welder don't know how your welder is welding, then you've got more problems tan a couple meters will ever help.

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    • #3
      That said , you would need a 0-50VDC direct read volt meter

      A 50MV 0-300 Amp DC shunt, and a 50MV (MilliVolt) 0-300 amp meter

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      • #4
        Thanks for the input- forgive my ignorance here- I've been TIGing for about 6 years and mig welding for only 3- I always wondered why MIGs generally didn't have any sort of V/A readout like my TIG machines. Am I to understand that old MIGs with analog meters like the CP-200/300 didn't display amps (potential) unless they were welding? Obviously the voltage would vary during use, but I suppose I'm not clear on the function of the meters (and the LCD displays on current machines) if they gave no feedback while adjusting settings. To be fair the list of MIG machines I have used: Dahien MIG Boy 135, Miller 211, Eastwood 175(POS) and my MM200. Thanks for the advice/help,Josh

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        • #5
          http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ire-Feed-Speed
          Ed Conley
          http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
          MM252
          MM211
          Passport Plus w/Spool Gun
          TA185
          Miller 125c Plasma 120v
          O/A set
          SO 2020 Bender
          You can call me Bacchus

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          • #6
            Originally posted by squaretaper View Post
            Thanks for the input- forgive my ignorance here- I've been TIGing for about 6 years and mig welding for only 3- I always wondered why MIGs generally didn't have any sort of V/A readout like my TIG machines. Am I to understand that old MIGs with analog meters like the CP-200/300 didn't display amps (potential) unless they were welding?
            From page 15 of
            http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o235r_mil.pdf I would say that the machine would display zero amps when not welding.
            Originally posted by squaretaper View Post
            Obviously the voltage would vary during use,
            Since this is a constant voltage machine, ideally, the voltage will not vary. An ideal "constant voltage" source can support any current. Since no practical device can support any current, no practical constant voltage source is constant at all currents, especially toward the current limit of the system.

            Originally posted by squaretaper View Post
            but I suppose I'm not clear on the function of the meters (and the LCD displays on current machines) if they gave no feedback while adjusting settings. To be fair the list of MIG machines I have used: Dahien MIG Boy 135, Miller 211, Eastwood 175(POS) and my MM200. Thanks for the advice/help,Josh
            If you consider the energy required to melt a certain length of wire. It takes twice as much energy to melt 200 inches of wire as 100 inches. The wire speed has no effect on the required energy.

            energy = power x time.
            power = Volts x Amps.

            Now suppose you keep wire diameter, stickout, voltage, etc., constant and decide to melt 100 inches of wire at 100 inches per minute, and then crank up the speed and melt 100 inches of wire at 200 inches per minute. It would take you one minute to melt that wire at 100 inches per minute and 1/2 minute to melt that wire at 200 inches per minute.

            In the first case: E1 = P1 * 1 minute.
            In the second case : E2 = P2 * 1/2 minute
            But E1 = E2 since the length of wire is 100 inches in both cases. Hence, P2 must be 2xP1. Since the voltage is the same in both cases, the current in the second case must be twice the current in the first case.

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            • #7
              Thanks for the replies- it's this sort of wizardry that cuts through my naive scheming.I'll stop dreaming of analog meters gracing the MM and get down to wiring in the Aico spoolgun I just picked up. Josh

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