Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gooseneck plate to frame... Stick or Mig?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • wmgeorge
    replied
    My guess is the plates are bolted on because they are put on by dealers who don't employ skilled help, skilled as welders anyway. A lot less liability when you just drill and bolt on with factory supplied parts.

    I've seen some pretty [email protected] stick welds, at least I thought so anyway. They have been holding just fine for many years.
    Last edited by wmgeorge; 09-23-2014, 05:22 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • J hall
    replied
    While I would not have used 1" for this, and I wonder about the experience of the OP,

    I have owned four pickups with plates welded to the frame, and never had a crack or any other sign of fatigue. These pickups were in and out of ditches, hauled heavy loads grossing up to 30,000 lbs, etc. you get the picture.

    That being said, my new pickup has a bolted in plate due to lack of room and lots of electronics.

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by elvis View Post
    There is a reason that all the kits bolt on. Let me know when your frame breaks in half.
    ^^^exactly what he said^^^

    Leave a comment:


  • elvis
    replied
    There is a reason that all the kits bolt on. Let me know when your frame breaks in half.

    Leave a comment:


  • fencemaker
    replied
    Disregard my above post, I reread the first post and understand now.

    How many passes with what rod and amperage? Did you take off the bed to do the topside? Pictures?

    Leave a comment:


  • fencemaker
    replied
    Could you describe exactly what you have? A gooseneck "plate" is a 2' by just wider than the frame 3/8 or thicker piece of plate steel with a buildup and 2 5/16 ball in the center that bolts through the sheet metal bed into the frame. I'm assuming by your speech you didn't weld that to the sheet metal. Did you weld a piece of channel on between the frame or something similar?

    Disregard the above, I reread the first post and understand now.

    How many passes? What rod and heat? Did you take off the bed to weld topside? Pictures?
    Last edited by fencemaker; 09-21-2014, 11:58 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • joulian
    replied
    Originally posted by sledsports View Post
    Unfortunately its going to break. Not if... When.

    I don't know..... I have had a 98 Dodge ram 3/4 ton with a plate welded in now for 10 yrs and its actually a 6 inch wide plate ( the new one 8" ) it hasn't shown any signs of breakage. I pull 10,000 lbs plus everytime I hook a gooseneck to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • snowbird
    replied
    HTML Code:
    Unfortunately its going to break. Not if... When.
    +1 add bolts! sleep better!

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Unfortunately its going to break. Not if... When.

    Leave a comment:


  • joulian
    replied
    I guess the 1" would be what A36 and the frame something better t190? maybe? anybody know?

    Leave a comment:


  • joulian
    replied
    I got it. I loaded up dump trailer and 5 cubic yards of top soil and went around the block braking and accelerating. Its ok

    Thanks for the input guys. I was intending on sticking it but someone I know mentioned mig and I started questioning myself... anyway..

    The rods were actually burning into the 1" plate faster than the frame.
    Its on a Dodge 3/4 ton

    Originally posted by eecervantes83 View Post
    Sound like u have no idea what he doing . Just pay and have the gooseneck plate installed by professional.
    Last edited by joulian; 09-21-2014, 04:42 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • eecervantes83
    replied
    Sound like u have no idea what he doing . Just pay and have the gooseneck plate installed by professional.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sandy
    replied
    Normally some preheat would be part of the plan for one inch. Especially when there is such a disparity in thicknesses. Seems like any amp setting high enough to get good depth of fusion on one inch would be likely to turn the relatively thin frame material to crispy bacon like material.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigtow30t
    replied
    Every gooseneck or 5th wheel hitches I've seen are all bolted on. Now if you do weld it on, I would still put a couple of bolts as a mechanical safety

    Leave a comment:


  • fencemaker
    replied
    Bolting it would be a better bet

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X