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18 Ga. Newbee?

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  • #16
    Cleveland . . .

    Has a few places for tools like CNC stuff and big dollar items. Everything I got - the Miller, came from out west, online, like Covell, Creative Billet, Fourner,and E-Bay. It would be nice if there was a place in Ohio.

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    • #17
      Blondie, you can find a english wheel and planishing hammer at the Eastwood company. I recieve a mail order catalog from them and the have many metel working tools.

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      • #18
        Metalshaping tools

        First off if you want expert information about metalshaping, you need to go to www.metalshapers.org. There you will find anything you want to know about working with sheet metal. Topics include welding with gas, MIG, and TIG. Tools, tools and more tools. Hand processes, cutting, shaping, forming, etc.

        Good tool suppliers:

        Metalshaping Tools
        Autobody Hand Tools
        Clay Cook Enterprises
        CNC Solutions: English Wheel Rollers
        Fournier Enterprises
        Gulley Preformance Center
        Irvan-Smith Racing & Fabrication Equipment
        J & S Enterprises: Henrob 2000 Welding & Cutting Oxy-Acetylene Torch
        Kenco Tools
        Metalcraft Tools
        Mittler Brothers Machine & Tool
        Northridge Tool
        Right Angle Tool Division
        Tools Plus
        Trident Tool
        Williams LowBuck Tools Inc.


        I have personally done business with many of these suppliers and know them to be metalshaper friendly.

        Do a search on google for any of the names and they should come up.

        If I were to buy an english wheel right now, I would call Metalcraft Tools. I have one of their baby wheels that would be perfect for motorcycle parts and it is great.

        David

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        • #19
          try blondies idea (it works) proper tunston size, amps, and the biggest thing is your fit up.... tight joints are the key for good tig welding. i used to make those big stainless kitchen hoods 18 304 s.s. we really never used filler rod, unless you make a boo boo......

          we would tack HOT and then lower the heat,

          make sure if you are using c.r.s. CLEAN IT

          and its all about a nice tight seem

          GOOD LUCK

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          • #20
            arcdawg,

            I weld therefore I cannot see.

            Too true.

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            • #21
              hey hawk,

              on the OTHER board they told me to change it (i weld therefore im blind) so as a good little SHEEP i did , i was told that it puts a NEGITIVE LIGHT ON WELDING..... was there a pun in there?

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              • #22
                arcdawg,

                You know I never really considered welding as a "negative image". However, it really is like viewing a negative during the arc time. The base metal at the weld is very dark except at the puddle. I could not say what the rest of the area looks like because I am always watching the puddle regardless of process. When viewed after welding the weld bead is bright by comparison to the base metal. Pun or not-just a "flickering" thought.

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                • #23
                  18 ga.

                  practice on clean pieces take your time and experiment.thats how i learned,be patiant

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                  • #24
                    18 Ga. Newbee

                    There is so much good information sent to you already, just take it all down and try each suggestion until you have a combo that works for you. At work, we're using cored stainless wire on 10 ga stainless sheet, and while the WPS and manufacturer give some great parameter information, I find I have to tinker a bit with the machine to get the right profile and heat input. So I think the key is to keep tinkering. And read as much as you can, and take all the courses you can. I have fairly limited experience in the field, but I find that even those with much more experience still learn each and every day.

                    Speaking of learning, anyone have any suggestions about electrode size and amperage setting for GTAW of 10 ga 316L stainless? Anyone think that 1/8 electrode is cutting it a bit small, or given the character of the metal, and that we are using manual scratch start it will be ok?

                    Thanks for the input.

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                    • #25
                      Humboldt,

                      The 1/8 electrode should be fine. You may want to start around 190Amps and adjust from there.

                      Chopshopchopper,
                      you may have covered this in your classes but a little TIG reminder. Always keep your tungsten clean and grind it on a dedicated wheel LENGTHWISE, not like a pencil. It's amazing how bad a contaminated tungsten will weld.

                      Mojunk is right about the balance. It's an AC function only. If you are doing Aluminum, try it in the green area around 7. This will vary depending on how oxidized the aluminum is. If you need more cleaning, turn it down to a lower number. A few SS brushes is a welcome addition to any weld bench. Just keep the brushes seperate. One for alum. One for steel.

                      A-

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                      • #26
                        Thanks...

                        For all the help. Everyone has helped he out a great deal. The more help I get the better off I'll be thanks a gen. Keep them cumming.

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                        • #27
                          English Wheel

                          Blondie:try this link.
                          http://www.eastwoodco.com/search.asp...=&cat=&SubCat=
                          I hope it opens, if not, go to the Eastwood.com site and hunt for it.
                          G.

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                          • #28
                            learning

                            It is practice practice practice practice and when you get tired practice some more..Get a pile of scrap and weld weld weld until you can get it right..I know you want to get started making money but money is really made when your work speaks to the customer and he goes WOW! I want that guy to weld for me!..Helps if you can take a course or two at the local Vo-tech or find someone who really knows what good work looks like to help you..

                            Teaching yourself can result in getting into some bad habits..learning the good ones about proper seam prep and technique can save you from a future disaster...

                            The guides you recieve are guidelines in setting up your machine..the rest is good technique..:>) Hard? yup but is is really rewarding when your fabrication is so good it hurts to put paint on it..<Grinn>

                            Take Care
                            Grampa
                            Grampa has done so much with so little now I do everything with nothing..;>)

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                            • #29
                              Grampa
                              you put that so very well... and btw.. from your last two lines.... guess you did not need my advice about tig...and automotive sheetmetal restoration... 8*)
                              thanks
                              Heiti
                              .

                              *******************************************
                              The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                              “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                              Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                              My Blue Stuff:
                              Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                              Dynasty 200DX
                              Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                              Millermatic 200

                              TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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                              • #30
                                Actually

                                Heiti,
                                Actually you are a good help..!! I have not welded for over 25 years on a production basis..When I went to the welding supply they have stuff I have never seen before so it has been good to get some help to get this all sorted out..BTW I did find the kit for the red box and will be migging away next week..too bad I threw away all the old fenders around here..Once I get this down then it is on to aluminum and stainless..I was at the swap meet and saw some cracked aluminum motorcyle casing..bet fixing those would be helpful..<GRinnn>

                                Just finding the right stuff has been a caution..I think now I will look for a used Maxstar 200..maybe one with the pulser..automated pulsing sounds real cool for AL..Have to check into that..Just doing my homework so to speak..


                                Thanks
                                Grampa
                                Grampa has done so much with so little now I do everything with nothing..;>)

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