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Anyone gotten cracks in their shops concrete floor from using red heads

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  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
    Tackit, When Cgottosaid said oversized hole in a earlier post I'm pretty sure what he meant was to make sure the hole in the steel plate was at least a 1/6" bigger than the hole that you drill into the concrete, Otherwise the anchor itself will get caught on the steel plate.

    The anchors are a tad bigger than the hole you drill in the concrete.

    Like S Berry said, Do not pilot drill and use a 1/2" bit for a 1/2" anchor.

    Cgotto6, I have never heard of a ROTO Hammer, Here in the big city we call them a Hammer Drill.
    Everything you just said us correct. Thanks for clarifying. Over size the flange hole so the drill bit and anchor both freely pass through. If you do you risk cracking the carbide tip. I have heard them called a hammer drill also, but around here roto hammer is the common name. I wonder if the first one made was branded or named roto hammer? Or us Washingtonians are just nuts haha.

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  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    TxDarth is that a frustrated mechanic hanging from your ceiling in the 1st pic?-Meltedmetal

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  • Portable Welder
    replied
    Tackit, When Cgottosaid said oversized hole in a earlier post I'm pretty sure what he meant was to make sure the hole in the steel plate was at least a 1/6" bigger than the hole that you drill into the concrete, Otherwise the anchor itself will get caught on the steel plate.

    The anchors are a tad bigger than the hole you drill in the concrete.

    Like S Berry said, Do not pilot drill and use a 1/2" bit for a 1/2" anchor.

    Cgotto6, I have never heard of a ROTO Hammer, Here in the big city we call them a Hammer Drill.

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  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Sberry's got it, bit size matches anchor size. It will say on the packaging. These are stocked in all sizes at Home Depot and lowes btw. Don't know if you have either of those near you.

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  • tackit
    replied
    I don't park vehicles or work on vehicles in my shop, it's just a hobby shop, I don't have any cracks in 10 years now. 8" of concrete would be insane for what I do.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    1/2 anchor. 1/2 hole and no pilot needed. Blow the dust out.

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  • TxDarth
    replied
    4 Inch thick seems quite thin for shop floor....my house here in TX built in 2006 has 8 inch thick for the house and my garage (1,800 sq ft) I specified 10 inch and it is poured with a waffle pattern on 3 ft squares at 16 inch thick and it all has rebar. I did this because I had planned to install a lift (8,000 lb capacity) for lifting my cars and pickup (5,600 lb) I have been in here now since Sept 2006 and not one crack.



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  • tackit
    replied
    Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
    Exactly. Good luck with your table. I like to position what ever I am securing in place, with slightly over sized holes than the anchor, then roto hammer right through the flange, pound in the anchor with washers pre installed till it bottoms, then tighten her up. That way there is no chance for misalignment.
    Thanks for the tip Cgotto6. I left a message with the son to see if he has a roto hammer I can borrow. I have to find the anchors tomorrow. I might have to order them. I think I'm going with 1/2 X 3.

    Should I drill a 9/16 hole? I was going to drill a 1/4" pilot hole first then drill the larger hole is that OK? I don't have anytime running a Roto Hammer and don't want to make a mess of it.

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  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Exactly. Good luck with your table. I like to position what ever I am securing in place, with slightly over sized holes than the anchor, then roto hammer right through the flange, pound in the anchor with washers pre installed till it bottoms, then tighten her up. That way there is no chance for misalignment.

    Leave a comment:


  • tackit
    replied
    Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
    The spokesperson at red head is just covering their *ss. They will be plenty sufficient in this application. The epoxy would be like using a semi truck to haul a couple 2x4's. wedge anchors as i have already said are incredibly strong, even pull out. You could even use 1/4" ones probably and never have a problem. 4 @ 5/8 is so overkill it's a joke. And your going into seasoned Crete, which is better for this type of anchor.

    I have had to bed wedge anchors only 2 1/2" due to hydronic heating lines being cast into a slab, and when bolting down the mud sills with my 18" wrench I can practically sink a 1 1/2" diameter washer through a 2x6 if I wanted to do so. They just keep on crushing the more I torque them. I have never pulled an anchor out no matter the size or torque applied.
    Looks like you guys are right. Red Head's chart gives pull out strength on a 3/8 X 2 5/8 Trubolt wedge anchor as 3,469 lbs.

    Last edited by tackit; 04-15-2013, 01:20 PM.

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  • Portable Welder
    replied
    Cgotto6, Your semi truck to haul 2x4s is a perfect analogy.

    Installing concrete achors dont cause your concrete to crack, If you were worried about cracks you should have put rebar in it.

    Forger, What was the wall made out of that you mounted the cross too.

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  • Cgotto6
    replied
    The spokesperson at red head is just covering their *ss. They will be plenty sufficient in this application. The epoxy would be like using a semi truck to haul a couple 2x4's. wedge anchors as i have already said are incredibly strong, even pull out. You could even use 1/4" ones probably and never have a problem. 4 @ 5/8 is so overkill it's a joke. And your going into seasoned Crete, which is better for this type of anchor.

    I have had to bed wedge anchors only 2 1/2" due to hydronic heating lines being cast into a slab, and when bolting down the mud sills with my 18" wrench I can practically sink a 1 1/2" diameter washer through a 2x6 if I wanted to do so. They just keep on crushing the more I torque them. I have never pulled an anchor out no matter the size or torque applied.
    Last edited by Cgotto6; 04-15-2013, 12:37 PM.

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  • Bistineau
    replied
    Originally posted by Wen Valley View Post
    I wouldn't mind a redhead in my shop, not sure what the wife would think though...
    It would probably depend on how fat HE is.

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  • tackit
    replied
    Thanks for the input from all of you, it's much appreciated. I don't care about the cost of the epoxy, it's still a whole lot cheaper than a trip to the Emergency Room. I'll do some thinking on it. Naturally I want to go with the safest but also the easiest solution. thanks again guys.

    So far it sounds like epoxy holds the best, am I right?

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  • Forger
    replied
    I have also used them and others over the years with no problems to speak of,I do use the Hex headed thread style now that 3/8" dia. and larger I use an electric impact on after I predrill the hole.I like them for the reason if you need to remove your item thier is no stud sticking out to trip on and they just look cleaner.Getting ready to set a 15' cross on the side of a church with them in about two hours.I agree that the two part expoxy woul be pricey for this But cracked concrete is sucky.Good Luck

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