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GMAW ( mig ) technique ?

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  • GMAW ( mig ) technique ?

    I would like to hear what everybody is using for GMAW technique,
    in our shop we use a straight forward ( push ) technique for
    the reasoning of lack of fusion issues are comon with the
    "working"/ "whipping" or commonly known as "the trucker shuffle" by some people.
    The plasma arc concentrates heat on the leading edge of the weld thus improving penetration and by whipping the gun back and forth you are taking the heat away from the leading edge which could lead to
    lack of fusion issues.I have seen fillet welds broke open and you
    could see the area where lack of fusion had occurred at the root of the weld, it was like seeing a inclusion every 1/8" to 3/16" along the weld.

    Let's hear why you use the technique you use and on what kind of material thickness, and why you use the specific style. If you
    "work it", is the stacked dimes effect you are looking for ? So is
    it the cosmetics of the weld you are concerned about ?
    What about productivity ?

    Our normal material thickness is 3/16" up to 1/2" carbon steel and on .080" aluminum we also use the push technique all welded in
    the 1F and 2F position.

    Thanks M-light

  • #2
    GMAW Technique

    Hi M-light,

    Good question. I agree with you on the straight forward push technique. It gives sound penetration and a nice smooth bead. There's nothing wrong with that! I do deviate in a couple of situations. I primarily use ER70-S6 bare wire for A36 steel.
    (1) On 1/8" fillets with a tight nozzle fit up I weave a little from side to side. The back side is cherry with good penetration.
    (2) When spray arcing using 92% Argon / 8% Oxygen I work the torch just a little to insure good toe wash.

    I also prefer the straight forward push for aluminum. If you working with .188 and up you can probably stack the bead without burn through.
    I have a buddy who sometimes short arcs aluminum with helium, but that's tough in my book.

    As for the "stacked dimes": well to each his own. I reserve it for the good old 6010 rod on plate or pipe if thickness permits (see attached).

    In summary there's nothing bad about the smooth (unstacked) beads produced by the straight forward torch push. You are getting the results you want: a nice looking structurally sound bead.

    No matter what torch manipulation I always keep the arc in the leading edge of the puddle.

    I hope this does not bore anybody and helps answer your questions.

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    • #3
      GMAW TECHNIQUE

      HAWK NOT BORING JUST GOOD HARD FACTS. THOSE SOLVE PROBLEMS!!!!! I DO THE SAMETHING THE ONLY TIME I WEAVE IS TO HELP KEEP THE HEAT UP ON HEAVY PIECES. GOOD INFORMATION I WISH I COULD HAVE FOUND THIS HELP WHEN I STARTED PISTOL8

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      • #4
        I am almost finished with a fence project. On the fillet welds I drag, but hqalfway through the project I discovered that my butt welds were easier to grind down using the push technique. Only problem with pus is dragging the nozzle on the metal.

        Comment


        • #5
          Push Or Pull

          Originally posted by cope
          I am almost finished with a fence project. On the fillet welds I drag, but hqalfway through the project I discovered that my butt welds were easier to grind down using the push technique. Only problem with pus is dragging the nozzle on the metal.
          Cope,
          I've not experienced that problem on fillets or butt welds. You may have to adjust wire speed a little to get the best results with the push. I have a harder time seeing the puddle on the pull.

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