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Question for any metalurgists who may be lurking here

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  • Question for any metalurgists who may be lurking here

    In my line of work (petro-chemical industry) weld procedures are always given to you before you start to weld. You are told which process and which filler to use and you are given only a very small range of options for choosing how you will do your welding. You don't weld outside of the parameters set forth in the procedure. Failure to comply is grounds for dismissal. Flux core is frowned upon and rarely used. Even when it is used I do not choose my own fillers ... so now that I have recently bought myself a small wire feeder I find I don't know what wire to buy. The machine (211 Autoset) came with a 2 lb. roll of solid wire but I am not interested in the hassle of setting up a bottle every time so I want to use flux core. Obviously I do not mean a dual-shield process wire as that will still require a bottle. I went to Peavy Mart and Crappy Tire and the only self shielding wire I could find at either place is E-71T-11. I bought a little 2 lb spool because I only wanted to try it and see how it runs before I spend money on a larger spool.

    My question is this:
    Does this wire produce a weld with the same mechanical and chemical properties as E7018-H4 (A1)? Is there some other wire that is more appropriate to my needs? I want a wire that is good for dynamic loads. Strong, ductile. Charpy impacts should be the same or better than 7018.

  • #2
    This is an excerpt right out of Lincolns description for it's E7171T-11, NR211-MP..

    "This electrode, and others of the same AWS classification, are not required to deposit weld
    metal capable of delivering any minimum specified Charpy V-Notch (CVN ) properties. It
    should not be used in applications where minimum specified CVN properties are required.
    Typical applications where minimum specified CVN properties are required include, but are
    not restricted to, bridges, pressure vessels, and buildings in seismic zones. The user of this
    product is responsible for determining whether minimum CVN properties are required for
    the specific application."

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    • #3
      OK, thanks. I don't suppose you have a recommendation then?

      Comment


      • #4
        LOL...

        I think if you choose ER71T-11, be prepared to frown.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Dipsomaniac View Post
          LOL...

          I think if you choose ER71T-11, be prepared to frown.
          2nd that notion......get some ar/co2 and 70s-6....you will be very happy...
          bottle and all.......
          More Spark Today Pleasesigpic

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          • #6
            Bottles are not an option.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Matrix View Post
              I have recently bought myself a small wire feeder
              Somehow this doesn't fit with your signature line.

              "I hate welding so much at work that I bought one so I could weld at home!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Of course I'm not a metalurgist, or even a decent welder for that matter, I just like to research my filler choices.

                Unfortunately I'm not aware of any of the choices in FCAW-S that can match the qualities of 7018 point for point. Then there are further limitations when you narrow it down to the .030 to .045 wire sizes only.

                ESAB has a lot of good general info. This link pops up in the middle or tail end of a lesson. You can navigate back and forth from here.

                http://www.esabna.com/EUWeb/AWTC/Lesson7_15.htm

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                • #9
                  Is this an exercise in mental masturbation or is there a need for hi impact wire? We doing critical work with the 211?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sandy View Post

                    ESAB has a lot of good general info. This link pops up in the middle or tail end of a lesson. You can navigate back and forth from here.

                    http://www.esabna.com/EUWeb/AWTC/Lesson7_15.htm
                    Thanks. I'll take a look at it.
                    Last edited by Matrix; 09-29-2012, 03:57 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                      Is this an exercise in mental masturbation or is there a need for hi impact wire? We doing critical work with the 211?
                      I am building an impliment tool that will be subjected to very high vibrational forces and moderate rotational speeds. I want the rotating parts to be tough but not brittle. I need something with enough ductility it can withstand impacts. It's a small machine I am building at home with my own equipment for personal use. So, yah. It's critical to me personally. Thanks for asking.

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                      • #12
                        The reason I ask is often people bring their work experience home with them, the view isn't always,,, accurate for lack of a better word, maybe we could use perspective. A good example is the kid who uses a machine at welding school, thinks a dialarc or better is a must have like he is gonna need to burn 5/32 lo hi for hours on end to build a couple implements for the 23 hp garden tractor.

                        Its just a check, I am a welder by trade and fairly imaginative, my perspective has changed over 35 yrs of this, home built pressing equipment of all kinds, you sound likconscientiousus concerned guy but wouldn'tnt put past some built in overkill. Joints designed with enough connection being a way higher factor than the ultimate weld, etc.

                        Heck, those guysEnglandlend, one of the pipe welders shows up now and then use 6013, ha. You can see the work it takes to bust 18 tacks, for a couple reasons but vs 6010, say using dogs and half clamps where removal is an issue.

                        In this time I cant think of anything Ibeene neen able to scheme up at home where the wecouldn'touldnt have been served with a common electrotendertenede to use 7018 a lot when I see old timers with 10, ha but when I was young impressed by the nice fididn't didnt cost anymore, made your work look good and is about as tuff as it gets.

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                        • #13
                          Feel free to elaborate if I get things wrong, I read the response. Its easy to speculate when we get a question with limited info and I did manage to wait around till someone came up with the link, ha I would bet money you are an expert welder though.
                          I am building an impliment tool that will be subjected to very high vibrational forces and moderate rotational speeds. I want the rotating parts to be tough but not brittle. I need something with enough ductility it can withstand impacts. It's a small machine I am building at home with my own equipment for personal use.
                          I about figured it for this by the nature of the question.
                          So, yah. It's critical to me personally
                          . Sounds about like a rototiller to me? Could have bought a used dc buzzer, probably never had to buy rod again. Back to the original question, after this I don't know anything about it.
                          Last edited by Sberry; 09-29-2012, 05:37 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                            ... Sounds about like a rototiller to me? ...
                            Yah basically. It will operate in a similar way but for a different purpose than tilling and at higher RPM. It's an experiment. It will prolly not work at all and turn out to be the stupidest thing I've ever tried but if it does work it just might be my ticket to early retirement so I'm keeping mum about it for now. You're in the ballpark though.

                            And yah, I can weld.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Matrix,
                              I am going to try and help, please don't be offended.

                              One of the most dangerous things a person can do is take weld procedures from one item and try to apply them to something totally different. What dictates the filler and process used is not only the parts application, but the base material type and state.

                              So my question is....What type of base material will you be using? Please do not respond "stuff from the home depot shelf" you would really need to know the alloy and its current state. Also what thickness ranges are you talking? That is if you truly care about the filler material, that you seem to be stuck on.

                              I have done lots of work for the garage inventor type and I usually get a hearty chuckle out of their questions and weld specs. One time I had a guy try to tell me that it is impossible to mig weld aluminum, because they only tig weld aluminum at work. Hey fine by me. I just charged him the greater price for my time to tig weld 3/8" aluminum. Not my loss, but his.

                              You do realize that farm implements are fix/made/repaired every day with a sick welder and usually what ever rod old Bob has lying around the farm.

                              You talk about high RPM, so I assume you will be dynamically balancing this component as well?

                              "High vibrational forces and moderate rotational speeds" Really what forces are we talking about? Dynamic impact? Excitation forces from rotating imbalance?

                              I have a feeling you should be more concerned about other components in this contraption before you worry if your weld wire is sufficient.
                              Last edited by zachary kling; 09-30-2012, 11:19 AM.

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