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  • spindrift
    started a topic Welder training

    Welder training

    My son and I are investigating schools/programs that offer intensive welder training. By intensive I mean a compressed completion schedule as opposed to what you might find at a tech/voc school. We're located in Central New Jersey just north of Trenton. Any ideas? Thanks.

  • harcosparky
    replied
    I'm probably the last to give advice of this nature, or maybe not.

    I have a son who is currently in a welding program in a Technical High School.

    Just bought him a stick welder so he could burn a lot of rod at home to practice.

    The goal at his school is to pass the AWS test in SMAW, I forget which weld they are going for but it's one of the tougher ones.

    I guess I'd like to add they they just went on a field trip to a local company, a welding supplier if you will, who also runs a welding school.

    Personally I took some courses through the local community college, they were a couple of nights a week for a couple of months. Cost was about $350 and they were very 'informative'.

    Maybe before you son launches into one of the more pricey school option he should look for one like at the community college if for no other reason than to get some exposure to welding.

    WARNING: The following information is only offered as ideas on where to look. I have had no experience with either of these places and cannot speak to their effectiveness or ineffectiveness.


    The school he visited gets around $2,000 per course and you can see their info here ..... http://www.earlbeck.com/training.html

    On the other hand one welding supplier in the region ( MD/DE/NJ ) offers two day courses for under $500 ..... http://www.keengas.com/welding-school/

    Leave a comment:


  • bobhdus
    replied
    I've always heard good things about the Hobart Welding School (HIWT). It may be further than your son may want to travel but they also have online and dvd courses that you can take at the local votech school and still get their diploma's. The key would be having access to a location to practice welding which no matter where you go, your going to have to burn some rods. I get their publications regularly and read a lot of stuff about them in the welding Industry and their supposed to be one of the better schools. They also have accelerated courses.

    Leave a comment:


  • spindrift
    replied
    Thanks. I'll pass along the info.

    Leave a comment:


  • SeanMitch
    replied
    I was like you not too long ago. I was looking for an intensive welding training and it took me quite a long time to find the right one for me. What you need to know first is in what specific area is your son interested in then go from there. There are welding schools that provide intensive training to specific area of expertise. You can check this out and see if this is what you are looking for.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiswoc
    replied
    i took the welding night classes at the middle*** votech in piscataway a couple yrs ago. it was pretty good. now i have my own welders and just burning away. the teacher there are very helpful and a good guy. i was gonna take the aws class there but budget is prohibiting me now. so i'm taking machine shop and autobody class to learn more stuff. iwill prob take the aws class next yr when i can afford it after my mustang project is complete. good luck ps. better hurry up if u wanna sign up. i think classes start sept 12
    Last edited by kiswoc; 09-03-2012, 09:17 AM.

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  • jfk92
    replied
    Originally posted by spindrift View Post
    All sound advice. Thanks guys.
    Speaking with someone last night they mentioned a welding program with middle**** county vocational tech with several class openings currently. There are several locations as well that sounded near you too..... Just FYI

    Ignore the asterisk above, guess there is some word monitoring technology in place that replaced the three letters prior to it!

    Gaaaaafh! Done it again....should be "m i d d l e s e x county"
    Last edited by jfk92; 09-02-2012, 06:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • spindrift
    replied
    All sound advice. Thanks guys.

    Leave a comment:


  • shovelon
    replied
    Originally posted by spindrift View Post
    Please don't assume anything. In this particular case you're dead wrong. If you have something constructive to add to the discussion then by all means continue to follow the thread. And how did you arrive at the conclusion that he wanted to make big bucks...jeez.

    Neither one of us is a professional welder; obviously. My thinking was that the sooner he gain some skill the quicker he would be able to land some kind of a job. What I do know about welding it's that practice, practice, practice is the only way.

    Cruizer, if I thought I had all the answers, I wouldn't have looked for this forum in the first place. I'm trying to help a kid that has no idea as to what direction to go in. Constructive advice would be greatly appreciated.
    From your first post you asked it there is a crash course in welding. Really there are no such things except the rip-off career schools that advertise the world but deliver nothing but debt.

    Some people never get welding. And if you force it on them they hate it. You have to build up slow and in some cases beg for guidance. A lot of the tricks of the trade are inbred in experience. I can teach a monkey to weld but I have to supervise like a school marm all day long. And do you think they repay the favor some day? Most likely not.

    I hire them young and cheap. I go through a fair share of posers before I get one worth bestowing my experience to. And even then a lot of the time they hire on down the street for a couple of dollars more an hour. That is their biggest mistake because now they are on their own. I see bunches of them giving up a few years later because they get burned out on the production line of greed.

    Still I believe it is best to continue school and work welding nights earning minimum wage garnering those golden nuggets of knowlegde working beside a veteran of the industry that knows how to turn a rusty chunk of metal into profit. Then the work will be rewarding in itself, and the money will come.

    Leave a comment:


  • cruizer
    replied
    Well, get him enrolled in the 2 year tech course, then apprentice under a certified/journeyman tradesman.

    There are no easy anwers, nor a quick way to learn this trade.

    Wasn't trying to be sarcastic, just trying to figure out your post.

    Leave a comment:


  • spindrift
    replied
    Originally posted by jfk92 View Post
    Well congratulations to your son for fighting through it rather than throwing in the towel - seems he has learned more from the college experience than just economics - life lessons on digging in and getting it done. I can't say I agree with some others on their surmations of his aspirations to learn quickly and make big bucks custom welding. I think there's an eagerness to get into the environment and learn what appears to be an interest - I can relate. I have yet to weld but came excessively close to spending 4 digits on a machine I have no need for or even know how to use (yet - 14 days and counting till class guys!!! ) on more than one occassion!

    Sounds to me like he should have been an engineer. I was a mechanical engineer out of school - and I worked as a mechanical engineer for about 5 years - then migrated into information technology. Get him onto the board himself - these guys reply because they are good guys and have a LOT to share. Perhaps if he can start a thread about his interests these guys can shed new light on areas he didn't even consider.....a lot of experience with those that have replied - who are 'getting it done' and making a living by it...a lot to receive for free around here!

    Good luck to you and your son ......
    Actually, he started off in the engineering school but couldn't keep his grades up so he had to transfer into Arts and Sciences.

    Thanks for the good wishes.

    Leave a comment:


  • spindrift
    replied
    Originally posted by cruizer View Post
    I'd have to ask his age as well.

    What I get from this is that he wants to learn fast (impossible in a welding trade)

    And then he wants to make huge$$, in specialty welding.

    Best of luck....
    Please don't assume anything. In this particular case you're dead wrong. If you have something constructive to add to the discussion then by all means continue to follow the thread. And how did you arrive at the conclusion that he wanted to make big bucks...jeez.

    Neither one of us is a professional welder; obviously. My thinking was that the sooner he gain some skill the quicker he would be able to land some kind of a job. What I do know about welding it's that practice, practice, practice is the only way.

    Cruizer, if I thought I had all the answers, I wouldn't have looked for this forum in the first place. I'm trying to help a kid that has no idea as to what direction to go in. Constructive advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • jfk92
    replied
    Originally posted by spindrift View Post
    Hobbies? He's a fixer. Always looking for things that are broken and trying to come up with better design ideas for the things that do break.
    Well congratulations to your son for fighting through it rather than throwing in the towel - seems he has learned more from the college experience than just economics - life lessons on digging in and getting it done. I can't say I agree with some others on their surmations of his aspirations to learn quickly and make big bucks custom welding. I think there's an eagerness to get into the environment and learn what appears to be an interest - I can relate. I have yet to weld but came excessively close to spending 4 digits on a machine I have no need for or even know how to use (yet - 14 days and counting till class guys!!! ) on more than one occassion!

    Sounds to me like he should have been an engineer. I was a mechanical engineer out of school - and I worked as a mechanical engineer for about 5 years - then migrated into information technology. Get him onto the board himself - these guys reply because they are good guys and have a LOT to share. Perhaps if he can start a thread about his interests these guys can shed new light on areas he didn't even consider.....a lot of experience with those that have replied - who are 'getting it done' and making a living by it...a lot to receive for free around here!

    Good luck to you and your son ......

    Leave a comment:


  • cruizer
    replied
    I'd have to ask his age as well.

    What I get from this is that he wants to learn fast (impossible in a welding trade)

    And then he wants to make huge$$, in specialty welding.

    Best of luck....

    Leave a comment:


  • spindrift
    replied
    He's 22 and just graduated from Syracuse University with an economics degree. He's the only one of our five kids who shouldn't have gone to a four year college. He absolutely hated it and had an extremely difficult time making it through. I'm very proud of him for persevering the way he did but it was painful for Mom and I to see him struggle the way he did. If it wasn't for his fraternity friends, he would have never made it to graduation.

    Hobbies? He's a fixer. Always looking for things that are broken and trying to come up with better design ideas for the things that do break.
    Last edited by spindrift; 08-29-2012, 02:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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