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  • admweld
    replied
    Field repairs are a whole new ball game.Tossing a shop fabricator into that element especially a pt one with little experience,all i can say is good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    You are right, it is probably disconnected at best, glance when I pass thru my office and peck at the keys. When I write the book I will polish my literary skills. Its amazing I can do this, only reason I made it thru high school was I was good at tests and they wanted rid of me, I might have been slightly less than a positive upstanding influence back in the day.

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  • SundownIII
    replied
    Sberry,

    Man, I don't know if the heat's getting to you, but your responses are getting harder and harder to follow.

    (Not just this thread)

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Never been know for being "politically correct" or "*****footing" around with my responses. With that said...

    If a guy doesn't know the capabilities of a welder (Trailblazer) or what a suitcase feeder (8/12 VS, 8/12 RC) is, then he sure as he11 isn't ready to take his act on the road.

    Having a baby tig and a baby mig and doing "repairs" in his garage sure as heck hasn't prepared him for the type work he's going to encounter "in the field". The sooner some of our newbies get this thru their heads, the better off we'll all be.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
    Not every welder is a genius, remember, half of them are below average in their own profession.
    .
    But don't we have to factor in the thousands of ill prepared guys that start and fail every year...?

    that start out by buying a clapped out Bobcat/Bluestar/SA200.... or whatever.... and dive in with the declaration that they "are a welder" (not weldor, mind you)

    All the while figuring that is all there is to it.....so they will pick the low hanging fruit.. and they will get rich at $20-30 an hour working weekends....figuring they can undercut the other guy because of their "low overhead"...... being... cluesless as to prep, filler, process..... leaving tons of pigeon poop beads behind em.. and wondering how come it ended up being so much work after they quit and lost all that money doing it... then.. sold that engine drive to the next get rich quick guy....



    You don't have to be a genius... but before diving in they ought to have some solid skills and knowledge....

    part of that substandard half is not just the unmotivated blue collar guy... I suspect a good portion is the evening/weekend wannabe.... who might be white collar clerks, programmers, etc... during the day....

    I think I have seen a few thousand of these threads over the years

    Not trying to discourage anybody.... just suggesting that they take things seriously, get skills, knowledge and equipment... It is a professional skill and a business... and should be regarded as such...

    cuz it aint as easy as it looks....

    I think Sundown encapsulated it pretty well.....
    Last edited by H80N; 06-23-2012, 09:32 AM.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    Not every welder is a genius, remember, half of them are below average in their own profession.

    I mention this before, I run in to the carnival guy, full service truck with a new TB and I had to ask. He says, fine machine but wouldn'tnt have wasted the money on the feeder, he said,,, and I side with this, expensive tool box filler. I am not talking about the guys with a need but general equipment repair I am looking for a mechanic with good stick skills in difficult out of position work. The logging equipment repair I mention was a good example, the mechanic before me has some of the right concept but had difficulty executing a quality weld, early failure. Actually the owner had accepted it as part of the wear process which he intended to modify in the future, he realldidn'tnt need to do this if the repair would have been adequate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    there is just so much more to this biz than just buying some equipment.... and going for it... engineering, metalurgy, physics and so much more.....
    Whoops,,, missed that part in shool.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
    kvwall,

    When a guy starts a thread with, "I do light fab and repairs in my garage with my Diversion 180 and ESAB Migmaster 150" and then starts asking questions about an engine drive for "field repairs" the "Oh, Sh1t" sensors go off.

    Then that question is followed by one asking about a small generator and another baby mig.

    No mention of stick welding which is the most common "field" process.

    Not to be harsh (just realistic), but you've got A LOT to learn before you even consider "going mobile". Frankly, if you were qualified to do these repairs, you wouldn't have to ask such basic questions of an internet board.

    Keep in mind that if you are contracted to perform work you may not be capable of performing, not only will you not be asked back, but your BIL (who recommended you) may be looking for a job as well.

    From the questions you've asked, you're a long way from being ready for "prime time". I'd start by buying a buzzbox and burning some rod. Companies don't pay you for showing up on the job for OJT.
    Well put Sundown.....

    there is just so much more to this biz than just buying some equipment.... and going for it... engineering, metalurgy, physics and so much more.....
    the knowledge and experience must be there in the "weldor" to get the job done effectively and safely.....

    not mentioned was bonding and liability insurance as well as criminal culpability if critical welds fail resulting in damage, injury or death....

    AND... expect a SUBSTANTIAL investment in equipment....

    this is not a casual, neanderthal low think endeavor..... too bad most folks do not understand that....

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    kvwall,

    When a guy starts a thread with, "I do light fab and repairs in my garage with my Diversion 180 and ESAB Migmaster 150" and then starts asking questions about an engine drive for "field repairs" the "Oh, Sh1t" sensors go off.

    Then that question is followed by one asking about a small generator and another baby mig.

    No mention of stick welding which is the most common "field" process.

    Not to be harsh (just realistic), but you've got A LOT to learn before you even consider "going mobile". Frankly, if you were qualified to do these repairs, you wouldn't have to ask such basic questions of an internet board.

    Keep in mind that if you are contracted to perform work you may not be capable of performing, not only will you not be asked back, but your BIL (who recommended you) may be looking for a job as well.

    From the questions you've asked, you're a long way from being ready for "prime time". I'd start by buying a buzzbox and burning some rod. Companies don't pay you for showing up on the job for OJT.

    Leave a comment:


  • HayFarmer
    replied
    If you're viewing this as an entry into the field repair business that would make it doable. Having a learning curve isnt a problem in my view. Youll just need to be ready for that. Im sure if youre doing a good job on your BILs work other opportunities could come along. You can develop it as quickly/slowly as you like.

    As for equipment, buying new isnt the only route to getting gear. You can find good used or perhaps demos. I was patient and got my feeder as a demo for very short $. Accumulating gear slowly is likely the best route adding as needs/work arrise. Im sure you know all this tho.

    I wish you the best and would like to know how it goes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    Like i said the joys of field repair work and the only way to learn this is the school of hard knocks and what i have posted here is just a small part of it
    This is worth repeating. This is a stretch from the type of thing you are doing with whole different set of expetations, standards. Even just the nature of concrete cutting, this is likely to be filthy, wet, all position, broken, previously repaired, you name it, likely last minute, last ditch, they aint done anything untill they couldnt help it kind of repair, and that is pretty much the preditcable part. One reason I really never ppipelined was I am not a fan of working in mud (real fear or not,, ha)

    On occasion someone goes in that is just naturally built for this biz, I think Cummins guy on aws might be one. As Killdozer said, he is a really good stick welder, I personally seen a lot of this and I see 1 rod burned and it tells me a lot about the mechanic I got. Can he get a good weld in a hard or imossible spot, I went to one a while back where the guy missed a whole seam becaue he couldnt see it, really just needed a higher level of skill and its not a learn as you go situation.

    A lot of factors in being able to hand a guy a stiff bill and leave him feeling he got the value. Did another one last week that when we get there he is planning on having some kind of fix ,,, like his pal did last time, the laid off welder bud,,, in the same pull for extra hour I fix the problems that cause the problem and I am sure he hated to part with the cash he didnt leave feeling lim,e he got robbed and I am sure after he thinks it over will feel he got an investment grade repair.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    This is an expensive proposition with very little potential for return besides some hard work most retired types don't need. Any ac/dc machine running sticks will likely work. If I had some special app I would fuss over all the stuff but for field work to this day still use sticks and a torch.

    Its different if you are already in this business, have miles of stuff, dozens of hours of weld weekly. Fixing a few pieces of equipment, which usually is as much a mechanic job or more than welding you could never save or make enough to buying everything you see on the shelf.

    If I had it to do it again in todays world, for small repair like this a Miller Maxstar would be my weapon, small genset if I really couldn'tldnt find somewhere to plug in, maybe run the plaz if I had to. So many people trying to make for lack of basic welding skill with equipment, buy a new TB so they can plug in the 211
    .
    O

    Only you know your BIL, how many times they call a welder? 2 or 3 full days a week before I was going to pull the pin on new stuff for that and you never know when its going south. (Hence the low hour mcontinuouslyiniously for sale)

    If the money sitting around on the stump is a minor concern then this crew will be glad to help you off load it as would Miller. If you are retired you could never wear out a new TB.
    Last edited by Sberry; 06-22-2012, 08:05 AM.

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  • BD1
    replied
    Loading: You can use a engine hoist for picking up the Trailblazer. Better yet,
    after you get it build yourself a I-beam gantry for lifting. Then incorporate
    all your goodies on skid. There have been postings here on skid setups.
    http://www.wallacecranes.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • killdozerd11
    replied
    I don't want to be mean or anything but i don't think you really know what your getting into

    Reminds me of the guy hired to be a machinist and work in the tool room with us
    I was the maintenance mechanic

    Guy came in talking the talk and telling us all this and that about stuff he's done
    so dave the tool room foreman tells him sweep the number two mill so he can get started on some parts that need to be made

    Guy goes out the door and comes back a few minutes later with a broom
    at first i thought he was just joking and i had no time pay attention to him i had a fly cutter running on mill No 1 squaring some stock for feeder rails and was cutting a new jack shaft on lathe No 2 at the same time

    So he spent the rest of the day sweeping the floor and cleaning out the waste bins and got his first and last pay check that day

    He was lucky dave didn't boot his butt out the door right after he figured out he had no clue of what he was supposed to do

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  • MMW
    replied
    Is this a hobby thing or are you going to try to make money? Setting up a rig welder is quite expensive for just a few times when your BIL calls you to fix something broken. Don't forget liability insurance.

    The trailblazer is a good machine. As far as accessories that will have to wait until you know what you will need.

    Leave a comment:

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