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Cellulose coated electrode trick

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  • Cellulose coated electrode trick

    I have heard that if you have trouble with sticking a cellulose coated electrode (6010 etc.) that has been partially used, you can dip the end in water and let it dry and it wont stick as easily. I stick stubs all the time while tacking so I think it's worth a shot trying it, but water obviously doesn't sound like a good idea with welding. Thoughts???

  • #2
    i will give it a try, i have small piles of 6011 3/32 on the table, I seem to get about 1/2 of the way thru the rod then it hang nails and sticks if I am not watching for it, funny thing is, 1/8" does not have this problem, same mfg.,hobart.

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    • #3
      Yeah Hobart is what we use. Mainly 1/8 and 5/32. I stick stubs alot with 1/8 but I don't want to try it because of my history with combining welding and water haha.

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      • #4
        I don't know about welding with wet electrodes? but we used to dip 6011 in water and crank up the amps to cut with the arc welder. Like arc air without the air using gravity to clear the melted material. It's very messy and has to be ground after but if you are stuck without a cutting torch it can sometimes be made to work. Definitely not a "recommended" practice.
        Mm
        ---Meltedmetal

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        • #5
          Originally posted by kevin View Post
          i will give it a try, i have small piles of 6011 3/32 on the table, I seem to get about 1/2 of the way thru the rod then it hang nails and sticks if I am not watching for it, funny thing is, 1/8" does not have this problem, same mfg.,hobart.
          I have had issues with rods laying for long time finger nailing, I think if they lay long enough some of the stuff in the coating "settles". As for the sticking I say turn it up 5 and see how it goes, lots of guys try to get control thru the settings and got it pinched down a bit, really welding too cold.

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          • #6
            I usually grind the ends of my electrodes that have been partially used and have had pretty good luck that way. I have a 4 1/2 grinder with a sanding disc on it and grind the end till the coating and electrode are even and then re-use them. I even do this with 7018 that is not ASME certified work.
            Blondie (Owner C & S Automotive)

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            • #7
              Cellulose coated electrode trick

              I only use 6010 for tacking and open root passes. If it is sticking you aren't hot enough or not getting to the correct gap after striking.
              Kevin

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              • #8
                Cellulose coated electrode trick

                7018 is a different story for non critical welds I use a file or scraps the tip of the rod on concrete/asphalt or what ever to clean off the flux overlap and start welding.

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                • #9
                  to you boys who say sticking is due to being too cold, I agree, BUT, try 3/32 6011, it is a whole different beast, I know its the same rod, only smaller, even cranked up, you can only burn about 1/2 of a rod if you try to burn it in one shot, then go to 1/8, they will burn right down to the stub, what gives??????????,,, I,m glad that this was brought up

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                  • #10
                    I don't have a problem running any rod whether it's a stub or not. I just tend to stick most with 6010/6011 stubs. Someone was telling me that the lack of moisture in the flux makes them easier to stick so dipping them in water and letting them dry makes it harder to stick a rod.

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                    • #11
                      You would think though that it would dramatically increase the amount of diffusable hydrogen in that part of the weld making it prone to hydrogen embrittlement. Very crack prone. Just my 2 cents worth.
                      JIM

                      Owner Operator of JNT Mobile Welding & Repair LLC
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                      • #12
                        The purpose of rod ovens and hot boxes is to bake the moisture out of the rod coatings so as to avoid contamination from either oxygen or hydrogen. So putting the rods in water isn't the answer. If you're doing codified work then there is a specification on how hot the rods have to be prior to striking an arc and what length of time they have to be at that temp before using them.

                        Grinding is the best way I've found to use rods that have been struck before. Just let 1/4" of the rod hang over the edge of your bench and take a 60 grit or finer sanding disc on a small grinder and grind the burnt part off the rod. It works just fine.
                        Blondie (Owner C & S Automotive)

                        Colt the original point & click interface!

                        Millermatic 35 with spot panel
                        Miller 340A/BP
                        Victor O/A torches
                        Lincoln SP125
                        Too many other tools to list

                        03 Ram 1500
                        78 GS1000
                        82 GL1100 Interstate

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                        • #13
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                          • #14
                            Not all rods are sposed to be stored in an oven, they can get too dry I think. Mostly they get a unshielded stop, there is a goober of oxidized wire on the end. Cleaning it couldn't hurt but most guys get the instinct to long arc for a split second to get going again, there is an occasion I bang a 7018 on the cement but rarely with cellulose rod.

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                            • #15
                              yea rods react differently, ya gotta bang or peel the hang nail on 7018, but then run some 304l or 308l stainless, there is a hang nail that is huge, but just get the rod near the work and off she goes, i dont have sticking problems with 6011, my problem with the 3/32" size is that it fizzles out after 1/2 of it is used up, although i only run it on dc plus, i wonder if ac can make a diff.

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