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What type of material should i use?

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  • What type of material should i use?

    Putting together my new wood shop, and i need to build a wood rack. I'm thinking of bolting it to a inside block wall. So i can utilize the space under it to store my tools (planer, table saw) when I am not using them. I've searched for a while now looking for steel strenghts and haven't had much luck. Click image for larger version

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    I'm estimating that each level will have around 200 lbs of wood on it, I have 3 bars
    across in the picture, but can add 4 or 5. The grey is the block wall and the red is the
    steel, I'm planning on bolting the steel right through the block. Is this plan plausable? and what kind/size steel should i be using?

    Edit: sorry for the lousy diagram, my microsoft paint skills are not the greatest. the overall length to store the wood will be 16'
    Last edited by hit_em; 02-26-2012, 06:40 PM.

  • #2
    2x2x3/16 for the racks and 2x3 or 2x4 for the uprights. You can put the long side out and weld tabs to go thru the wall with the bolts...Bob
    Bob Wright

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    • #3
      Thanks for the fast reply bob. Do you see anything in the design that you would
      change/improve on?

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      • #4
        Hi, here is something similar on another site.

        http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...=1#post2125093

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        • #5
          What type of wood are you putting on it, anything flexible or flimsy, if so I would add more up-rites and cut down on the size. Can you pin to rafters/floor joists on top and floor on bottom, add shear strainth?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by go2building View Post
            What type of wood are you putting on it, anything flexible or flimsy, if so I would add more up-rites and cut down on the size. Can you pin to rafters/floor joists on top and floor on bottom, add shear strainth?

            type of wood would be 2x4 - 2x10 that short of thing, wouldn't be anything flimsy.
            the wood shop will be in a basment type area. So yes i can secure it to the floor joists above if need be. I would not be able to secure to the bottom concrete floor due to infloor heating.

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            • #7
              Ok (3) 2 X 3 X 3/16 should be more than enough. If you weld the 2 X 2 X 3/16 to the 2 X 3 X 3/16 you don't need the diagonals

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              • #8
                Originally posted by go2building View Post
                Ok (3) 2 X 3 X 3/16 should be more than enough. If you weld the 2 X 2 X 3/16 to the 2 X 3 X 3/16 you don't need the diagonals
                Perfect, that's just what I was looking for. The ideal way would be without the diagonals, so that's good to know. Should I be attaching the up rights to the floor joists above as well ? Once again thanks for all the help and info.

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                • #9
                  You could weld 2 X 2 across the front to stop deflection side to side?

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                  • #10
                    I'm planning on bolting the steel right through the block.


                    You are planing on using steel plates on other side of wall? Using 1/2 or larger galvanized threaded rod?

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                    • #11
                      Yes plates on the other side. Was going to use 5/8 rod

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                      • #12
                        I'm no engineer but my main concerns would be:

                        1. If you have more than 2 supports under each board, making sure they all line up close to perfect, to prevent putting warp/bend in the wood

                        2. I think I might make the horizontal supports slope a bit back toward the wall, so that if they bend slightly under load, there won't be a tendency for the boards to slide off and bonk you in the head while you're using your table saw.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Helios View Post
                          I'm no engineer but my main concerns would be:

                          1. If you have more than 2 supports under each board, making sure they all line up close to perfect, to prevent putting warp/bend in the wood

                          2. I think I might make the horizontal supports slope a bit back toward the wall, so that if they bend slightly under load, there won't be a tendency for the boards to slide off and bonk you in the head while you're using your table saw.

                          I think OP said he was using 3 up-rites , 3 should be ok for preventing warp/bending, as long as they are not at the ends and are in 4' from ends. You could put a pin system at ends like they do at the big DIY stores, to stop boards from falling

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