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  • Looking to pursue a career in Welding!

    Hello,
    I am currently a 17 year old high school student currently in my last year. I will be turning 18 in this March (2012) and graduating High School in June (2012).

    I am interested in getting a welding job and having a career in it. I live in Bayonne, New Jersey(Hudson County area). I currently take arc welding in this school year. Last year I took oxy-acetylene welding.

    I was wondering if anyone can help me find a path to get a career. I am planning on attending a trade school for welding but I am unsure which one to go to.

    Also I was wanting to join a union to weld. Weather it will be IronWorkers, Boilermakers, DockBuilders, PipeFitters, or any other jobs/careers/unions that do welding. Can someone please help me out.
    I would like to get a comfortable living as a welder.

    I was considering underwater welding, but I read that it damages your body and that you will be lucky to have that job for 10 years. Is this true about underwater welding?

    I have considered either going to HoHoKus in Paterson, New Jersey for Structural Plate Welding website is http://www.hohokus.com/Programs.php?program=25 .

    Or underwater welding in Erial, New Jersey website for that is http://divers.virtual.vps-host.net/ .

    Or underwater welding in Jacksonville, Florida website for that one is http://www.commercialdivingacademy.com/ .

    Or Hobart welding school in Troy, Ohio, the website for that is http://www.welding.org/default.aspx

    My brother recently got on the Local 45 Ironworkers in Jersey City. My brothers see many welders on site at there jobs. And I was wondering how you can get a steady job as a welder. Like there are many different fields like Pipefitter unions & Dockbuilders but to be honest I do not know a lot about them to decide which I would like to get into.

    I would like to go to trade school and get working as quickly as possible therefore I am not planning on going to a 2 or 4 year college.

    Thanks,
    David








  • #2
    Originally posted by DavidJ View Post
    Hello,
    I am currently a 17 year old high school student currently in my last year. I will be turning 18 in this March (2012) and graduating High School in June (2012).

    I am interested in getting a welding job and having a career in it. I live in Bayonne, New Jersey(Hudson County area). I currently take arc welding in this school year. Last year I took oxy-acetylene welding.

    I was wondering if anyone can help me find a path to get a career. I am planning on attending a trade school for welding but I am unsure which one to go to.

    Also I was wanting to join a union to weld. Weather it will be IronWorkers, Boilermakers, DockBuilders, PipeFitters, or any other jobs/careers/unions that do welding. Can someone please help me out.
    I would like to get a comfortable living as a welder.

    I was considering underwater welding, but I read that it damages your body and that you will be lucky to have that job for 10 years. Is this true about underwater welding?

    I have considered either going to HoHoKus in Paterson, New Jersey for Structural Plate Welding website is http://www.hohokus.com/Programs.php?program=25 .

    Or underwater welding in Erial, New Jersey website for that is http://divers.virtual.vps-host.net/ .

    Or underwater welding in Jacksonville, Florida website for that one is http://www.commercialdivingacademy.com/ .

    Or Hobart welding school in Troy, Ohio, the website for that is http://www.welding.org/default.aspx

    My brother recently got on the Local 45 Ironworkers in Jersey City. My brothers see many welders on site at there jobs. And I was wondering how you can get a steady job as a welder. Like there are many different fields like Pipefitter unions & Dockbuilders but to be honest I do not know a lot about them to decide which I would like to get into.

    I would like to go to trade school and get working as quickly as possible therefore I am not planning on going to a 2 or 4 year college.

    Thanks,
    David







    noone here can tell you which path to go. but employers like people with prior expierence. i would think about going to the welding school at a community collage or one of the welding companys schools like lincon or hobart. then move to an apprenticeship somewhere. trade work for training. you are still very young you wont be able to expect to jump into a good paying position right off the bat, espically with the economy there are so many well quailified and expierenced people are out of work they are willing to accept the same pay as an entry level worker.

    it sounds like you have a few different ideas choose one and go for it. if all else fails you can come into the military as a welder.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Seans363 View Post
      noone here can tell you which path to go. but employers like people with prior expierence. i would think about going to the welding school at a community collage or one of the welding companys schools like lincon or hobart. then move to an apprenticeship somewhere. trade work for training. you are still very young you wont be able to expect to jump into a good paying position right off the bat, espically with the economy there are so many well quailified and expierenced people are out of work they are willing to accept the same pay as an entry level worker.

      it sounds like you have a few different ideas choose one and go for it. if all else fails you can come into the military as a welder.
      Join the military as a welder? How can I possibly do that? If you have any information on that can you please tell me it. Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DavidJ View Post
        Join the military as a welder? How can I possibly do that? If you have any information on that can you please tell me it. Thanks
        talk to a recruter. the navy has jobs for welding/underwater welding on ships. here in the airforce we have a metals shop they have all sorts of neat toys in there every time i go in its like being in a candy store. their job is to weld and fabricate parts for the aircraft and other equipment. its a "maintance" job which for the military people consider it the bottom of the totum pole but the maintance carreer field jobs guys have the most fun.

        i am an AMMO troop we deal with all the explosives on the base it has its perks cause we are out in the middle of nowhere in the corner or back of every base so we get left alone but on the other end we are uausally forgotten about. that and every other career field thinks we are a bunch of perverted alchaholics who want to screw or fight everything....which is not completely true some of the time....

        if i had to do it all over again i would come in as a air refueler boom operator. they are the ones who refuel other aircraft while in the air. i got to watch them fuel up six f-16's on our trip back from a tdy and they had the coolest job i have ever seen.
        Last edited by Seans363; 01-16-2012, 10:36 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Seans363 View Post
          talk to a recruter. the navy has jobs for welding/underwater welding on ships. here in the airforce we have a metals shop they have all sorts of neat toys in there every time i go in its like being in a candy store. their job is to weld and fabricate parts for the aircraft and other equipment. its a "maintance" job which for the military people consider it the bottom of the totum pole but the maintance carreer field jobs guys have the most fun.

          i am an AMMO troop we deal with all the explosives on the base it has its perks cause we are out in the middle of nowhere in the corner or back of every base so we get left alone but on the other end we are uausally forgotten about. that and every other career field thinks we are a bunch of perverted alchaholics who want to screw or fight everything....which is not completely true some of the time....

          if i had to do it all over again i would come in as a air refueler boom operator. they are the ones who refuel other aircraft while in the air. i got to watch them fuel up six f-16's on our trip back from a tdy and they had the coolest job i have ever seen.
          That sounds very interesting! Also what is the pay and odds of getting that job? And how long can you stay in there for?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DavidJ View Post
            Hello,
            I am currently a 17 year old high school student currently in my last year. I will be turning 18 in this March (2012) and graduating High School in June (2012).

            I am interested in getting a welding job and having a career in it. I live in Bayonne, New Jersey(Hudson County area). I currently take arc welding in this school year. Last year I took oxy-acetylene welding.

            I was wondering if anyone can help me find a path to get a career. I am planning on attending a trade school for welding but I am unsure which one to go to.

            Also I was wanting to join a union to weld. Weather it will be IronWorkers, Boilermakers, DockBuilders, PipeFitters, or any other jobs/careers/unions that do welding. Can someone please help me out.
            I would like to get a comfortable living as a welder.

            I was considering underwater welding, but I read that it damages your body and that you will be lucky to have that job for 10 years. Is this true about underwater welding?

            I have considered either going to HoHoKus in Paterson, New Jersey for Structural Plate Welding website is http://www.hohokus.com/Programs.php?program=25 .

            Or underwater welding in Erial, New Jersey website for that is http://divers.virtual.vps-host.net/ .

            Or underwater welding in Jacksonville, Florida website for that one is http://www.commercialdivingacademy.com/ .

            Or Hobart welding school in Troy, Ohio, the website for that is http://www.welding.org/default.aspx

            My brother recently got on the Local 45 Ironworkers in Jersey City. My brothers see many welders on site at there jobs. And I was wondering how you can get a steady job as a welder. Like there are many different fields like Pipefitter unions & Dockbuilders but to be honest I do not know a lot about them to decide which I would like to get into.

            I would like to go to trade school and get working as quickly as possible therefore I am not planning on going to a 2 or 4 year college.

            Thanks,
            David







            Some good advice here..the military would be an interesting choice....be careful believing what a recuiter tells you...I shipped out to RVN in 1968[drafted] with guys that were supposed to go to cook school or electronics school...because their recruiter told them if they signed it would keep them out of harms way.... WHETHER or it is still like that I do not know...best of luck to you...D

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by donnie View Post
              Some good advice here..the military would be an interesting choice....be careful believing what a recuiter tells you...I shipped out to RVN in 1968[drafted] with guys that were supposed to go to cook school or electronics school...because their recruiter told them if they signed it would keep them out of harms way.... WHETHER or it is still like that I do not know...best of luck to you...D
              I would really prefer not to join the Military but I will do that at last resort. I was hoping someone an give me some information on Hobart Welding school.

              Like is it worth the money? How much total will it be? Do they hook you up with a job at the end when you graduate?

              Comment


              • #8
                Hobart has an awesome facility and very knowledgable instructors. I was lucky enough to take a few different courses from them and was very impressed with the place overall. I know they have a job placement program but couldn't tell you what the placement rate is. Good luck with whatever you decide.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DavidJ View Post
                  That sounds very interesting! Also what is the pay and odds of getting that job? And how long can you stay in there for?
                  well for the air force at least you can have your job you want gaurenteed you just have to be firm and not give in...

                  what will happen is you will take your ASVAB and that is what will quailify you for different jobs.. the better you score the more of a job selection you will have open to you.

                  best thing to do is to talk to the recruter and find out what job you want before you take the asvab so you will know ahead of time what you need to score for said job.

                  once you get the score you will go to MEPS and get a physical and they will have you choose up to 5 jobs...

                  ************************************************** ******
                  but you can tell them the job you want and if they say its not available and try to get you to choose something else... say I WILL WAIT UNTIL IT OPENS UP.
                  ************************************************** ******

                  you might have to wait a few months to get to leave but when it comes down to having to do that job for however many years you are in the military a few months is worth it.


                  as far as pay goes that varies greatly... but the first 4 years you are in you will get about 3 raises each year its pretty nice.

                  you get a base pay. if you start as an E-3 by signing up for 6 years or having college credits or other reasons base pay is $1757.00 a month.. then if you are married you get a housing allowance pay (BAH) depending on where you are at can be $800-$1200 a month then you will get a food allowance (BAS) about $325 a month. if you are on flying status there are extra pay and other jobs...

                  lets say you are a single when you come in and you are an E-3
                  you would proly live in the dorms for a year or two unless you got married so at first you wont see the housing or food money cause your dorm is free as are all utilitys and so is all your meals..

                  $1757.00 half on the 1st of the month half on the 15th. your paycheck just coming in would proly be aout $800 twice a month but thats after basic and tech school cause you are an e-1 till then.

                  but like me i have been in 8 years and i take home just over $2000 each paycheck... thats after my TSP (401k for military) taxes exc....so almost 50k take home a year for 8 years on the job... not great but no medical bills ither..

                  so it does get pretty decent espically for someone with no college. although i am 12 credits from an AA degree and i have not even taken a class of any kind...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Seans363 View Post
                    well for the air force at least you can have your job you want gaurenteed you just have to be firm and not give in...

                    what will happen is you will take your ASVAB and that is what will quailify you for different jobs.. the better you score the more of a job selection you will have open to you.

                    best thing to do is to talk to the recruter and find out what job you want before you take the asvab so you will know ahead of time what you need to score for said job.

                    once you get the score you will go to MEPS and get a physical and they will have you choose up to 5 jobs...

                    ************************************************** ******
                    but you can tell them the job you want and if they say its not available and try to get you to choose something else... say I WILL WAIT UNTIL IT OPENS UP.
                    ************************************************** ******

                    you might have to wait a few months to get to leave but when it comes down to having to do that job for however many years you are in the military a few months is worth it.


                    as far as pay goes that varies greatly... but the first 4 years you are in you will get about 3 raises each year its pretty nice.

                    you get a base pay. if you start as an E-3 by signing up for 6 years or having college credits or other reasons base pay is $1757.00 a month.. then if you are married you get a housing allowance pay (BAH) depending on where you are at can be $800-$1200 a month then you will get a food allowance (BAS) about $325 a month. if you are on flying status there are extra pay and other jobs...

                    lets say you are a single when you come in and you are an E-3
                    you would proly live in the dorms for a year or two unless you got married so at first you wont see the housing or food money cause your dorm is free as are all utilitys and so is all your meals..

                    $1757.00 half on the 1st of the month half on the 15th. your paycheck just coming in would proly be aout $800 twice a month but thats after basic and tech school cause you are an e-1 till then.

                    but like me i have been in 8 years and i take home just over $2000 each paycheck... thats after my TSP (401k for military) taxes exc....so almost 50k take home a year for 8 years on the job... not great but no medical bills ither..

                    so it does get pretty decent espically for someone with no college. although i am 12 credits from an AA degree and i have not even taken a class of any kind...
                    Thanks for that information! I recently took the ASVAB in school and I got a 66. I am planning on taking it again in the Spring time. Is a 66 good or good enough for a welding career in the Military?

                    Also say if I was to join air Force for the Navy as a welder. Do I have to go through boot camp and the physically training?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DavidJ View Post
                      Thanks for that information! I recently took the ASVAB in school and I got a 66. I am planning on taking it again in the Spring time. Is a 66 good or good enough for a welding career in the Military?

                      Also say if I was to join air Force for the Navy as a welder. Do I have to go through boot camp and the physically training?
                      yes when you join the military you will go through basic training.. that was my biggest fear when i joined.. but once your dont you look back and say that it was fun.

                      i cant give you too many details on the navy i bet a little time on google and you will be able to find out anything you want to know about the career fields and the quailifications to get in. a 66 is not a bad score and depending on what sections you did well in i would bet that a 66 would be good enough to be a welder. google it or pick up a phone and call a recruter.

                      remember it is the military. you will travel. you will most likely not be living very close to your home town. you will deploy so in the navy as a welder i am sure that is a pretty good thing to have on the ship..

                      it is not for everyone but i think it is something everyone should expeierence in their lifetime.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the information about the military and welding. but does anyone know anything about Hobart Institute of Welding Technology. I am thinking about going into the 9 month structural and pipe welding. I live in New Jersey therefore I will have to live in Ohio for 9 months. Anyone think this is a good approach into the welding career?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DavidJ View Post
                          Hello,
                          I am currently a 17 year old high school student currently in my last year. I will be turning 18 in this March (2012) and graduating High School in June (2012).

                          I am interested in getting a welding job and having a career in it. I live in Bayonne, New Jersey(Hudson County area). I currently take arc welding in this school year. Last year I took oxy-acetylene welding.

                          I was wondering if anyone can help me find a path to get a career. I am planning on attending a trade school for welding but I am unsure which one to go to.

                          Also I was wanting to join a union to weld. Weather it will be IronWorkers, Boilermakers, DockBuilders, PipeFitters, or any other jobs/careers/unions that do welding. Can someone please help me out.
                          I would like to get a comfortable living as a welder.

                          I was considering underwater welding, but I read that it damages your body and that you will be lucky to have that job for 10 years. Is this true about underwater welding?

                          I have considered either going to HoHoKus in Paterson, New Jersey for Structural Plate Welding website is http://www.hohokus.com/Programs.php?program=25 .

                          Or underwater welding in Erial, New Jersey website for that is http://divers.virtual.vps-host.net/ .

                          Or underwater welding in Jacksonville, Florida website for that one is http://www.commercialdivingacademy.com/ .

                          Or Hobart welding school in Troy, Ohio, the website for that is http://www.welding.org/default.aspx

                          My brother recently got on the Local 45 Ironworkers in Jersey City. My brothers see many welders on site at there jobs. And I was wondering how you can get a steady job as a welder. Like there are many different fields like Pipefitter unions & Dockbuilders but to be honest I do not know a lot about them to decide which I would like to get into.

                          I would like to go to trade school and get working as quickly as possible therefore I am not planning on going to a 2 or 4 year college.

                          Thanks,
                          David








                          My take is this,
                          If you intend to join a building trades union you will be wasting your time and $$$ paying for welding instruction. All of the trades you mentioned have strong welding programs for apprentices at no cost and usually pretty dialed in instructors.
                          That means you may walk in with less "welder" cred, but with a lot more money in your pocket and the ability to get that same welder cred as fast as you are able to absorb/learn it.
                          There's a lot of variety in the work done by the trades you mentioned, it might be a good deal for you to look closer at what, and where those trades weld.
                          An apprenticeship is an opportunity, some people skate by but a lot are determined men'women with a family to support or just a lot of ambition and those cats really learn the trade in depth. I probably don't have to tell you which type works the most and makes the most.
                          You can make a comfortable (or more) living in any of the trades you listed if you are a serious student of the game and do the work to the best of your ability and are getting better every stinking day.
                          But the work environment and conditions worked in can differ by a lot, so do a little research and pick which environment suites your mentality the best.
                          Again I'd say this, if you want to work primarily as a welder in one of the trades you listed I wouldn't waste my $$$ attending a welding school. I'd get in NOW and take maximum advantage of all welding time and instruction time available in that apprenticeship program. It cost you nothing and the schools are usually open many hours. The welding instructors love to see a young hand wanting to excell.
                          But life in the pipefitters is way different than life in the Ironworkers, BM's, etc. So first figure that part out and then ler 'er rip.
                          That opinion is based on my time working as a Journeyman welding in all of those trades you mentioned except the Boilermakers. They can all be fun, and pay well for a productive, quality hand (construction work recognizes production more than most) but the work can be very different (and very the same) amongst those trades.
                          Apprenticeship coordinators (regardless of the craft and regardless of the location)LOVE to see these things:
                          1) I'll show up every day, on time.
                          2) I can pass a drug test.
                          3) I won't have to take time off to see my PO or for a court date. That one happens, but it's better if your not on paper ; )
                          4) I can read a tape and do math related to the trade.
                          5) I REALLY want to learn the craft.
                          6) I have reliable transportation, I'll be there **** or high water.
                          and..7) I'll show up on time every day and earn my pay. Period.
                          Those traits make for a Golden Apprentice who'll make a good living and have a solid reputation in a building trades local. There is a treasure trove of accumulated knowledge available to an apprentice. Some skate and others absorb.
                          The absorbers do good work and make a happy living.
                          Politics is present, the human element is there union or non union, some days are a lot better than others but a guy/gal who loves the trade can excell and be happy.
                          You can email me with any questions I might help with.
                          Construction work is in the tank righ now in most areas, it's really picked up in other areas. Some are not taking in apprentices until the workload comes back.
                          Research is your friend.
                          You should be comfortable working at heights in any of those trades.

                          JT


                          I have to add, the military option is very, very, very good. Serve your country and learn a trade. All of the building tades unions are in the "helmets to hardhats" program and actively recruit prior military members regardless of MOS.
                          The physical demands are really easily attained by any young man/woman ( Don't EVEN think that a welder in the Ironworkers can be fat/dumb, or the Millwrights/Pipefitters/Pile Drivers/etc. Pile Drivers (Dock Builders ) and Iron Workers in particular climb/lift a lot and only the strong survive, the same applies to the other trades to a lesser extent.
                          It will do you a world of good, only takes a small portion of your life (and you'll learn many life lessons that are invaluable later on), you'll make a living, eat for free, wear groovy uniforms, and you will feel better as a man regardless of what you do latter in civilian life.
                          Go for it. It tells an employer (or an apprenticeship coordinator) that you can get up early, deal effectively with a wide variety of people from all cultural/economic/racial backgrounds, do your work on time under duress, work long hours under all conditions, have some amount of disipline, have self control, obey orders well. All the things and more that matter in a civilian welding life.
                          Plus it's just a lot of fun.
                          And you'll feel serious pride when they play the National Anthem at the local high school football game.
                          Did I mention the groovy uniforms?

                          I should also add (hey, I'm writing a book here, whatever, the building trades need ambitious young welders) that in the union building trades no one and nothing protects your job except your ability to do the work. You are an at will employee and can get a run off at any time for any thing. Just the way it is.
                          People who try to impart union knowledge from say a car plant or other manufacturing environment onto a building trades union just don't have the knowledge needed to comment.
                          Union construction employment can be a harsh world but in the end recognizes productive hands well.
                          Last edited by JTMcC; 01-17-2012, 05:36 PM.
                          Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                            My take is this,
                            If you intend to join a building trades union you will be wasting your time and $$$ paying for welding instruction. All of the trades you mentioned have strong welding programs for apprentices at no cost and usually pretty dialed in instructors.
                            That means you may walk in with less "welder" cred, but with a lot more money in your pocket and the ability to get that same welder cred as fast as you are able to absorb/learn it.
                            There's a lot of variety in the work done by the trades you mentioned, it might be a good deal for you to look closer at what, and where those trades weld.
                            An apprenticeship is an opportunity, some people skate by but a lot are determined men'women with a family to support or just a lot of ambition and those cats really learn the trade in depth. I probably don't have to tell you which type works the most and makes the most.
                            You can make a comfortable (or more) living in any of the trades you listed if you are a serious student of the game and do the work to the best of your ability and are getting better every stinking day.
                            But the work environment and conditions worked in can differ by a lot, so do a little research and pick which environment suites your mentality the best.
                            Again I'd say this, if you want to work primarily as a welder in one of the trades you listed I wouldn't waste my $$$ attending a welding school. I'd get in NOW and take maximum advantage of all welding time and instruction time available in that apprenticeship program. It cost you nothing and the schools are usually open many hours. The welding instructors love to see a young hand wanting to excell.
                            But life in the pipefitters is way different than life in the Ironworkers, BM's, etc. So first figure that part out and then ler 'er rip.
                            That opinion is based on my time working as a Journeyman welding in all of those trades you mentioned except the Boilermakers. They can all be fun, and pay well for a productive, quality hand (construction work recognizes production more than most) but the work can be very different (and very the same) amongst those trades.
                            Apprenticeship coordinators (regardless of the craft and regardless of the location)LOVE to see these things:
                            1) I'll show up every day, on time.
                            2) I can pass a drug test.
                            3) I won't have to take time off to see my PO or for a court date. That one happens, but it's better if your not on paper ; )
                            4) I can read a tape and do math related to the trade.
                            5) I REALLY want to learn the craft.
                            6) I have reliable transportation, I'll be there **** or high water.
                            and..7) I'll show up on time every day and earn my pay. Period.
                            Those traits make for a Golden Apprentice who'll make a good living and have a solid reputation in a building trades local. There is a treasure trove of accumulated knowledge available to an apprentice. Some skate and others absorb.
                            The absorbers do good work and make a happy living.
                            Politics is present, the human element is there union or non union, some days are a lot better than others but a guy/gal who loves the trade can excell and be happy.
                            You can email me with any questions I might help with.
                            Construction work is in the tank righ now in most areas, it's really picked up in other areas. Some are not taking in apprentices until the workload comes back.
                            Research is your friend.
                            You should be comfortable working at heights in any of those trades.

                            JT


                            I have to add, the military option is very, very, very good. Serve your country and learn a trade. All of the building tades unions are in the "helmets to hardhats" program and actively recruit prior military members regardless of MOS.
                            The physical demands are really easily attained by any young man/woman ( Don't EVEN think that a welder in the Ironworkers can be fat/dumb, or the Millwrights/Pipefitters/Pile Drivers/etc. Pile Drivers (Dock Builders ) and Iron Workers in particular climb/lift a lot and only the strong survive, the same applies to the other trades to a lesser extent.
                            It will do you a world of good, only takes a small portion of your life (and you'll learn many life lessons that are invaluable later on), you'll make a living, eat for free, wear groovy uniforms, and you will feel better as a man regardless of what you do latter in civilian life.
                            Go for it. It tells an employer (or an apprenticeship coordinator) that you can get up early, deal effectively with a wide variety of people from all cultural/economic/racial backgrounds, do your work on time under duress, work long hours under all conditions, have some amount of disipline, have self control, obey orders well. All the things and more that matter in a civilian welding life.
                            Plus it's just a lot of fun.
                            And you'll feel serious pride when they play the National Anthem at the local high school football game.
                            Did I mention the groovy uniforms?

                            I should also add (hey, I'm writing a book here, whatever, the building trades need ambitious young welders) that in the union building trades no one and nothing protects your job except your ability to do the work. You are an at will employee and can get a run off at any time for any thing. Just the way it is.
                            People who try to impart union knowledge from say a car plant or other manufacturing environment onto a building trades union just don't have the knowledge needed to comment.
                            Union construction employment can be a harsh world but in the end recognizes productive hands well.

                            THANKS A LOT FOR THAT VERY VERY USEFUL INFORMATION! Out of curiosity where did you begin your welding career?

                            And also when I see an open Union apprenticeship I will apply but how can I make myself standout compared to all the other men that want the job as well.

                            The military is definitely in the back of my head but to be honest I rather get straight into a Union, but if that does not work then I will join Air Force or navy as a welder!

                            By the way what is your email address so I can email you some questions I have.
                            Thanks,
                            David J

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                            • #15
                              [email protected]
                              Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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