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Gas Lens + Pipe Screens = No More Spatter in Lenses!

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  • JayO
    replied
    Originally posted by fairandfree View Post
    Just because you are a good driver doesn't mean you shouldn't buckle your seatbelt before you hit the pedal
    It is more like adding a second seatbelt to the drivers seat believing it will make for a better driver rather then improving on the basic skills of driving.

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  • shovelon
    replied
    Hiya FairandFree. Welcome!!!!


    Nice of you to join the forum and share your discoveries with us. Keep'em coming.

    I use RO water in my coolers too. I don't think it takes out all the minerals, but in 33 years I have never had a problem with corrosion.

    BBUUUUTTT,
    filters are definately recommended. Last thing you want is to pump lint into your torch. All of my Procons have screens built into the pump. If I did not have them I would purchase standalone filter screens.

    Leave a comment:


  • fairandfree
    replied
    Originally posted by brims View Post
    Isn't deionized water cheaper to buy that buying a DI filter and RO membrane for a TIG torch cooler?
    Not if you already have an RO system. Get yourself some much better tap water and free coolant at the same time. The RO membrane and DI filter are not installed in your cooler, they are just used to obtain a supply of clean and deionized water for use in a closed-circuit flow loop. Once you cap off your tank (you can use a 3 or 5 gallon water bottle if you would like to visually inspect your coolant at will) and connect your lines, you don't need a filter in your water cooler system.

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  • brims
    replied
    Isn't deionized water cheaper to buy that buying a DI filter and RO membrane for a TIG torch cooler?

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Laminar Flow

    Originally posted by fairandfree View Post
    Just because you are a good driver doesn't mean you shouldn't buckle your seatbelt before you hit the pedal
    Not trying to be mean spirited.... but we seem to be missing each other in the fog.... I think you are barking up the wrong tree... well intentioned.. but misdirected...

    1. The purpose of a gas lense is to direct the shielding gas in a laminar flow so that it can hug the surface without turbulence.... introducing anything into that gas stream will destroy the laminarity of that flow and reintroduce the turbulence that the gas lense was supposed to eliminate.... thus destroying its usefulness....Bottom line... you are back to square one and might as well be using a conventional cup and collet....

    2. If you are getting spatter while tig welding you have a problem with the process, preparation or technique... drop back and reexamine what you are doing... if you are getting spatter then your weld quality is likely suffering as well, with contamination and inclusions... and are defeating one of the major advantages of TIG and that is the purity of the weld bead...

    Have attached a couple of pics of the laminar flow

    Click image for larger version

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    Click image for larger version

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  • fairandfree
    replied
    Just because you are a good driver doesn't mean you shouldn't buckle your seatbelt before you hit the pedal

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    I would suggest that if someone is having a spatter problem while TIG welding... that the problem is NOT a need for auxiliary screens inside the cup... but a problem of technique or preparation..... it is usually a result of improperly cleaned weld area, contamination, corrosion, or submerging the tungsten in the puddle.... and very rarely a contaminated bottle of gas....... If you are having that severe a problem with spatter inside the cup...I would back up and take a close look at technique and process......... TIG Welding requires scrupulously clean material, tungsten and filler....... "Welding Through" contaminents is a bad practice....

    Why worry about putting an additional screen on the gas lens when the "real" answer is to eliminate the cause of that spatter...??... that is the root of the problem....
    Last edited by H80N; 12-15-2011, 09:14 PM. Reason: clarity....

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  • fairandfree
    replied
    Yes, TIG is usually spatterless, but spatter does still happen. This is an arc-welding process; spatter can result at any moment you hit a not so clean area on the work, if you get a gas surge for some reason or if something goes wrong momentarily, etc. It takes a split second and you get little steel balls stuck on your diffuser which will not come off. This is how a gas lens collet body meets its demise.

    Leave a comment:


  • TxDarth
    replied
    Not for nothing but I haven't noticed that much "splattering" inside my torch - I am not a professional, just a hobbiest.

    I get a little splatter from MIG but not TIG - is that not one of the advantages?

    Leave a comment:


  • walker d.
    replied
    I like the idea very simple. don't see it changing gas flow just a added protection for a gas lense. some may need you to draw them a picture can't grasp it. or try to get over technical and analize it to a science
    (lmbo) Have a good day!!!!!!!

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  • fairandfree
    replied
    Thanks, I got that impression. If anyone has trouble visualizing it: I took one of these,
    made a hole in it to allow the tungsten to slide through (should be snug), and then slid the tungsten through an ordinary gas lens so that this screen shown in the photo (impaled with a tungsten electrode) shields the gas lens collet body diffuser from spatter and weld debris. Then you just screw / press on the gas lens alumina or pyrex nozzle and start welding. It works great and I save money. What's not to like?

    Another trick is using several drops of Physan 20 in distilled water as a TIG torch coolant additive for water cooled torches. Keeps the water clear of algae, fungal spores, and other microbes that might end up growing in there. Far cheaper than expensive coolant, but Miller will void your warranty if you use anything other than their recommended coolant in their Coolmate circulator. I'm using a brass carbon-vane Procon pump to circulate my water-based coolant and it works well. You can use reverse osmosis water if you have a DI filter after the RO membrane, much faster than waiting for water to distill.
    Last edited by fairandfree; 12-15-2011, 04:29 PM.

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  • 67cudafb
    replied
    Hardcore

    Thanks for tip. Most of guys on hear are hardcore welders and overly friendly to noobs, don't take it personal. If you are looking for a more social group to noobs try everlast forum. I don't do alot of posting here just sit on the side and try to suck up info from the pro welders on this forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    I get it without any additional visual aids.... will use my gas lenses as designed and intended... any mods will change their functionality...
    is not a matter of understanding your intent... just that the cost benefit ratio in my case dictates using unadulterated equipment...

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  • Kamikaze
    replied
    Fair and free,

    I appreciate what you are trying to help with.
    But I believe it would get the message across better if you post detailed photos showing the application of this along with the description you have provided.

    Leave a comment:


  • fairandfree
    replied
    I am telling you I am using gas lenses but putting pipe screens in front of them to prevent spatter from reaching the lens. I don't think I can be any more clear than that. It means I can use the same gas lens over and over again and not have to change it. Pipe screens cost literally pennies. I have not seen gas lens collet bodies for less than about $2.15 each and those were cheap Chinese imports. Weldcraft gas lens collet bodies can go for more than $6 each depending on your supplier. Wouldn't it be nice to make good consumables last a long time?

    I think some people would definitely appreciate this idea, it has saved me from swapping lenses already!

    Leave a comment:

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