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  • Bobcat 250 oil drain?

    Hello, I have a Bobcat 250 w/ Kohler engine. I was wanting the part # for the rubber flexible oil drain tube to attach to my existing drain hole on the engine. It makes a mess to change oil the way it comes. Thank You

  • #2
    Originally posted by 74fencer View Post
    Hello, I have a Bobcat 250 w/ Kohler engine. I was wanting the part # for the rubber flexible oil drain tube to attach to my existing drain hole on the engine. It makes a mess to change oil the way it comes. Thank You
    I think the drain tube on mine is 1/2".

    However, just measure the drain nipple on your machine, go to a hardware store and purchase the correct size of vinyl tubing in whatever length you need.

    Griff

    P.S.

    If you bought the machine new it should have come with the tube.
    Last edited by griff01; 12-04-2011, 08:36 PM. Reason: spelling correction

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    • #3
      Piece of garden hose into a drain pan works
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      • #4
        I would like to know how to get the one made for the engine. My Trailblazer came with one. A company called Drainzit makes one but i would need to know the thread size.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by griff01 View Post
          I think the drain tube on mine is 1/2".

          However, just measure the drain nipple on your machine, go to a hardware store and purchase the correct size of vinyl tubing in whateve length you need.

          Griff

          P.S.

          If you bought the machine new it should have come with the tube.
          I just looked at the one here at work, it has the 20HP kohler. A piece of 3/8" hose is all you need, it slips over the hose barb on the engine oil drain. Slip the cap off yours and take a look, it does not thread on, it is a slip on fit. Just get a long enough piece to clear the side of the machine and into a drain pan, 2' should be plenty unless it's mounted in a confined area. No need to make it harder or more expensive than it needs to be. I have a clear piece of tubing foe my 225 Bobcat so I can see the oil as it comes out of the engine. Just go to the hardware store and get a piece, no ordering or waiting for it to arrive. I believe this will work for you too 74fencer.
          Last edited by Bistineau; 12-02-2011, 08:10 AM.

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          • #6
            Ok Thanks alot.

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            • #7
              While on the oil change subject I thought I would share a little info on how to make sure all the old oil is removed during oil changes. I learned this trick from an old guy that repairs small engines and lawn mowers on the side at his house. When changing the oil on my Trailblazer I use this method to not so much make sure all the old oil is removed, but to try and get as much of the sludge or other particles removed..........these are the engine killers.

              I made a grommet to fit around the end of my compressed air nozzle that makes a seal at the engine dip stick tube. I made a drain hose extension to make this easier, and less messy. I warm the engine for about 5 minutes then shut it off. I then attach the drain hose extension and fasten the hose end to the container the oil will be drained into (make sure hose is inserted several inches). Drain oil as you would normally, except if you are in a hurry you can use the compressed air to place a few psi (just a few psi) into the dip stick tube......the oil will flow out quicker.

              I then spray 1/2 can of Brakleen into the dip stick tube, wait a few minutes, then add a little compressed air to the dip stick tube to force all the nasty stuff out. I then repeat the last process agian with the rest of the Brakleen and again let it set a few minutes to disolve the gunk, then remove the cleaner with compressed air. Then I will normally wait several minutes for everything to settle at the bottom then apply low steady air pressure to the dip stick tube to make sure everything has been removed.

              Close drain hose

              Remove old oil filter and install new oil filter, then add proper ammount of fresh oil (I use Mobil 1 10-W-30 synthetic)

              Set used oil out of way and let set a day or two for Brakleen to evaporate, then dispose of used oil responsibly.

              Now, I know there will be some on here that will want to pick apart my method and claim it could cause damage to the engine by using compressed air and a solvent........to those I say don't use this method. In the 3 years I have been doing mine and the 2 at work there has not been one problem associated with my drain method. I feel that doing it this way may be a little more time consuming, but it should help extend the engine life a little.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bistineau View Post
                I just looked at the one here at work, it has the 20HP kohler. A piece of 3/8" hose is all you need, it slips over the hose barb on the engine oil drain. Slip the cap off yours and take a look, it does not thread on, it is a slip on fit. Just get a long enough piece to clear the side of the machine and into a drain pan, 2' should be plenty unless it's mounted in a confined area. No need to make it harder or more expensive than it needs to be. I have a clear piece of tubing foe my 225 Bobcat so I can see the oil as it comes out of the engine. Just go to the hardware store and get a piece, no ordering or waiting for it to arrive. I believe this will work for you too 74fencer.
                Bistineau,

                I believe you replied to the wrong person as I already know this and pretty much stated such.

                Griff

                Comment


                • #9
                  Now, I know there will be some on here that will want to pick apart my method and claim it could cause damage to the engine by using compressed air and a solvent........to those I say don't use this method. In the 3 years I have been doing mine and the 2 at work there has not been one problem associated with my drain method. I feel that doing it this way may be a little more time consuming, but it should help extend the engine life a little.
                  I think a guy ought to find 3 more units and do it the regular way for 3 years and see if there is any difference.
                  I really can't link the fact that this old guy that fixes engines at his house is much of a credential, I would be suspect if he is encouraging this on a sophisticated engine, one with a filter and pressure fed system, this is not a standard practice, has the potential of causing a problem, is a dangerous worthless waste of time practice at best especially with modern synthetic oil that was changed anywhere near a service interval.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    your better off buying a piece of hose at the hardware store because the one that came with my bobcat really isn't long enough to make it to the oil pan to drain it out seems like it could be 10"longer and it would be perfect .the one that came with it is only about 12" long and doesn't make it out the hole and it gets oil all over the frame .if i try to run it out the side it kinks up and doesn't drain at all.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pat View Post
                      While on the oil change subject I thought I would share a little info on how to make sure all the old oil is removed during oil changes. I learned this trick from an old guy that repairs small engines and lawn mowers on the side at his house. When changing the oil on my Trailblazer I use this method to not so much make sure all the old oil is removed, but to try and get as much of the sludge or other particles removed..........these are the engine killers.

                      I made a grommet to fit around the end of my compressed air nozzle that makes a seal at the engine dip stick tube. I made a drain hose extension to make this easier, and less messy. I warm the engine for about 5 minutes then shut it off. I then attach the drain hose extension and fasten the hose end to the container the oil will be drained into (make sure hose is inserted several inches). Drain oil as you would normally, except if you are in a hurry you can use the compressed air to place a few psi (just a few psi) into the dip stick tube......the oil will flow out quicker.

                      I then spray 1/2 can of Brakleen into the dip stick tube, wait a few minutes, then add a little compressed air to the dip stick tube to force all the nasty stuff out. I then repeat the last process agian with the rest of the Brakleen and again let it set a few minutes to disolve the gunk, then remove the cleaner with compressed air. Then I will normally wait several minutes for everything to settle at the bottom then apply low steady air pressure to the dip stick tube to make sure everything has been removed.

                      Close drain hose

                      Remove old oil filter and install new oil filter, then add proper ammount of fresh oil (I use Mobil 1 10-W-30 synthetic)

                      Set used oil out of way and let set a day or two for Brakleen to evaporate, then dispose of used oil responsibly.

                      Now, I know there will be some on here that will want to pick apart my method and claim it could cause damage to the engine by using compressed air and a solvent........to those I say don't use this method. In the 3 years I have been doing mine and the 2 at work there has not been one problem associated with my drain method. I feel that doing it this way may be a little more time consuming, but it should help extend the engine life a little.
                      putting any kind of solvent into a crankcase is not a really good idea. your washing out any sort of lubricant that has coated the bearing and other workings inside the engine.and that second or two after you fire up the engine your pretty much running it with dry bearings with no lube at all on them. if you change the oil like it should be changed there shouldn't be any crude build up at all.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by griff01 View Post
                        Bistineau,

                        I believe you replied to the wrong person as I already know this and pretty much stated such.

                        Griff
                        No, I was just trying to make a clarification on the required size of the tubing needed. When you said "I think it is 1/2" , I take it you were going off memory as to what it is without actually looking at one. But since we have the same machine here at work I went to look and verify the size before posting as I wasn't quite sure myself whether it is 3/8" or 1/2". I believe this may help eliminate any possible confusion on the proper size, as you gave 1/2" & I said 3/8". Not a big diferance either way, but cuts down on possible mess by have a snug vs. looser fitting hose. The 1/2" would work sure, but would probably leak a little at the fitting. But he might want to get a little more than the 2' I suggested.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tommy2069 View Post
                          putting any kind of solvent into a crankcase is not a really good idea. your washing out any sort of lubricant that has coated the bearing and other workings inside the engine.and that second or two after you fire up the engine your pretty much running it with dry bearings with no lube at all on them. if you change the oil like it should be changed there shouldn't be any crude build up at all.
                          I understand what your concern is, but if you were to be able to view a cutaway of the engine block, you could see that any solvent added while the engine is not running will go directly to the bottom without washing any bearings. Then the solvent is evacuated with low pressure air with no harm. As I stated in the beginning, not everyone will feel confortable doing it this way, and it is a bit time consuming....no problem, continue doing it the standard way. I just thought I would offer the idea up to people who may have a concern about sludge and other particle build up.

                          Also, this method is not "dangerous" if common sense is used, and applying only low air pressure. The person doing this at his house that I learned this trick from may or may not have any "credentials", I don't know, but then again are internet wannabe electricians sanctioned.....I don't know that either but I would not say that their advice was necessarily dangerous if common sense was used in applying their advice.

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