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Adding a 230v outlet for a Diversion 180

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  • #16
    As I understand it, the circuit breaker is there to prevent the wire between the breaker and the outlet from over-heating and causing a fire.
    In general this is true,,, especially with general use circuits where there is multiple outlets on the same circuit, so the housewife cant put several heaters on one line. For equipment that runs continuous this is also true but some types of loads its the connected load that protects the wire. Think of a light fixture, 16 wire connected to a 20A circuit, limited by the size lamp the fixture will accept. I found a lamp cord in wall from a switch a while back, been there 50 yrs, wasn't code legal then or now but the installer probably understood a light was never going to overload the wire.
    Breakers in some equipment circuits are there primarily for short circuit interruption, any wire connected to a circuit need to be heavy enough to deliver adequate fault current to trip the breaker. 12 for up to 50, 8 for 100, depending on conductor size. Some circuits allow number 8 conductors to 100A also, each machine or connected load is different.
    Also doesnt need a disconnect as this is cord and plug.
    Last edited by Sberry; 10-14-2011, 07:55 AM.

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    • #17
      I just bought a diversion 180 and am doing the same thing for the garage. My father in law is an electrician so he's been teaching me how it works and how to make various custom extension cords etc. He says that from my breaker its 12G for all electricity in my house. We are going to use 8G for the 230v plug, along with 8G for extension cords. Good luck, have some fun
      -Dave

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      • #18
        8 is great, it will work for any factory (50) cord supplied machine and I like it better than 6 just cause its easier to bend around in a box, its way beyond whats needed for a Diversion but won't hurt a thing.

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        • #19
          RAyJ, thank you for pointing that out. You are correct and I don't know how that sentence came out so twisted.

          Sberry,
          The 6/3 cords I use are all, more or less, extension cords that lay in floor guides (to protect them from hot metal, sharp edges, etc). They allow me to keep most of my smaller equipment fairly mobile without needing to run new outlets every time I move things around. If a circuit is over 50A, I'll run a hard wired circuit via conduit, using heavier-gauge single strands, directly to where that machine is mounted.
          Last edited by TX-D; 10-14-2011, 12:21 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
            I mean sheite, might as well put in a
            125amp CB, Disconect and be all set for a Synch 300
            That's what I'm talking about, be ready for any future machine with more power requirements.

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            • #21
              Sberry,
              The 6/3 cords I use are all, more or less, extension cords that lay in floor guides (to protect them from hot metal, sharp edges, etc). They allow me to keep most of my smaller equipment fairly mobile without needing to run new outlets every time I move things around. If a circuit is over 50A, I'll run a hard wired circuit via conduit, using heavier-gage single strands, directly to where that machine is mounted.
              Yes, that sounds great. Usually heavy machines have a home, another good idea.
              I got some 10 I made up, a couple 25's and one about 70 or so, back in the day in older shop I kept the 70 on a cart all the time with a 175 mig, I wasn't as convenient as I am now and moved around more. Had AC/DC buzzer with couple racks of lead, one went outdoor, stinger to grounded bench and another set reached indoor, buzzer sat near an electric service, never moved. I still basically have it that way today, some of the machines all hooked to same ground point, benches grounded, welding booth grounded, stinger there, stinger with lead reaches out on to the floor or out the door, use same ground for plasma.
              I used to have a couple torch setups, 100 ft of hose to a station, one on LP and the other acetylene but plasma has replaced a lot of that need for cutting so went back to one gas on a cart.
              There are occasional metal fab jobs but basically maintenance type work anymore, convenience is everything. Machine stationed at work bench, flip switch, weld, etc and usually takes longer to find my helmet or glasses than to do most work.
              Many of my competitors view repair and welding etc as a last resort but if I can fab or fix my way out of a problem I am all over it especially if its a permanent solution or speeds production. I am all for buying when the time is right and it makes sense and you cant depreciate ones own labor but you can replace a lot of payments. Old equipment has times it can be challenging but doesn't mean it cant function right especially when much of the use is rather sporadic. Usually when I get something fixed up I can keep it that way a long time.
              I find I can work my way around many complicated problems as rare as they are but the daily grind I am well tooled for, battery tools, plumbed in hot hi pressure washer, air tools, gobs of hand stuff, hoist, etc. .
              Last edited by Sberry; 10-14-2011, 04:10 PM.

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              • #22
                The stuff isn't any good if it takes an hour to get it out to make a tack, well worth it for a lot of guys to tailor a recept or 2 if they will really be using the equipment. Thats kind of my interest in these threads, its about the utilities, does the thing work WHEN and WHERE I want it to. Having to green acres cords and hoses just adds one more step when things are already hard enough and taxing ambition. Migs have greatly added to ease of so many jobs.
                Battery tools have been a Godsend too. Made life so much easier when it reduced the need to drag a cord around. People often think puter when they think hi tech but battery's and power drive fasteners have been revolutionary.

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