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Can I use hole saw for 1.125" hole in 3/4" steel plate?

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  • #16
    thing about a hole saw and a hand drill, if the pilot bit cant hold the saw steady (from walking around) you wont ever drill a hole with a hole saw through that heavy of material.... you cant really even use an annular cutter for that either..... best bet, buy/ borrow a torch or plasma cutter, steady yourself and make the hole a better one.... you are in a bit of a pickle with not being able to transport this piece to a machine shop so why not use your welder and build a trailer to haul the piece to a machine shop behind yer lil vw.... you would acutally be much headaches ahead going this route..... just sayin
    welder_one

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
    www.sicfabrications.com

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    • #17
      I cut them all the time with a hole saw,,,one of the reasons is speed. That may sound funny but it isn't, by the time one figures how to get rigged and every option I am done. When practical I use a bit of oil, few drops of rapid tap every 1/8 thickness. Up to 1.25 or so I do them with battery drill, after that size it becomes a bit slower process but my bud recently did the 20 hole. 1 1/2 inch thing in 1/2 in about an hour or so in a press. I did some 3/4 in 1 inch a while back, cooled with water.
      In the pic below I cut these 1 1/8, several of them and average about a minute, have done it in as little as 40 seconds with the pilot hole already there. Click image for larger version

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      Got to agree, if you are just plugging them you are wasting effort drilling, weld them shut, maybe make a plug first, drive a couple flat washers in hole to give a head start..
      Last edited by Sberry; 08-07-2011, 06:36 AM.

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      • #18
        Just cut a plug to fit the holes and weld them in.

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        • #19
          i would'nt enlarge the holes just clean the slag from the plaz and weld em up. if you are trying to keep it flat and worried about it warping leave them. its free who cares if it has a couple holes. i agree with other post, if you cant make use of the pilot bit the hole saw is going to be a hard cut but they are fast and easy just keep it cool and it will sail.

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          • #20
            As to a base for your table, consider using one of those Black and Decker work mate benches. I took a 3/8" plate about your 2X4 foot size, welded some 1/2" bolts to the bottom where the holes are for the little plastic stops that come with the bench. Drop the plate on with bolts lined up with holes, widen the table a bit to cinch it down and it makes a great table. Need room in your garage, just loosen the table top, fold up the bench and lean it all against the wall.

            Good luck

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Blboise View Post
              As to a base for your table, consider using one of those Black and Decker work mate benches. I took a 3/8" plate about your 2X4 foot size, welded some 1/2" bolts to the bottom where the holes are for the little plastic stops that come with the bench. Drop the plate on with bolts lined up with holes, widen the table a bit to cinch it down and it makes a great table. Need room in your garage, just loosen the table top, fold up the bench and lean it all against the wall.

              Good luck
              Good tip - but it's 3/4" thick and the weight of this thing is a bit scary for me. I can barely lift the end of it with it sitting on a large wheeled dolly I made from 2x8s and I'm scared I'll jam my finger underneath it if I slip. I have some levelling casters that will handle the weight and plan to use them under the legs. When screwed down, they take the caster wheel right off the ground and it should be plenty solid.

              I was out in the yard fiddling with this plate tonight trying to figure out a way to remove some rust and mill scale. The rust disappeared pretty quick with the wire cup on an angle grinder, but it then left piles of little "divots" in the mill scale. I suppose some fiber disk might chew through the scale, but I don't want something that will be so aggressive that it will go through the scale and then gouge the metal underneath.

              Anyway, thanks for the tip - I am going to save that workmate idea for another small work surface I need in the garage where I can use much thinner material.

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              • #22
                I'd consider doing nothing to the holes until it was convenient. You could just mount it as a table and leave the holes rough until a convenient tool such as a cutting torch is available.

                Holes are nice to support parts when knocking out bearings or bushings. You'll find uses for them.

                I'd throw a stout angle iron frame under it then put it to work. Fast, cheap, strong.

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