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Stainless Steel oxy-acetilene welding, how-to?

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  • Stainless Steel oxy-acetilene welding, how-to?

    Hello,

    Please explain me how to do oxy-acetylene welding of stainless steel, I used the right flux which is only for it, but I couldn't do it, where I applied the torch it looks like coal.

    Thanks
    Regards

    Marcelo

  • #2
    I'm not completely sure myself but, I think your coal like appearance is oxidation. Check your flame is correct. I would use a nuetral flame or even slightly carbourising.

    Nick

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    • #3
      I tried with a flame with a lot of acetylene and then I tried with less, but I still have the same problem. If I keep it for too long it looks like coal, if I don't keep it that long, the rod that melts won't mix with the base material and will make little balls.

      Thanks
      Regards

      Marcelo

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      • #4
        Hi,I have very less experience in this field but still I think nuetral flame or even slightly carbourising might help you.
        Film Industry Truck Hire

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        • #5
          You can't weld stainless with oxy fuel with decent results. However, it does silver braze very nicely.

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          • #6
            You certainly can oxy stainless read on

            http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=39593

            Ronnie

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GTA/SPEC View Post
              You can't weld stainless with oxy fuel with decent results. However, it does silver braze very nicely.
              Ahhhhhhh wrong......


              Anyway the key to ferro/nickel alloys is technique. The torch does not circle or have any pattern.

              1-Flux the parts and rod.
              2-Use a tip the same size, or 1 smaller than you would for steel.
              3-Neutral to a 1x reducing flame.
              4-Bring the torch in fast, start the puddle with a steady motion.
              5-Filler is kept in the outer envelope and "drawn off" into the weld pool with very tiny movements.
              6-Progress the weld with a steady torch, let the puddle grow on its own.
              7-Draw the torch off slowly when finished
              8-If you have to stop and re-start a weld, re-flux where you stopped/started

              Big No-No's-

              1-FLicking the torch in and out of the puddle
              2-Dabbing the filler in and out of the outer envelope
              3-Torch Circles
              4-Oxidizing flame
              "Better Metalworking Through Research"

              Miller Dynasty 300DX
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              • #8
                @ Aerometalworker

                Now that is the best response to a person’s question I have seen in a long time. Now if we could all take this as an example of how to respond to someone's question...ah, what a helpful place this would be. (Self-included)
                Write or wrong I don't know but you have set the bar high. Thank you for setting such an example of professionalism and class.
                Last edited by Doughboyracer; 08-04-2011, 01:59 PM.
                MillerMatic 211 Auto-set w/MVP
                Just For Home Projects.

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                • #9
                  Thanks!
                  When teaching students I have found that a written "checklist" for a procedure can mentally prepare someone for a given task. Sometimes too much detail can bog down the process and should be left to after the person is at least versed on the basics. Hope this helps the OP!

                  P.S. I had one thought after I made my original post. Make sure the torch tip is in good shape, meaning that the flame is nice and quiet. A dirty tip or poorly made tip will cause a "harsh" flame that brings in outside air to the weld pool.
                  "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                  Miller Dynasty 300DX
                  Miller Dynasty 200DX
                  Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                  Miller Millermatic Passport

                  Miller Spot Welder
                  Motor-Guard stud welder

                  Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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