Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

preventing electrode rust

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • HayFarmer
    started a topic preventing electrode rust

    preventing electrode rust

    My weld shop is outdoors and here spring, summer and early fall are screaming hot and humid. I store electrodes (spooled wire and stick) indoors in a dehumidified area but still they wind up in the humidity for long periods. Id like to completely prevent rush or at least retard it but Ive found the dehumidified room isn't always enough. I thought about storing them in a smaller insulated box which would be kept warm but Im not sure if that would be anymore effective than what Im already doing. Also wondered if boxing them w/ some of the rush inhibiting paper would be good. Wasn't sure tho if the 'vapors' given off by the paper would cause weld defects. All of the spooled wire is non-coated some of which doesn't get used up quickly (like hardface wire). Any ideas/suggestions would be appreciated.

  • Nitesky
    replied
    I used to have the same problem. Now I just store my rods and wire in the basement. Problem was caused by condensation (dew) that is brought on my temperature change.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bushytails
    replied
    For storing wire, try an ammo can of the appropriate size for the spool and a sock filled with silica gel desiccant. Ammo cans are the cheapest airtight boxes you can get and come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, and the desiccant will keep the air in it completely dry as long as the lid is closed. You can get silica gel lots of places, either for tools, guns, or for air line dryers for painting. Many of them, such as the air dryer stuff I got, changes color as it absorbs moisture, so you know when it's time to replace or bake it.

    --Bushytails

    Leave a comment:


  • HayFarmer
    replied
    Yes, I was looking at the tin Midway sells. Its all self contained, easily recharged and might fit inside my feeder.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    [QUOTE=jbmprods;268563]i use a clay based air drying agent called "Damp Gone" made by Rutland. i buy it in a ten pound box and break it down in some tiny bags (size of the old Bull Durham bags) i had my niece sew up for me with Velcro closures. i put one in my rod tubes and it absorbs the moisture. periodically i take the out and dump the clay on a cookie sheet and stick it in the oven for an hour or so and dry it out and it's good to go for a few more months." Quote end jbmprods]

    Above: partial quote from post by jbmprods

    My response below:

    I have not used the Damp Gone, but it sounds like a lot like a reusable silica gel. I pick the silcia gel baggies out of shipping packages. sometimes they are even found in tennis shoe boxes. They are almost found in abundance where electronic instrumentation is shipped. It can also be purchased in quantities. Do a Google search. I believe some brands of silica gel are oven bakeable and reusable. I too use it in gun safes, rod tubes, watch and jewelery draws, etc.

    Thanks for the tip on Damp Gone. I may try some.

    HAWK

    Leave a comment:


  • jbmprods
    replied
    i use a clay based air drying agent called "Damp Gone" made by Rutland. i buy it in a ten pound box and break it down in some tiny bags (size of the old Bull Durham bags) i had my niece sew up for me with Velcro closures. i put one in my rod tubes and it absorbs the moisture. periodically i take the out and dump the clay on a cookie sheet and stick it in the oven for an hour or so and dry it out and it's good to go for a few more months. depending on the humidity determines how often you need to reactive it. good stuff though. i use it in my gun safe as a backup to the dryer.

    p.s. for larger jobs steal the wife or gf's pantyhose. just be sure they are not crotchless, and they are the brand and style she wears.
    Last edited by jbmprods; 07-08-2011, 10:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Originally posted by HayFarmer View Post
    So you all are talking about a goldenrod type thingie? Hadn't thought about that and it seems a good idea esp since its built for an enclosed area. I would like to know more about the rust inhibiting paper tho b/c it requires no power and can go anywhere. Im just not sure it wont contaminate the filler in some way.
    I've purchased wires packaged in paper soiled in some type of rust inhibiting chemical. I believe the wire was 44lb spools of National Standard un-coated solid wire. Not flux core. Maybe you can do a little research through National Standard. Call their tech dept and see what paper they use if they will tell you. I don't see see where that information would be classified in anyway. They, National Standard, may wrap others wires as well. A phone call can't hurt.

    Good Luck,

    HAWK

    Leave a comment:


  • HayFarmer
    replied
    So you all are talking about a goldenrod type thingie? Hadn't thought about that and it seems a good idea esp since its built for an enclosed area. I would like to know more about the rust inhibiting paper tho b/c it requires no power and can go anywhere. Im just not sure it wont contaminate the filler in some way.

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    Originally posted by Helios View Post
    Check out gun safe heaters. They only use a tiny amount of power (12W?) but they get the job done, if you have an enclosed area. And they also last longer than light bulbs.
    That's an excellent idea. They, the manufacturers, make them in a couple of sizes: small and large. It seems like they cost about $20-$30. They are designed specifically to keep a gun safe or other similar sized enclosed area at a constant temperature to ward of humidity which causes guns to gather surface rust as well as on their internal mechanisms. They are designed to be placed near the bottom of the enclosure since heat rises and this causes the air to circulate as well as be warm.

    HAWK
    Last edited by HAWK; 07-08-2011, 11:48 AM. Reason: spelling

    Leave a comment:


  • Helios
    replied
    Check out gun safe heaters. They only use a tiny amount of power (12W?) but they get the job done, if you have an enclosed area. And they also last longer than light bulbs.

    Leave a comment:


  • kswelderman
    replied
    weld more often ! just kidding around

    Leave a comment:


  • nfinch86
    replied
    You could try an old refidgerator, with a light bulb inside running 24/7 as I do .

    No rust or humidity seen in the last 3-4 years !
    I have a 40 watt bulb running around the clock !

    ........Norm

    Leave a comment:


  • HAWK
    replied
    I used to use an old refrigerator with a 100 watt incandescent light bulb for general purpose storage of wire and electrodes. Of course any opened lo-hi rods are oven stored then transported to work site in a 110vac rod oven.

    Good Luck,

    HAWK

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X