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  • Starting to get bumbed out over TIG....

    I recently bought a Syncro 200 to do home/hobby Tig projects. I have been doing gas for years and Mig for 10-15 years. I am not the best but not bad either. I want the Tig because I love the look of Tig welds - small clean etc....

    I went all in for home use, could of gone Diverson but went Syncro instead figuring it would offer more flexibility as well.

    I watched Utube videos and ordered the course from Miller....looks easy but didn't help. The more I try to lay down practice beads, the worse I seem to get. I did sign up for a welding class at the local JC - it is farm and ranch class 2 nights/week for 3 hours each for 5 weeks. 10 students in class and the instructor will work with you on your projects. The next regular class I could get into was Sept for certifications or career welding.

    This is my goal, to be able to weld like these...
    http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/r...35-625x352.jpg
    http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/r...19-625x352.jpg
    http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/r...44-625x352.jpg
    Roger Troue

    Retired since 2004

    Miller 211
    Miller 200 Syncro
    Miller 375 Extreme

  • #2
    Hang in there! Rome wasn't built in a day.
    Learn tempo and rhythm. It helps when tig welding.
    Also, aim higher. Those welds pictured look like poopies.
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    • #3
      That isn't that bad. Just a little hot.
      Miller Dynasty 700
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      • #4
        Originally posted by fire1hawk View Post
        That isn't that bad. Just a little hot.
        Those aren't mine...I would like to do this good right now.
        Roger Troue

        Retired since 2004

        Miller 211
        Miller 200 Syncro
        Miller 375 Extreme

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        • #5
          I too was a MIG welder for many years, at an RV manufacturing plant before picking up a TIG torch. Switching to TIG I brought a lot of MIG habits with me. I found it takes practice, practice, practice to re learn to weld TIG. I sometimes think it might have been easier if I'd picked up TIG first. That's been my experience anyway.

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          • #6
            Those welds in the pics are very difficult in fact. You probably are not giving yourself credit on your progress.

            So you have your machine set up, switch metals. Buy some silicon bronze, 308L, and alum filler. Weld some alum, then switch to steel. Try some silicone bronze on steel, then ER70-s2.

            Switching back and forth with different metals and currents takes you out of your comfort zone. Believe it or not, most people I know choose any kind of alum as being the easiest to weld and cheap steel as most difficult. I even find titanium more enjoyable than 1018 or A36.
            Nothing welded, Nothing gained

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TxDarth View Post
              I recently bought a Syncro 200 to do home/hobby Tig projects. I have been doing gas for years and Mig for 10-15 years. I am not the best but not bad either. I want the Tig because I love the look of Tig welds - small clean etc....

              I went all in for home use, could of gone Diverson but went Syncro instead figuring it would offer more flexibility as well.

              I watched Utube videos and ordered the course from Miller....looks easy but didn't help. The more I try to lay down practice beads, the worse I seem to get. I did sign up for a welding class at the local JC - it is farm and ranch class 2 nights/week for 3 hours each for 5 weeks. 10 students in class and the instructor will work with you on your projects. The next regular class I could get into was Sept for certifications or career welding.

              This is my goal, to be able to weld like these...
              http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/r...35-625x352.jpg
              http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/r...19-625x352.jpg
              http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/r...44-625x352.jpg
              I bet the fellow that did these welds has been doing it for some time. They look a tad hot, but he was probably more interested in penetration than looks, they were probably purged on the inside as well.There isnt any substitute for practice and more practice period!

              Watch your instructor to learn the proper procedure and get the basics down to where you dont have to think about it and it will be much easier.

              It isnt a hard process to learn but does take some time.............
              mike sr

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              • #8
                Find someone local who can tig real good & ask him to come over & help you out.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pro70z28 View Post
                  I too was a MIG welder for many years, at an RV manufacturing plant before picking up a TIG torch. Switching to TIG I brought a lot of MIG habits with me. I found it takes practice, practice, practice to re learn to weld TIG. I sometimes think it might have been easier if I'd picked up TIG first. That's been my experience anyway.
                  I did pick up TIG first and have the opposite experience in that I found MIG to be the most difficult for me to learn.
                  Blondie (Owner C & S Automotive)

                  Colt the original point & click interface!

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                  • #10
                    when i first saw the title "how to win friends and influence people" i thought that that was just what i needed. in the end i found it to be too much work lieing to people all the time and went back to my introverted yet honest life. if you dont have the heart for something dont do it.

                    steel with tig was not my first method but i found it easiest to pick up than any other.

                    i take it youve gone through 50 pounds filler and not a couple of rods.

                    you must be doing something very wrong if you can o/a but we dont know what youre doing.

                    are you using o/a filler?

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                    • #11
                      Tiggin for sure takes alot of practice and patience. I would recommend if you want to do piping and such to practice on smaller pipe, it is more difficult. Then go back to bigger pipe and practice. Keep switching beween the two. We have a young kid at work that is learning how to weld and this is what i had him doing. It helped him alot after the seeing the progress from the little pipe to the big pipe he was much happier and more willing to keep trying. We were using Sch. 80 pipe but i dont see why this wouldnt work on the thin wall pipe. But the most important i think is when you get really frustrated to just walk away, you wont make much progress if you start getting pissed off. Good luck with the welding, and i agree find someone in your area that can tig good and have him show you. Not saying that any kind of school is a waste of time, but i dont think there is anyone that can teach you better then a guy that earns his paycheck doing it everyday.
                      Linclon power mig 350MP

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by shovelon View Post
                        Those welds in the pics are very difficult in fact. You probably are not giving yourself credit on your progress.

                        So you have your machine set up, switch metals. Buy some silicon bronze, 308L, and alum filler. Weld some alum, then switch to steel. Try some silicone bronze on steel, then ER70-s2.

                        Switching back and forth with different metals and currents takes you out of your comfort zone. Believe it or not, most people I know choose any kind of alum as being the easiest to weld and cheap steel as most difficult. I even find titanium more enjoyable than 1018 or A36.
                        Actually, I did try some ER70-S2 the last I bought but with my level of experience I could not tell that much difference. I have not tried Aluminum yet, mostly out of fear, I figured it would be even more difficult.

                        One thing that leads me to believe I am doing something wrong iin my set up is the "pulse control" I don't notice a difference between 5 and 30 pps. I do seem to be contaminating the the tungsten quite often, usually by getting too close or touching the puddle. It is stop and regrind....stop and regrind!

                        Oh, did I mention I am also an old dog 69 - maybe you really can't teach an old dog new tricks.
                        Roger Troue

                        Retired since 2004

                        Miller 211
                        Miller 200 Syncro
                        Miller 375 Extreme

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Turn the pulse off and get the hang of it first then play with the features. Get some AL and try it. I find AL is easier than steel to learn on. Practice practice and more practice. Hang in there. It will all come to you. I believe you can teach old dogs new tricks! No offense.

                          Steve
                          Dont force it, use a BIGGER hammer.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TxDarth View Post
                            I do seem to be contaminating the the tungsten quite often, usually by getting too close or touching the puddle. It is stop and regrind....stop and regrind!
                            heh, you're not alone on that one

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TxDarth View Post
                              Actually, I did try some ER70-S2 the last I bought but with my level of experience I could not tell that much difference. I have not tried Aluminum yet, mostly out of fear, I figured it would be even more difficult.

                              One thing that leads me to believe I am doing something wrong iin my set up is the "pulse control" I don't notice a difference between 5 and 30 pps. I do seem to be contaminating the the tungsten quite often, usually by getting too close or touching the puddle. It is stop and regrind....stop and regrind!

                              Oh, did I mention I am also an old dog 69 - maybe you really can't teach an old dog new tricks.
                              I am also one of the over the hill guys, I did learn to tig over 40 years ago and I had stick welded over 10 years before that, there were differences between the two to learn thats for sure.

                              It sounds like you may need some better cheaters, you have to be able to see as near perfect as possible (following the thin line - distance of the tungsten to the work etc) I had Walgreens reader glasses stashed everywhere ha! It will take longer to learn in our age bracket but it can be done! I had a pair of 4.0 cheaters made special that I use now.

                              A few minutes to an hour a day practice is much better than all day once a week.
                              mike sr

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