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  • A359 pipe?

    Just dida test weld for a pipeline job, test was on 12" pipe 10 bead and 7010 hot pass and cap all down hand, I ran a tight 3/32 gap beaded with 1/8 10 rod, 3/16 hotpass, and a 5/32 cap. Halve of the coupon was normal pipe the other halve was A359. I smoked it in hot, maybe a little too hot on my bottom! BUT did notice that it was easy to get undercut on my bead and on my cap, I was able to run l some stringers on my cap but had to cut out my bead to be able run another rod hugging the A359 side of the bead to make it look pretty!

    Seems like A359 likes to give undercut in some places, so why?

    I have been told that A359 steel is the same as cat pipe in grade??
    I don't know anything about $hit like this!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Alberta rig welder View Post
    Just dida test weld for a pipeline job, test was on 12" pipe 10 bead and 7010 hot pass and cap all down hand, I ran a tight 3/32 gap beaded with 1/8 10 rod, 3/16 hotpass, and a 5/32 cap. Halve of the coupon was normal pipe the other halve was A359. I smoked it in hot, maybe a little too hot on my bottom! BUT did notice that it was easy to get undercut on my bead and on my cap, I was able to run l some stringers on my cap but had to cut out my bead to be able run another rod hugging the A359 side of the bead to make it look pretty!

    Seems like A359 likes to give undercut in some places, so why?

    I have been told that A359 steel is the same as cat pipe in grade??
    I don't know anything about $hit like this!
    Google searches do not offer a lot of info on this pipe.
    But the A359 seems to be a stainless pipe and is for high temp service.

    There is some confusion with the numbers.
    SA359, A359-70, ASTM A359 etc.,.
    Will have to keep digging.
    If it is stainless it could be the reason for some undercutting because of the nickel.
    Seems to be used in some refineries.
    I am sure some other pipe welders may have some info.
    Last edited by Donald Branscom; 02-20-2011, 12:35 PM. Reason: spelling

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Donald Branscom View Post
      Google searches do not offer a lot of info on this pipe.
      But the A359 seems to be a stainless pipe and is for high temp service.

      There is some confusion with the numbers.
      SA359, A359-70, ASTM A359 etc.,.
      Will have to keep digging.
      If it is stainless it could be the reason for some undercutting because of the nickel.
      Seems to be used in some refineries.
      I am sure some other pipe welders may have some info.
      The ASTM does not list A359 as steel pipe. It does list A358.
      A358/A358M-01 Standard Specification for Electric-Fusion-Welded Austenitic Chromium-Nickel Alloy Steel Pipe for High-Temperature Service.

      IF the ASTM number says SA instead of S then it is stainless Austinetic=SA designation,not steel.
      cast steel fittings in A359 are available.

      I think what is going on here is that you were welding A358 steel pipe to A359 cast stainless fitting.
      Last edited by Donald Branscom; 02-20-2011, 02:16 PM.

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      • #4
        OK...I found out what A359 is.

        It is a document on testing.
        ASTM A359 - Complete Document
        Revision / Edition: Chg: Date: 00/00/00
        METHODS AND DEFINITIONS FOR MECHANICAL TESTING OF STRUCTURAL STEEL

        Online cost is $47.00 and was super ceded by A370.

        Available at :
        http://global.ihs.com/doc_detail.cfm...put_doc_title=

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        • #5
          "cat pipe." Wonder about that too.
          Does that mean Catlytic converter pipe or CAT like the heavy equipment company?

          If I had been offered that test, I sure would have wanted to know exactly what I was welding before I welded it. Just me.

          I also found out there are 5 classes of A358 pipe and different root pass on class 4.

          Seems like you would have to spend some money on a booklet to really get all the info for this pipe and procedures.
          Last edited by Donald Branscom; 02-20-2011, 02:05 PM.

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          • #6
            The pipeline is a steam line for a SAGD, so it will have hot steam pushed through it. I have talked to some spread bosses and they said it's her high temp and better grade of pipe. I was also told that it's basicaly cat pipe and is harder then say 106.

            Cat pipe is much better grade of pipe and is used in H2S/ severe H2S products and is used in a strick code, which means it's 100% or wrap up and go home!

            I don't really need all the tech Info on the pipe after all I am just a rod burner, welders want to know that kind of stuff! I'll use my liquid propane for preheat and make sure it's good and hot when I weld out the pipe!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Alberta rig welder View Post
              The pipeline is a steam line for a SAGD, so it will have hot steam pushed through it. I have talked to some spread bosses and they said it's her high temp and better grade of pipe. I was also told that it's basicaly cat pipe and is harder then say 106.

              Cat pipe is much better grade of pipe and is used in H2S/ severe H2S products and is used in a strick code, which means it's 100% or wrap up and go home!

              I don't really need all the tech Info on the pipe after all I am just a rod burner, welders want to know that kind of stuff! I'll use my liquid propane for preheat and make sure it's good and hot when I weld out the pipe!
              I understand.
              It is a different world. Do you have a temp crayon in your pocket to know if the pipe is hot enough to weld ? I was thinking if the pipe is too hot maybe that is why you are getting some undercutting.

              Does it get below freezing out there? Oh yeah ....forgot....Alberta Canada LOL!!!

              The temp crayon would probably freeze.
              The temp crayon would have to be preheated??? LOL
              Last edited by Donald Branscom; 02-20-2011, 02:24 PM.

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              • #8
                Donald, the "SA" designation has nothing to do with the metal being stainless, it is the ASME code. "A" is the ASTM code. For example SA/A106 pipe is carbon steel pipe meeting both ASME and ASTM code requirements.
                Chris

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alberta rig welder View Post
                  The pipeline is a steam line for a SAGD, so it will have hot steam pushed through it. I have talked to some spread bosses and they said it's her high temp and better grade of pipe. I was also told that it's basicaly cat pipe and is harder then say 106.

                  Cat pipe is much better grade of pipe and is used in H2S/ severe H2S products and is used in a strick code, which means it's 100% or wrap up and go home!

                  I don't really need all the tech Info on the pipe after all I am just a rod burner, welders want to know that kind of stuff! I'll use my liquid propane for preheat and make sure it's good and hot when I weld out the pipe!
                  How long of a line are you running? We ran 6,500 feet of steam line 2 years ago. It kinda sucks with all the expansion loops and steam traps/mud legs and being shot to B31.1(a pretty tough code here in the US). Ours was 24'' .688 wall & a 10'' STD wall return line. 7 welders working 7/12s, I was pretty well burnt out after that job.

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