Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newb wondering what course to take, please help

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • fjk
    replied
    Originally posted by Rivo View Post
    I hope to enter into this trade...
    IF you were looking at this from a hobby or home-handyman
    perspective, then it's easy -- learn whatever you want. Stick or
    MIG would be the most immediately useful for stuff like fences.


    BUT you say you want to go into welding as a trade.
    As with any career, the more you know, the better off
    you'll be. That means take as many courses in welding
    and related skills (as someone mentioned, print reading,
    welding qc, electrical, etc, etc). As to the sticking-metal-
    together parts of education, start with O/A -- there are some
    real basic, but important, skills to learn and O/A seems to
    be the best for teaching them. Get good at those skills and
    then step up to the various electric processes.

    Also, if you're looking to work on your own, that means you're
    going to run a business -- learn some business skills (particularly
    small business accounting). Also spend some time reading through
    the various threads on these boards -- there's a wealth of information
    and stories about starting and operating your own business. Some of
    the most important are the stories from customers saying why they
    would or would-not hire some weldor again...

    Frank

    Leave a comment:


  • davedarragh
    replied
    Originally posted by Rivo View Post
    Thank you thank you for all your great and helpful replies, I really appreciate all your feedback!!!!

    Dave, I would rather have straight forward opinions rather than sugar coated words that dont help one to make an informed decision.

    I hope to enter into this trade and I hope to buy a miller machine and become a part of this community and hopefully help out someone else in my position in the future the same way you have helped me.
    I'm glad you understand that. Certainly not trying to discourage anyone from entering into this highly skilled trade.

    You should really think about SMAW as a beginning. You can always weld "stick" when the argon bottle is empty, and the wind is blowing 20 mph. FCAW is also paramount.

    How 'bout them Canucks? They're playing some great hockey right now, but the 'Yotes are knocking on the door.

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • Rivo
    replied
    Thank you thank you for all your great and helpful replies, I really appreciate all your feedback!!!!

    Dave, I would rather have straight forward opinions rather than sugar coated words that dont help one to make an informed decision.

    I hope to enter into this trade and I hope to buy a miller machine and become a part of this community and hopefully help out someone else in my position in the future the same way you have helped me.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikejmu
    replied
    In my community the local high school offers the kids courses to go to that specify in this type of work. You could get cheap or free courses if you check with your adult education department at the local high school.

    Leave a comment:


  • PeterTrocewicz
    replied
    BCIT has a good reputation has a good reputation in a lot of fields. I agree with the consesus that if you can take all the courses, do it. Do they offer a 'Welding Techniques' course? That is the course that I took at Conestoga College when I decided to get serious about learning to weld a couple of years ago. It was, though, a 1-year full-time course. However, since I had lost my job in manufacturing during the meltdown, the government paid for it under their retraining programme, as well as paid me EI during the course. It covered oxyfuel cutting brazing and welding, stick, mig, fluxcore, tig, plasma, and air carbon arc. It also covered a lot of theory, such as blueprint reading, metallurgy, weld quality and electrical (with a view to understanding how the machines work). It was a good course, and I made some good contacts in the industry. I've done OK since then taking on small non-critical repair work fabrications.
    If you can only take 1 though, I would be with Shovelon and take the TIG. Oxyfuel would be a good one though if you can take 2 courses. Some of the skills are common to both techniques, an Oxyfuel presents its own safety concerns.

    Leave a comment:


  • davedarragh
    replied
    "Niche Market"

    Originally posted by Rivo View Post
    Thanks for the detailed reply Dave,

    In regards to the couses, they are all only 30 hours, like an intro to the field. If I have a knack for it and find some kind of niche market here in BC, I plan to take a more detailed rigorous course.

    For now, I;'d just like to see if I can weld up my own gates for me and some buddies instead of paying a welder 50-100 bucks an hour.

    I hired a welder at 50/h to fabricate a 10' swing gate and a 12' sliding gate. Both with galvanized corrugated privacy panels that I bolted on my self.

    I watched and helped him and saw that I could easily do all the measuring, cutting etc. the gates were my design not his. After 2 days of this and $650 later, I wasn't really satisfied as he raped both of my 4x4 posts and put tabs on them telling me I'd be fine bolting them into my driveway with paving bricks and dont have to dig holes and cememt them now

    I figured mebbe I can get away with a $525 course, rent a tig welder for $225/week and come out on top after I fab up a ton of panels for me and my circle of people....

    YAY SAVE MONEY!!!!
    Nice looking gate. Now, back to reality. Not to be a wet blanket, and nothing wrong with "lofty" goals. However, remember, you're going up against Red Seal Certified Tradesmen in your Province, who already have a "Niche Market," that are probably doing other things to keep food on the table and the bills paid.

    If you really want to pursue this, and have unquestionably quality work, take ALL the courses. If you can afford to rent a TIG @ $225/week, in 2 weeks of rental, you can learn another process.

    I appreciate your enthusiasm, and your eagerness is admirable. Welding code quality work, doesn't happen with a "quick course" and renting a machine. It comes with UNDERSTANDING and APPLICATION. You have a responsibility of liability, regardless if you charge your buddies $$$$, or if it's cases of beer.

    There's going to be areas of metallurgy you may not grasp at first, and you can't just "blow it off," and jump to what appeals to you. I don't mean to sound crass, BUT, welding is a serious business, and should be approached with the same reverence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rivo
    replied
    Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
    You've asked several questions here. The fundamentals of ALL welding begin with O/A and SMAW. Learn to use a cutting torch (not a plasma), and O/A weld. The same body mechanics apply when learning GTAW.

    SMAW is the most important process you can learn. You will learn the differences between cellulose, rutile, iron powder, and "lo-hydrogen" fluxes/rods, out-of-position welds, and rod manipulation/puddle control. "Stick" welding is the "king," regardless if it's out in the field, or hardfacing in a shop.

    GMAW- this includes FCAW-g and ss. If the course is taught correctly, you'll learn the 3 basic transfer modes of GMAW (short-arc, globular, and spray), and then FCAW gas and self shielded. Innershield is becoming increasingly more popular, due to it's higher depostion rates and advances in multi-process engine drives.

    GTAW will be the last you should learn, as it is the most advanced. Included in each of the process, will be "Electricity in Welding." This is very important when learning TIG, understanding the arc ionization, and flow of electrons when welding non-ferrous metals.

    As for your fence, you've mixed three different metals in your design (aluminum, galvinized, steel). For large gates, use a guy wire for support, or use rolling gates on an inverted angle track.

    Good luck in your classes, you'll soon discover; "I didn't know welding was all about that................"
    Thanks for the detailed reply Dave,

    In regards to the couses, they are all only 30 hours, like an intro to the field. If I have a knack for it and find some kind of niche market here in BC, I plan to take a more detailed rigorous course.

    For now, I;'d just like to see if I can weld up my own gates for me and some buddies instead of paying a welder 50-100 bucks an hour.

    I hired a welder at 50/h to fabricate a 10' swing gate and a 12' sliding gate. Both with galvanized corrugated privacy panels that I bolted on my self.

    I watched and helped him and saw that I could easily do all the measuring, cutting etc. the gates were my design not his. After 2 days of this and $650 later, I wasn't really satisfied as he raped both of my 4x4 posts and put tabs on them telling me I'd be fine bolting them into my driveway with paving bricks and dont have to dig holes and cememt them now

    I figured mebbe I can get away with a $525 course, rent a tig welder for $225/week and come out on top after I fab up a ton of panels for me and my circle of people....

    YAY SAVE MONEY!!!!
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Rivo
    replied
    Originally posted by shovelon View Post
    If tig and mig are your only options, and they are separate classes, take tig.

    Mig you can learn on your own after some hours of intense tig schooling. Doesn't work the other way around.
    ty shovelon

    Leave a comment:


  • Rivo
    replied
    Originally posted by fjk View Post
    Are you looking to weld for a living or are you doing it more for
    personal projects/etc?

    What are the course options to choose from?

    Where are the courses being taught?
    Hi, thanks for reply

    I think if I am any good at it I may consider having a go at it.

    Course options are
    http://www.bcit.ca/study/courses/weld0110 TIG
    http://www.bcit.ca/study/courses/weld0115 aluminum
    http://www.bcit.ca/study/courses/weld0103 Oxy/braze
    http://www.bcit.ca/study/courses/weld0104 stick
    http://www.bcit.ca/study/courses/weld0106 Mig

    I do not have any prior experience with any kind of welding.

    Leave a comment:


  • davedarragh
    replied
    Originally posted by Rivo View Post
    Hello,

    I have been wanting to take an intro to welding but have minimal knowledge about what course to take. I am just starting out into this field and hope to make a good run at it.

    I would like to weld up some gates and fences for me and my family/friends.
    Aluminum framed privacy galvanized steel panel gates and the same privacy panels bolted onto steel cross rails with steel 4x4 posts for the fence sections. Probably going to make about 2000 linear feet. Do you think large swing and sliding gates dictate the use of aluminum to reduce weight or should I focus on steel alone?

    What type course would you recommend, TIG, MIG? suggestions

    Thanks for your replies, I really need some because the courses start on the 19th and 20th
    You've asked several questions here. The fundamentals of ALL welding begin with O/A and SMAW. Learn to use a cutting torch (not a plasma), and O/A weld. The same body mechanics apply when learning GTAW.

    SMAW is the most important process you can learn. You will learn the differences between cellulose, rutile, iron powder, and "lo-hydrogen" fluxes/rods, out-of-position welds, and rod manipulation/puddle control. "Stick" welding is the "king," regardless if it's out in the field, or hardfacing in a shop.

    GMAW- this includes FCAW-g and ss. If the course is taught correctly, you'll learn the 3 basic transfer modes of GMAW (short-arc, globular, and spray), and then FCAW gas and self shielded. Innershield is becoming increasingly more popular, due to it's higher depostion rates and advances in multi-process engine drives.

    GTAW will be the last you should learn, as it is the most advanced. Included in each of the process, will be "Electricity in Welding." This is very important when learning TIG, understanding the arc ionization, and flow of electrons when welding non-ferrous metals.

    As for your fence, you've mixed three different metals in your design (aluminum, galvinized, steel). For large gates, use a guy wire for support, or use rolling gates on an inverted angle track.

    Good luck in your classes, you'll soon discover; "I didn't know welding was all about that................"

    Leave a comment:


  • shovelon
    replied
    If tig and mig are your only options, and they are separate classes, take tig.

    Mig you can learn on your own after some hours of intense tig schooling. Doesn't work the other way around.

    Leave a comment:


  • fjk
    replied
    Are you looking to weld for a living or are you doing it more for
    personal projects/etc?

    What are the course options to choose from?

    Where are the courses being taught?

    Leave a comment:


  • Rivo
    started a topic Newb wondering what course to take, please help

    Newb wondering what course to take, please help

    Hello,

    I have been wanting to take an intro to welding but have minimal knowledge about what course to take. I am just starting out into this field and hope to make a good run at it.

    I would like to weld up some gates and fences for me and my family/friends.
    Aluminum framed privacy galvanized steel panel gates and the same privacy panels bolted onto steel cross rails with steel 4x4 posts for the fence sections. Probably going to make about 2000 linear feet. Do you think large swing and sliding gates dictate the use of aluminum to reduce weight or should I focus on steel alone?

    What type course would you recommend, TIG, MIG? suggestions

    Thanks for your replies, I really need some because the courses start on the 19th and 20th
Working...
X