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Silicon Bronze Food Safe?

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  • Helios
    replied
    Originally posted by spotsineyes View Post
    Silver solder.
    A lot of silver solder alloys contain lead and/or cadmium...and neither of those are very good to eat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy
    replied
    I would probably try a mechanical connection. How thick is your 8" pipe. Can you get a local machine shop to turn threads on it? If it's too thin you might try rolling a flange on the end so I can be clamped. I looked at mcmaster for some copper sweat-to-thread adapters but they didn't have anything as big as 8". There's nothing that says the column-to-boiler connection needs to be 8". You could reduce that side to something where you can get common fittings. Or course this causes a little turbulence as the vapor comes rushing out the opening. Use a stainless wire mesh screen to equalize this. If you're running plates or packing those will probably work fine if you just have a little empty space right above the boiler connection. If it's a pot still you probably don't care about turbulence since there's no gradual temperature gradient to maintain.

    How'd you go about getting the permit?

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  • Donald Branscom
    replied
    Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
    I pretty sure silicon bronze is a pour choice, The silicon bronze will stick to the copper just fine but not to the stainless.

    20 plus years ago I used my oxy/ acyt. torch to braze some stainless to stainless and the stainless welded okay at first and then it just popped away.

    Silver solder with a 45% silver content is what I use to join the 2 together, There are at least 2 types of flux to use, you want to get high temp flux because the silver melts at a higher temputure.

    I'm not sure if silver solder would be considered food grade or not.
    If the silver solder has lead in it, then it would not be safe.
    Some of the new solder products are lead free.
    We eat from utensils made from silver.
    We eat from stainless utensils.
    We eat from copper pans and bowls.
    Many surgical tools are silver plated stainless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dipsomaniac
    replied
    Originally posted by werntonb View Post
    hey buddy, can I know what is the *****? I didn't get it well. I am slow when it becomes in guessing.
    I will have to space the word out so that the filter won't nix it...

    T...A...B...O...O

    I never knew that it was such a bad word...LOL...

    Leave a comment:


  • popspipes
    replied
    Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
    I love them tri-clover fittings. I had them on my home microbrewery system, and cleaning was a snap.
    Laddish (Tri-Clover) fittings used to be the best in the industry, a few years back then they started manufacturing them in Mexico, so I dont know if the quality is still the same or not.
    When the Japanese and Chinese fittings came on the market years back they were really a pain to weld, they did get better in later years, but still didnt compare to the American made Laddish fittings.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    We might not ever know what ***** is because it won't clear the list of bad words of the spam filter...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • werntonb
    replied
    Originally posted by Dipsomaniac View Post
    Lead is strictly ***** when it comes to food or drink...
    hey buddy, can I know what is the *****? I didn't get it well. I am slow when it becomes in guessing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dipsomaniac
    replied
    Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
    I love them tri-clover fittings. I had them on my home microbrewery system, and cleaning was a snap.

    Hey, I figured someone would have a brewing example for tri-clover fittings. I've seen them used on a dairy farm and an exhaust system for an indoor woodmizer sawmill...

    Leave a comment:


  • Portable Welder
    replied
    As far as joining joining the copper to stainless like I said in my earlier post Silver solder with oxy / acytelene torch is how to do it so dont worry about the tig.

    Back in the summer I had a guy bring me a stainless flange and a copper pipe for a still he was building.

    Leave a comment:


  • usmcruz
    replied
    Originally posted by Dipsomaniac View Post
    Here is a link to a company that makes an 8 inch tri-clover clamping system

    http://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=C...opper%20tubing

    I love them tri-clover fittings. I had them on my home microbrewery system, and cleaning was a snap.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dipsomaniac
    replied
    Here is a link to a company that makes an 8 inch tri-clover clamping system

    http://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l&ai=C...opper%20tubing

    Leave a comment:


  • Dipsomaniac
    replied
    Originally posted by Cartierusm View Post
    No, no spuds or olives. Just ethanol vapor. So what should I use.

    Welding dissimilar metals as a rule is typically not a wise thing to do because of the electrode potential difference between the two metals. Believe it or not the Stainless Steel will begin to pit because it has a more negative potential than copper. I know that there are non-conductive compression fittings for such things but they do have limits on pressure and temperature. Also, what is preventing you from using stainless steel tubing instead of copper? If you use the same material, you will find that welding them will be easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cartierusm
    replied
    No, no spuds or olives. Just ethanol vapor. So what should I use.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sandy
    replied
    No MSDS is going to have a statement like "this is safe" let alone "this is food safe" anywhere on it. Besides the fact that food safe is a terriby huge category. Are you boiling spuds or soaking olives in lye?

    Leave a comment:


  • spotsineyes
    replied
    Silver solder.

    Leave a comment:

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