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  • davedarragh
    replied
    Originally posted by tom37 View Post

    I guess I missed alot growing up. I never knew that the dry ice would turn to co2 gas causing no contamination.
    Yep, Tom, that's what "dry ice" is. Solidified CO2, approx -100F. It transitions (sublimates) from a solid to a gas, bypassing the "liquid" stage. Unlike frozen water (ice) turns to liquid (water), ultimately evaporating (gas). To keep CO2 in a liquid state, it must be kept under pressure. In welding (or the food industry), the liquid turns to a gas as it expands when the pressure is released (opening the bottle valve).

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  • nfinch86
    replied
    I Totally Agree with your Sig Line . lol

    ........... Norm

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  • JSFAB
    replied
    So, norm, you are now an expert????

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  • tom37
    replied
    I would like to say thanks to everyone that has added to this post.

    I missed chemistry class all together.
    I must admit I am one that thought carbon monoxide is what came out the exhaust. But it makes sense about the car having to be indoors for it to be high levels of carbon monoxide.

    I guess I missed alot growing up. I never knew that the dry ice would turn to co2 gas causing no contamination.

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  • warrenlark
    replied
    Originally posted by jbmprods View Post
    lol yeah it's great for keeping the keg really cold... but if you lay any skin on it you'll need more than burn gel. at minus 109 it is unforgiving. us old dudes remember grabbing a metal ice tray out of the freezer and having to run water on it to get our fingers loose. but dry ice in the tank degrades to pure co2 gas instead of a liquid so it doesn't contaminate the fuel in the tank. it isn't very costly either at the cost of fuel and gas this day it helps.
    YEAH JBMPRODS, I used to work in the oil fields years ago with a pipe fitter. I remember he and I went to repair a D.O.T. line that had a hole in it. We were hanging by harnesses to do the repair. We had to cut out an elbow and weld in a new one. We had to pack the line with dry ice and also we had to mix up some kind of gel (i don't remember what it was). I remember being scared $%%#less hoping it wouldn't blow. LOL. But I know both the gel and dry ice would vaporize and the line would be open again after awhile... They shut the pipe down but with miles and miles of line it would be impossible to purge.
    Last edited by warrenlark; 01-24-2011, 08:36 PM.

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  • jbmprods
    replied
    lol yeah it's great for keeping the keg really cold... but if you lay any skin on it you'll need more than burn gel. at minus 109 it is unforgiving. us old dudes remember grabbing a metal ice tray out of the freezer and having to run water on it to get our fingers loose. but dry ice in the tank degrades to pure co2 gas instead of a liquid so it doesn't contaminate the fuel in the tank. it isn't very costly either at the cost of fuel and gas this day it helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • nfinch86
    replied
    Dry Ice - Cool Idea !

    Originally posted by popspipes View Post
    Thanks for making this post Norm, some very good information!

    I have often wondered about the electric fuel pumps in our gas tanks, I would like to know what these fellows thinking is on this? The fuel pumps I have changed have had push on connectors on them, it just doesnt seem like a good idea having a possibility of a sparking connector in a gasoline tank. I am thinking that the vapor pressure keeps the o2 levels low enough in a closed system possibly??

    I have used argon to purge a gasoline tank because I had it, I also like the dry ice but havent tried it.
    Pops, Yep, It's been an interesting thread.
    I've never tried nor heard of using dry ice before, Cool. Lol .
    Pun intended !

    .......... Norm

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  • popspipes
    replied
    Thanks for making this post Norm, some very good information!

    I have often wondered about the electric fuel pumps in our gas tanks, I would like to know what these fellows thinking is on this? The fuel pumps I have changed have had push on connectors on them, it just doesnt seem like a good idea having a possibility of a sparking connector in a gasoline tank. I am thinking that the vapor pressure keeps the o2 levels low enough in a closed system possibly??

    I have used argon to purge a gasoline tank because I had it, I also like the dry ice but havent tried it.

    Leave a comment:


  • nfinch86
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Miller View Post
    Norm, That's what I should have done, instead of chasing the hole round and round.
    I guess hind sight is always 20-20.
    Good Luck,
    Bob

    Edit: Just wait till next time then I'll do it right.
    Bob; Yes, as with most if not all welding jobs the prep takes longer than the weld.
    To weld the patch , was maybe 30 seconds . lol .

    ............. Norm

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  • Daniel
    replied
    Thanks for the info, very interesting. Putting exhaust fume in a fuel cell is basically filling it up with inert gas, we use CO2 at the shop for this type of job.

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  • spotsineyes
    replied
    It is a false collective belief that what you are filling the tank with is carbon monoxide. Any gasoline engine that is running normally and is fuel injected produces little to no CO. Check your emissions test report. If you want to make CO, you have to have the garage door closed, so that the available oxygen to the engine begins to deplete, and it is breathing in a large percentage of exhaust. It is poor, or incomplete combustion that produces CO. If you have a problem with your furnace, it is only when the O2 starts dropping that CO starts being produced. That is why you don't have to have a flue pipe on a gas stove. Think about it: all the stove burners and the oven are running, at +- 35,000 BTU, yet how often does the chef get CO poisoning? That is because the combustion is complete.
    What you're filling the tank with when you use your exhaust is mostly atmosphere that has had the oxygen removed by the engine, and replaced by the product of the chemical reaction between the fuel and oxygen: carbon dioxide. At about 19% in a well tuned engine, it is about 100 times more concentrated than what naturally occurs in the atmosphere. The rest of the exhaust is mostly nitrogen, and small percentages of oxides of nitrogen and unburned hydrocarbons. If your engine has an occasional misfire, which you will smell, then there will be traces of oxygen, and carbon monoxide in the exhaust.
    It is the lack of oxygen in the that makes this method work. I am glad to have the opportunity to this rant, even though I know full well that everybody is still going to say "hook up your exhaust and fill the tank with carbon monoxide".
    Thanks for listening.

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  • Bob Miller
    replied
    Norm, That's what I should have done, instead of chasing the hole round and round.
    I guess hind sight is always 20-20.
    Good Luck,
    Bob

    Edit: Just wait till next time then I'll do it right.
    Last edited by Bob Miller; 01-23-2011, 09:03 AM.

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  • nfinch86
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Miller View Post
    I did a tank from my nephew. I used Ar to purge and tigged it up. I should have put a patch over the hole, that would have been easier. The hole was about the size of a fifty cent piece.
    Good Luck,
    Bob
    Bob,I had some 1/4"x 5" Aluminum FB., so I cut a piece 2"x2" cleaned everything up real good. S.S. Wire brush & acetone , then welded her up, Nice !

    ............ Norm

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  • warrenlark
    replied
    Originally posted by jbmprods View Post
    i punched a 2" hole about mid way down in the front of my left tank on my KW when i found a piece of steel some nice feller left in the road for me. .
    I hate it when that happens. You are right, if there were Carbon Monoxide in diesel, we would all be dead.

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  • Bob Miller
    replied
    Argon

    I did a tank from my nephew. I used Ar to purge and tigged it up. I should have put a patch over the hole, that would have been easier. The hole was about the size of a fifty cent piece.
    Good Luck,
    Bob

    Leave a comment:

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