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  • #31
    Originally posted by 7A749 View Post
    I'm done talking

    .

    ?????

    But, but,,, it was just starting to get good!!! I thought this was gonna become the "bash JT" thread .....

    I'm just standing on the sidelines ....
    Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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    • #32
      Naaahhhh...

      Soooo not worth my time.

      He already knows what I think of him.

      There's enough other guys waiting in the wings that will fight the next flame war just fine....
      So you're telling me...You're not nostalgic? Then, give me another word for it......

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
        You want us to believe you have such a vast amount of knowledge in welding and Lincoln welders, but yet you don’t volunteer any help. Perfect example is this thread. You were itching to get involved, and make your presence known but by nature you couldn’t / wouldn’t post anything constructive to help showdog, you just wanted to jump on me because in your opinion I didn’t use the term “Old School” Properly.
        Sounds like a typical 798 hand to me.
        '08 F-350
        Vantage 400
        SA-250
        SA-200
        Invertec V350Pro
        Invertec V205T-AC/DC

        Miller 12VS suitcase
        Miller spectrum 2050

        Pipe beveler's
        Track torch

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        • #34
          As for cleaning fuel tanks, one of the hot rodding magazines had an interesting short article recently on flexible fuel lines and how much more quickly they deteriorate in these days of ethanol and other additives to pump gas. The article talks about the better grade of racing fuel line, and the top-grade Teflon-lined stuff. Ordinary automotive-grade hose is good enough as long as it's understood that eventually it will start shedding little particles, so this is a part that ought to be replaced every few years on a preemptive basis.

          Meanwhile, most mechanically savvy folks know that the ethanol in gasoline will gradually absorb moisture out of the air, rusting tanks and hard lines, plugging carburetor passages and injectors, and corroding what doesn't rust. I'm not for or against ethanol here, just that it means we have to pay attention to its peculiarities. Best to have the tank full if the machine is sitting long, which always was a good idea for avoiding condensation.

          Those old fuel-line Gascolators, with a glass, see-through moisture trap were a good deal for spotting flakes of rust as well as water in the fuel, if you can find one; put it upstream from your filter and any pump.

          I'm picking up a 40-plus year old step-van in a few days, and even though it's running fine, I think I'll pull the tank and do the hillybilly clean-up (after first dunking it in the hot-tank). I wouldn't want to take a chance on a coating, but sloshing some rust-converter (acid, followed by a neutralizer) over the bottom of the tank is normal practice.

          And I'll put just a little 2-stroke premix oil in with the first tank of fresh fuel, just to spread a little oil over the inside of the tank and lines . . . valve-stems and guides and rings and grooves don't mind a little extra lube delivered via the fuel, either, especially when starting an engine that hasn't been run recently.
          Last edited by seattle smitty; 12-09-2010, 10:13 PM.

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          • #35
            Ethanol !

            seattle, I started using Shell Premium 93 octane gas in my welder, there's "No Ethanol" in it at all !
            I sure costs more, But with all the bad things I heard about Ethanol in gasoline, well there's No Way I'm going to use regular gasoline in my 2009 Lincoln !

            .......... Norm
            www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

            Comment


            • #36
              [QUOTE=Showdog75;253439]Not to funny from my point of view. Sonora was giving me some VERY helpful suggestions then this bozo comes along and fouls it all up. I would be ok with a little bs if this yahoo was giving some useful information himself but as has been pointed out he is worthless as far as giving anything of contributing value. Get a life.

              QUOTE]


              You've already got the correct answer.
              Go to the AWS forum, the SA200 section, and you can ask your questions of people, several of them, who have worked on hundreds or thousands of SA200's over the last few decades. That's how they make a living.
              I can't provide any "usefull information" beyond that because I've only worked on the few machines I've owned, keeping them running.
              Talk to experts, it saves time.

              Bozo (or Yahoo, whichever you prefer).
              Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
                ?????

                I thought this was gonna become the "bash JT" thread

                Cool.

                Bozo
                Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                Comment


                • #38
                  [QUOTE=JTMcC;253278]
                  Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
                  That is old school. QUOTE]


                  Where is that old school?
                  Because some idiot(s) did it in the past doesn't make it old school. Or even well intentioned but uninformed dudes.
                  The people who own and make a living with these machines have always carried a number of rocks.
                  You insult the old timers who really knew better, may they rest in peace wherever they ended up.

                  JTMcC.

                  I talked to a guy yesterday that makes a living working on these things. He told me sandpaper would be fine to clean the commutator if I didn't have a stone. Bill Sellon is his name , reckon he knows what he's talking about ? I thought so.
                  Dynasty 200DX "Blue Lightning"
                  Bernard 3500ss water-cooler
                  Rockwell vertical mill
                  Beverly Shear B-3
                  Beverly Shear JR
                  Home-made English wheel
                  Milwaukee Porta-band
                  " Sawz-all
                  Tennsmith 36" stomp shear
                  Fixer upper 1968 Redface Lincoln sa200
                  Powcon 300st

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    [QUOTE=Showdog75;255313]
                    Originally posted by JTMcC View Post


                    I talked to a guy yesterday that makes a living working on these things. He told me sandpaper would be fine to clean the commutator if I didn't have a stone. Bill Sellon is his name , reckon he knows what he's talking about ? I thought so.


                    Uh, "you thought so" what? I always get somewhat lost when internet posters start to both ask, and answer their own questions.
                    But anyway, you can use sandpaper if you want. You can use an Arkansas stone or a pipeliner file if you want or even a rock you found beside the road. These things have been done. But if long term reliability is a goal you're better off doing it right & proper.
                    You CAN clean your spark plugs with a wire wheel on a 4" grinder, then wire the hood on with a coat hanger and put a new coat of house paint on the machine using a mop. Possibilities are endless.
                    But most people depending on their machine to feed the kids won't do any of those things.
                    Good luck with your welding machine and hopefully you'll treat it right.

                    Bozo.
                    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      White comstone is used to set new brushes
                      Black Comstone is used to remove ridges that yourbrushes may have formed
                      Brown Comestone (actually an abrasive eraser compund) is used to remove the fine lines

                      Although simply to clean the Com, then a extra fine sand paper is ok. Just remember that the com is spinning, wouldn't want to bind your pinkees in there

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I plan on treating this machine right guys. I just got pi$$ed that my thread got derailed by a clash of personality's[if your not contributing shut the f up]. Bill said sandpaper was fine to give it a initial cleaning just to see if the machine is in working order then on to a stone. Btw I do have a stone and plan on using it. Carb is apart for cleaning/rebuild. This thing should run a 100 times better when I get carb finished as it was full of crap to say the least.The project is moving forward at a slow pace[as weather allows] but progress is being made.To be continued.
                        Dynasty 200DX "Blue Lightning"
                        Bernard 3500ss water-cooler
                        Rockwell vertical mill
                        Beverly Shear B-3
                        Beverly Shear JR
                        Home-made English wheel
                        Milwaukee Porta-band
                        " Sawz-all
                        Tennsmith 36" stomp shear
                        Fixer upper 1968 Redface Lincoln sa200
                        Powcon 300st

                        Comment

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