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  • Questions about putting O/A on a truck?

    Ok first one is kind of specific to my area North Texas DFW exactly. I have ALWAYS been told the DOT says you have to carry you Oxy/Acty bottles up and down but I see alot of welders carrying the bottles sideways and on a 45 some times. What’s up with that is that legal? Are there requirements that allow you to carry them sideways or on a 45?

    Carrying them on there side wouldn’t that feel liquid Oxy/Acty in to your torch? Not only would that be dangerous but use allot of Oxy/Acty?
    Just cause I ain't old don't mean I ain't old school.

    "Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity."
    -Gen. George Smith Patton, Jr-

    If you don't like the sparks and flame you can always be a desk jocky pencil pusher.

    You soul better belong to jesus because your @$$ belongs to me.
    -MEGADETH-

  • #2
    My factory Pittsburg tool body came with the O2 cylinder laying down and the acetyline standing up. I think it has to do with the restraint, but I could be way wrong too. As long as it is a factory thing I am sure they know the DOT requirements, but then they could be wrong too, so I would look for a vendor and follow the specs to find the correct answer before I built a headache for later. Just my .02 FWIW
    Bob

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    • #3
      Acetylene has to be used in the vertical position or the additives that stabilize acetylene will be released from the bottle while in use. Carrying oxygen laying down is a space thing for me, I dont want to carry a bottle that sticks a foot over my headache rack. I know DOT's here dont want to see a cylinder valve where it can be knocked off if you drive under something too low.

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      • #4
        From what I've always been told, acet. must be used standing up, like mentioned, because of the stuff thats supposed to stay in the bottom of the tank. As for transport, up here it's illegal for a vehicle to be in operation with valves attached. Must be unhooked -and capped- to be legally transported

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        • #5
          The stuff you guys are refering to is acetone.Its inside the tanks to stabilze the acetylene it becomes highly unstable under high pressure.Hence why you should never set your regulator above 10 psi and that high is only needed to run a rose bud tip,cutting i use 4-5psi. depending on tip size.A tank that has been layed on its side should be stood upright for at least 1hr prior to use to allow the acetone to settle to the bottom of the tank again is what i was always taught in HS 20+ yrs ago.
          BB402D
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          • #6
            If you are just going to use it for heating and cutting, consider propane. I like propane for driving around salvage yards because there is no "slosh issue" as with acetylene.

            I use the same hose/torch/regs (Victor 450s so the internal soft parts are identical between propane and acetylene, you can verify other makes by crossing the part numbers using a Seal Seat catalog or their own catalogs) between propane and acetylene, so I only need to switch tips.

            http://www.sealseat.com/prod01.htm

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            • #7
              I live in the same area as you do and I have always run my truck with oxygen bottle laying horizontal with no issues from anyone. My tank is secured in a locker with the valve head sticking through a bulkhead into a cage. I leave the regulators installed on the bottles and have quick disconnects so I keep my hoses and torch in a locked toolbox. My oxygen bottle locker is built of 3 inch channel framework with 1/4 inch plate all fully welded to the bed. It's going to stay put.



              You can see the other side where I have a locked hatch to allow me to slide the oxygen bottle in and out of the locker. It's secured with a padlock.



              I asked a DPS officer about it once at the coffee shop. He told me the main concern (in their eyes) was that the bottle was securely mounted and the head was protected from damage very well. Mine qualifies in my eyes.

              As mentioned, acetylene needs to be kept at a 45 degree angle or better or else you need to let it settle prior to using it.

              As you can see, I use propane rather than acetylene. It's much more economical, easier to get serviced, and works without any mods to my Victor torch other than a 30 dollar propane tip.

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              • #8
                propane questions now?

                How long can you cut with a little 20 LBS propane if i remeber correct thats the size in the pictures.
                Just cause I ain't old don't mean I ain't old school.

                "Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity."
                -Gen. George Smith Patton, Jr-

                If you don't like the sparks and flame you can always be a desk jocky pencil pusher.

                You soul better belong to jesus because your @$$ belongs to me.
                -MEGADETH-

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've seen a set of yellow valve covers and gauge guards that can supposedly be used to make an O/A rig DOT-approved, even with regulator still mounted. The valve guard screws onto the same threads used by the cylinder cap. Both the gauge guards and the valve guard are made of sheet steel IIRC. I only know one guy who actually used them though. This was in Virginia, if that matters.

                  Ethan
                  Ethan Labowitz
                  Graduate Teaching Assistant
                  Department of Technology
                  Appalachian State University
                  Boone, NC
                  http://tec.appstate.edu

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ayers Garage View Post


                    As you can see, I use propane rather than acetylene. It's much more economical, easier to get serviced, and works without any mods to my Victor torch other than a 30 dollar propane tip.
                    Whats really nice about the Propane tips is if they get slag or something in the hole you just slide the center from the outer tip case and clean it off no tip cleaners needed...Bob
                    Bob Wright

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                    • #11
                      I have seen tips for 10$, as for how long cutting with 20#, not sure but its a long time, probably 3 or 4 125 cf O2 bottles.

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                      • #12
                        I enclosed everything on my service truck, just figure the less one can see the better and I leave the regs on. I had to make a well for the O2 bottles to fit in. I can fit 2 each if needed.
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          I have cutting on my pickup too, use an 80cf bottle and a 20# LP. Don't use it a lot but its there if a crisis comes along. Used it on a job the other day, needed to make cut about 2 ft long and heat a small plate. I keep the torch in a rubber tote underneath the bottle.
                          Attached Files

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                            I enclosed everything on my service truck, just figure the less one can see the better and I leave the regs on. I had to make a well for the O2 bottles to fit in. I can fit 2 each if needed.
                            Sberry, where did you find your truck, and what vintage is it? It appears to be from the 60's era? It looks like you have it set up pretty well, did you configure it yourself or purchase it that way? If you don't mind saying, how much did it cost you, and how long have you had it? How does it run out, does it drive fairly well? That looks like a pretty cool work truck, do you think it would be hard to find a similar one nowadays? It's big, but doesn't appear to be too tall. Thanks!

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                            • #15
                              I'm in norte tejas also. When I set mine up I had three concerns. The first was I wanted to carry two large oxy bottles because you will use large oxy bottles for every 140 cu ft of acetylene when cutting. I was also concerned about ease of handling 150 lb oxy bottles. I was also aware of security and safety.

                              I picked up some roller trays for large nitrogen bottles from a telco utility body. The bottles are the same but the nozzles are different. I was only concerned about the size. I mounted the trays under the welder. This puts three hundred pounds low and in the middle of the truck. It also is easy to change out the bottles because I only have to pick them up six inches to locate the base onto the tray. Then I only have to lift up one end and slide the tray home.

                              The acetylene has to be carried vertical for all the earlier explanations. I had to put a special cavity in the floor of the box to accomplish this. It's also the best kind of lower locator/holder for the tank.

                              My gas system is out of sight, best kind of security precaution. The valves are protected and close together which means I rarely have issues of them being left on.
                              Attached Files
                              life is good

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