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Welding of wind turbine Tower

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  • Matrix
    replied
    Originally posted by scottbart View Post
    Funnily enough i used to weld them together, here is how it was done:

    1) Sheet steel would be placed into giant hydraulic rollers and rolled up to form a "can" that was tack welded along the lengh and then a root weld put in it once it was checked, that weld was with a Mig welder.

    2) Once we had 2 "cans" you would already have 1 can on a set of wheels that turn both ways and was controlled with a pendant. We would have the 2nd can on a "c" hook on an overhead crane, it would be lowered into place. The fitters would then use heavy duty hydraulic jacks and also weld grips onto the can in order to have something for the jacks to push against. Pretty much the can were pushed by the jacks into place and also you could turn the wheels the can were resting on to manipulate these into posistion.

    3) Once the cans were together correctly (4mm fault tollerance) a root weld was put on the inside.

    4) The wheels the cans were resting were below a giant welding machine called a "sub-merged" arc welder. These would have 8mm wire and weld at 650-700amps. So the cans would sit on the wheels and turn and then once ready you start the sub arc, obvious the circle welds would be done first and on the outside.

    5) After a couple of sections were completed the weld would be tested by ultra sound equipment, issues would have to be air arced out or grinded out and redone by usually hand held mig.

    Some of the thicker cans had to be preheated before welding as the heat would dissipate too quickly. I think that there is more modern equipment available now to do this but this was back in 2005 when i welded my last turbine.
    I've built them too. The guy who lays out and cuts and bevels the shell plate and the guy who operates the plate rolls share the two hardest jobs because these arent regular cans. They're cones, albeit with a very gentle taper sometimes strapping only a 1/4" smaller on one end than the other. A 4mm tolerance for high/low seems pretty sloppy to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • scottbart
    replied
    How they weld wind turbines

    Funnily enough i used to weld them together, here is how it was done:

    1) Sheet steel would be placed into giant hydraulic rollers and rolled up to form a "can" that was tack welded along the lengh and then a root weld put in it once it was checked, that weld was with a Mig welder.

    2) Once we had 2 "cans" you would already have 1 can on a set of wheels that turn both ways and was controlled with a pendant. We would have the 2nd can on a "c" hook on an overhead crane, it would be lowered into place. The fitters would then use heavy duty hydraulic jacks and also weld grips onto the can in order to have something for the jacks to push against. Pretty much the can were pushed by the jacks into place and also you could turn the wheels the can were resting on to manipulate these into posistion.

    3) Once the cans were together correctly (4mm fault tollerance) a root weld was put on the inside.

    4) The wheels the cans were resting were below a giant welding machine called a "sub-merged" arc welder. These would have 8mm wire and weld at 650-700amps. So the cans would sit on the wheels and turn and then once ready you start the sub arc, obvious the circle welds would be done first and on the outside.

    5) After a couple of sections were completed the weld would be tested by ultra sound equipment, issues would have to be air arced out or grinded out and redone by usually hand held mig.

    Some of the thicker cans had to be preheated before welding as the heat would dissipate too quickly. I think that there is more modern equipment available now to do this but this was back in 2005 when i welded my last turbine.

    Leave a comment:


  • atc250r
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    Crazy......a thread with decent info and links that was started by a post that should have been deleted by the mods.
    I can hardly wrap my head around it enuff to read and take it seriously.
    Exactly. A new member (1st post) asks a stupid question and all kinds of answers are put forth. He is just a troll. His screen name alone was enough for me not to answer.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Crazy......a thread with decent info and links that was started by a post that should have been deleted by the mods.
    I can hardly wrap my head around it enuff to read and take it seriously.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim-TX
    replied
    Here is some info on the first wind farm in the Abilene, TX area. This farm was built 15 or more years ago. Since then, literally hundreds of towers have been built around here.

    http://www.trentmesa.com/techdetails.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • steel
    replied
    submerged arc would be my thoughts. Thats what we would use in our shop

    Leave a comment:


  • kcd616
    replied
    Originally posted by 1havnfun View Post
    Based on the question at hand. I would say this.
    Call 1.800.real.welder to find a qualified professional.
    There is one for a home about 2 miles from my house, it is about 20 feet tall and is 12" sch 80 pipe, is one 20 foot piece of pipe. There are 3 props 10 foot long.
    Looks like the base is plate welded with 7024 jet rod, same with the slip-on flange at the top.
    Hope this helps out and this has been 1.800.real.welder at your service.
    Sincerely,
    Kent
    Last edited by kcd616; 09-29-2010, 07:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • sky hy ironman
    replied
    Originally posted by hussainshayan View Post
    Do anybody know how to weld the sections of wind turbine tower? kindly tell me if anyone know?
    spin welding----seriously

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank33
    replied
    Originally posted by TerryL View Post
    The tower sections that get bolted together on the tube sections are very thick, depending on size of the tower and weight of nacelle the bolted sections can become very thick, much more than 3".

    Some found information:
    The tower of a typical American-made turbine is approximately 80 feet tall and weighs about 19,000 pounds.
    A typical nacelle for a current turbine weighs approximately 22,000 pounds.
    The sections they build up here are for turbines that are well over 200ft tall, with cells that weigh 120-140,000lbs.

    Leave a comment:


  • spotsineyes
    replied
    Originally posted by Victor Mansfield View Post
    Hopefully this works
    Nope.

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor Mansfield
    replied
    Hopefully this works

    http://engineeringtv.com/custom/vide...80&hei ght=390

    Leave a comment:


  • Ranch Hand
    replied
    Originally posted by cruizer View Post
    Nope, JB Weld is way better and cost effective.
    Why make it complicated with a two part adhesive. Liquid nails right out of the tube ought to do nicely.

    Leave a comment:


  • cruizer
    replied
    Originally posted by fabricator View Post
    I like to tig weld all of mine with a Harbor freight 130 amp welder and coat hangers for tig wire.
    Nope, JB Weld is way better and cost effective.

    Leave a comment:


  • fabricator
    replied
    Originally posted by hussainshayan View Post
    Do anybody know how to weld the sections of wind turbine tower? kindly tell me if anyone know?
    I like to tig weld all of mine with a Harbor freight 130 amp welder and coat hangers for tig wire.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim-TX
    replied
    Originally posted by TerryL View Post
    The tower sections that get bolted together on the tube sections are very thick, depending on size of the tower and weight of nacelle the bolted sections can become very thick, much more than 3".
    Right. I'm talking about the cylinder itself. I know the flanges where the bolts join the sections are even thicker. I've seen 5" thick and some are probably thicker. I wonder what our new member Hussain is really fishing for. Maybe he wants to know what it takes to bring one down. Hussain, what about it??????????? Tell us about yourself.
    Last edited by Jim-TX; 09-28-2010, 10:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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