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Cupped 3/8" plate for my welding table... best approach from here?

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  • #16
    What about a bubble in a top? Ive straightened lots of beams and plate, but I have a bubble in one of my roll-around tables. The top is 3/8 and became warped after a small forge was used on top of it. Its sort of like a large example of how to shrink sheet metal. This is not a fab table but I still dont like the bubble in it. Rosebud+ hammer is my first idea.

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    • #17
      Eric I would first try this technique. Take a welding tip, heat little circles, starting in the center of the bubble, get the circle to a dull red, then spray water on it with a squirt / spray bottle. Stand back and view the results. You should be able to judge how much heat to apply by the first attempt. Then start a group of circles, (see attachment). Very important to remember if you can feel heat with your naked hand the plate / material is still moving. Myself I wouldn't work at this very long until I cooled the whole plate dead cold with a water hose, and I mean dead cold, if you let the heat build up in the material you'll get different reaction each time you add heat.
      Attached Files
      Caution!
      These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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      • #18
        I'm totally new to all of this, so please bear with me.

        It seems that a lot of people are saying to apply heat to the convex (high, or "outside of the bowl") side of the plate to straighten it ... right?

        To me, that seems like the opposite of what you should do, because if you heat the convex side more than the concave side, the convex side is going to expand more than the convex side ... which will make the warpage worse rather than flattening it ... right?

        What am I missing here? Help a newbie understand the principle ... rather than just memorizing the recipe here, guys ...

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        • #19
          When heat is applied the material expands, when it cools the molecules in the material contract tighter than originally. Hence shrinkage!

          Or at least that is how it was explained to me back when Christ was a corporal.
          Caution!
          These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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          • #20
            Thanks, Sonora Iron.

            I dug around and asked some folks and they talked about something called "flame bending" which I guess is used in shipbuilding a lot.

            Anyone interested can read more about it here.

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            • #21
              Here is a good book on it. But he doesn't talk about straighting plate like I had hoped. He does know what he's talking about with other shapes!
              Attached Files
              Caution!
              These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

              Comment

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