Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another bell question...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Another bell question...

    Ok, I posted before regarding a cracked bell. I decided to clean out the crack, drill the end of the crack, and braze it. However, I have run into a problem.

    I can't drill it. I have brand new titanium coated drill bits, and they do absolutely nothing at all. I tried using some vinegar to help it cut, too. An old old time guy I used to know told me that once, and I have found it to work many times. But this stuff is hard! I started cleaning out the crack with a cut-off wheel and it is working, but it eats up my wheel noticably faster than usual. Also, it makes really tiny, dull, very dark red sparks.


    Any idea what the metal might be? Or the best way to try to drill it?
    "When life gets tough and it looks like the gators are going to get you, step back, take a deep breath, and start killing them one at a time, usually the closest one first."
    -- PAUL HOWE --

  • #2
    if you cant drill it with your bits use a carbide cutter instead
    Miller syncrowave 200 runner with coolmate 4
    and wp2025 weldcraft torch
    Miller 125c plasma cutter

    Comment


    • #3
      Carbide will cut it and so should regular high speed drill bits, however, sharpen your bit with not so much of a angle on the point and low speed on the drill and lots of feed pressure. With either bit you will get it, you can use oil as cutting oil to lube the bit and help keep it cool. When it stops drilling STOP and sharpen the bit. I have a special way I sharpen bits to cut harder steel and they will cut about anything with the right speed and feed. I wish i had a diagram of how I do it to share with you as it is not rocket science, it is just difficult to explain without showing you as I do it. Cutting oil generally has a high sulfur content ans stinks like crazy when using it. Just make sure you clean it up really well after the oil and drilling. I hope this helps you out.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the replies. I'll try some cutting oil. Maybe I'll get some different bits. I have no way of sharpening them myself.

        I was using a low speed and I was pushing as hard as I could without breaking the bit. It's kind of hard with small bits! I also tried a small carbide cutter with my dremel tool, and it did not so much either. Guess I'll keep trying. Maybe I need a better carbide cutter.
        "When life gets tough and it looks like the gators are going to get you, step back, take a deep breath, and start killing them one at a time, usually the closest one first."
        -- PAUL HOWE --

        Comment


        • #5
          It sounds like just junk cast iron to me. I wouldn't worry about drilling it. Here is my feelings on drilling a cast crack and i quit doing it 30 years ago. Picture a train engine on a turntable. Then the table turns to another track just like the crack does when you put some heat to it. It just turns directions and goes another way. So try a regular new grinding wheel with a sharp edge to grind faster than a cut off wheel. You want a wider gulley anyways. Just my thoughts...Bob
          Bob Wright

          Comment


          • #6
            NO CUTTING OIL on Cast Iron !!!!!!!

            Use a Cobalt Drill Bit & " No Oil " !!!!!!!!!!

            Never use Cutting Oil when drilling Cast of any sort !

            .......... Norm
            www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nfinch86 View Post
              Use a Cobalt Drill Bit & " No Oil " !!!!!!!!!!

              Never use Cutting Oil when drilling Cast of any sort !

              .......... Norm
              explain why, please.... you got me curious to understand now
              welder_one

              nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
              www.sicfabrications.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Cast = No Oil !!!!!!!!

                Originally posted by welder_one View Post
                explain why, please.... you got me curious to understand now
                Hi;

                Cast Iron is has a High sand content, Adding any kind of oil will just gum it up
                or clog it up if you will !!

                Drilling cast Dry allows the sand to escape freeing up your drill bit !
                Cobalt drill bits are the toughest and best all round drill bits I know of .

                ........... Norm
                www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by nfinch86 View Post
                  Hi;

                  Cast Iron is has a High sand content, Adding any kind of oil will just gum it up
                  or clog it up if you will !!

                  Drilling cast Dry allows the sand to escape freeing up your drill bit !
                  Cobalt drill bits are the toughest and best all round drill bits I know of .

                  ........... Norm
                  Not giving any disrespect, but I have drilled cast iron for hundreds of hours at work when I was a Tool and Die apprentice and coolant or cutting oil is a must, but we flooded it with either so it washed the chips away and the sand. I can tell you to never drill and tap a hole in cast iron and screw a bolt or lift ring into the new threads without putting a bunch of graese on them first as it will gall up and you will be drilling out the lift ring or bolt...(Did it once and got chewed on good and proper).

                  Cobalt are tougher drill bits, but are brittle and they have a wider web in the center so, most people and machines do not sharpen them correctly enough to make them work after they are chipped or dull. Here is the trick, know how to sharpen a drill bit, do not use a bit sharpener, truly have someone that knows the in's and out's of a drill bit show you how to hand sharpen a bit on a snag grinder. I had an old guy teach me about 27 years ago and the things that he taught me about drill bit sharpening served me well during my career. Trust me I have drilled and seen some nasty castings as they throw anything and the kitchen sink in those castings, I have seen taps, easy-outs, bolts, you name it thrown into castings when we were machining them. Carbide is the best thing to use, but if you are drilling such a small hole, I wouldn't mess with it as you are kind of defeating the purpose.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BaRtMaN View Post
                    Not giving any disrespect, but I have drilled cast iron for hundreds of hours at work when I was a Tool and Die apprentice and coolant or cutting oil is a must, but we flooded it with either so it washed the chips away and the sand. I can tell you to never drill and tap a hole in cast iron and screw a bolt or lift ring into the new threads without putting a bunch of graese on them first as it will gall up and you will be drilling out the lift ring or bolt...(Did it once and got chewed on good and proper).

                    Cobalt are tougher drill bits, but are brittle and they have a wider web in the center so, most people and machines do not sharpen them correctly enough to make them work after they are chipped or dull. Here is the trick, know how to sharpen a drill bit, do not use a bit sharpener, truly have someone that knows the in's and out's of a drill bit show you how to hand sharpen a bit on a snag grinder. I had an old guy teach me about 27 years ago and the things that he taught me about drill bit sharpening served me well during my career. Trust me I have drilled and seen some nasty castings as they throw anything and the kitchen sink in those castings, I have seen taps, easy-outs, bolts, you name it thrown into castings when we were machining them. Carbide is the best thing to use, but if you are drilling such a small hole, I wouldn't mess with it as you are kind of defeating the purpose.
                    No Disrespect taken; as I also have drilled and tapped many holes in cast.
                    Never have I or would I use any lubricant of any kind !

                    As far as hand sharpening drill bits I also was taught by an old tool maker in the early 70's on the best technique in sharpening small to very large drill bits.

                    My younger brother is also a 35 year Tool Maker , that has taught many tricks of the trade .

                    Too each his own, I guess !

                    ............ Norm
                    www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nice to meet a fellow tool maker on here Norm. That is how we were taught and expected to do it, however if it is right or wrong, who knows. I do know it worked very well most of the time. I remember drilling about 200 spring pockets in a cast iron die base about 18" deep and they all had to be flat bottomed the same depth......errrrrrr! You know my nightmare fore sure.

                      I worked in the stamping world for about 4 years and then times got hard in the early 90's and I moved to Injection mold making. I enjoyed the mold making more than the stamping dies.

                      So you know what I mean when I say to lay the tip down and remove the backing on a drill bit to keep it from loading up and dragging Glad you had someone teach you as you know the lesson was more than worth the money. It still amazes my dad (who owned his own service station and wrecker service for 30 years) that I could make a bit cut better than a new one. He has a friend that would bring him 5 gallon pails of dull and broken bits that they would throw away at their tool shop. I would take a little time and sharpen a handful every time I stopped in so he would have some common sized sharp bits.

                      If I can ever be of any help Norm, let me know, I am always willing to share

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Why don't one of you make a video for sharpening drill bits and post it on here for everyone, I'm sure there are many interested in knowing how.
                        "The only source of knowledge is experience." Albert Einstein

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BaRtMaN View Post
                          Nice to meet a fellow tool maker on here Norm. That is how we were taught and expected to do it, however if it is right or wrong, who knows. I do know it worked very well most of the time. I remember drilling about 200 spring pockets in a cast iron die base about 18" deep and they all had to be flat bottomed the same depth......errrrrrr! You know my nightmare fore sure.

                          I worked in the stamping world for about 4 years and then times got hard in the early 90's and I moved to Injection mold making. I enjoyed the mold making more than the stamping dies.

                          So you know what I mean when I say to lay the tip down and remove the backing on a drill bit to keep it from loading up and dragging Glad you had someone teach you as you know the lesson was more than worth the money. It still amazes my dad (who owned his own service station and wrecker service for 30 years) that I could make a bit cut better than a new one. He has a friend that would bring him 5 gallon pails of dull and broken bits that they would throw away at their tool shop. I would take a little time and sharpen a handful every time I stopped in so he would have some common sized sharp bits.

                          If I can ever be of any help Norm, let me know, I am always willing to share
                          Bart I'm NOT a Tool & Die Maker; My younger Brother is .
                          That doesn't mean I don't know how to sharpen many different styles & sizes of drill bits !

                          The gentleman that taught me was an old Second World War Vet.
                          He would stand by me over & over till I was almost as good as him.
                          I would Never say I was anywhere near as good as he was !!!!!

                          He was a very kind and gentle Big Man ( 6' 6" ) with a couple of missing finger tips ! I have very fond memories of our time together !

                          Have a good one; ......... Norm
                          www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X