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  • Question about brand of mig wire

    I bought my Miller 252 a while back and have not welded with it much. I'm still not
    quite use to having a voltage adjustment as opposed to taps. I was welding
    some 3/16" steel plate yesterday and was not happy with the results. I won't get into settings now but was wondering if anyone has used this wire and their comments of it.
    .035 National Std. Co.
    ASME SFA 5.18
    ER70S-6
    Standard-Arc (TM) 6.

    Problems...didn't wet out well...excessive splatter. The metal was rusted but I cleaned the rust off with 24 grit pad but it still had some small rust pits in the metal. I did no other cleaning.
    Nick
    Nick
    Miller 252 Mig
    Miller Cricket XL
    Millermatic 150 Mig
    Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
    2-O/A outfits
    Jet Lathe and Mill
    Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
    DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
    Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
    20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
    Propane Forge
    60" X 60" router/plasma table

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
    Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
    and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

  • #2
    Try that wire in the MM 150 and see how it works.
    Millermatic Passport Plus
    Millermatic 200

    Millermatic 350P with Python
    XMT 304 /w S-64 feeder and 12VS
    Dynasty 300 DX
    Thermal Arc 400 MST
    Victor O/A
    Premier Power Welder for my trail junk.

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    • #3
      you will typically have to run a slightly higher voltage on that wire to reduce your spatter. It may also be associated to the gas your running.

      Comment


      • #4
        My understanding is most of the wire is coming out of the same factory in Italy, with some out of Mexico and occasionally China.
        I just used a a half spool 11 pounder of one brand of that wire ER70S-6, most went well but in a couple of sections it seemed to do what you are saying splatter, splatter everywhere. When that went empty.
        I had another half 11 pounder, That was slightly rusted. Spooled off about 3 pounds to get to good clean bright wire. Again it did the same thing in one or two spots.
        I was thinking that it was my shoddy skills at doing vertical and out of position welding. Being a hobbyist, occasional welder. but it might have something to do with the way the wire is made or put on the spool?
        I bought another spool 11 pounder at HF to have some on hand. It to was made in Italy, now that 3 spools of wire that span about ten years in length and two of them acted the same, the only other thing is if you moved the ground clamp as I did one time and only hit it with a lick and a pray. it did sort the same thing sputter an splatter. All were ER70S-6 with the 75/25 on my old Linc 100

        glen, If your not on the edge, your wasting space

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't know where the wire was made but the label was printed in the USA.
          I'm using 75/25. I tried some other metal, not rusted, and things went better.
          I found I was looking at the wrong chart for settings on the first piece. I'm still not real happy with the weld.......it seems to hump more than I would like for the thickness but that's probably me. It's a 45lb spool that came with the welder and I'm not going to trash it. It is coated wire btw. Like I said before I'm not use to having adjustable voltage and need to learn how much voltage
          change affects the weld.
          Nick
          Nick
          Miller 252 Mig
          Miller Cricket XL
          Millermatic 150 Mig
          Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
          2-O/A outfits
          Jet Lathe and Mill
          Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
          DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
          Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
          20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
          Propane Forge
          60" X 60" router/plasma table

          www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
          Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
          and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

          Comment


          • #6
            hey sorry your having trouble I use 0.35 wire at work all the time and I find it does tend to do that at times, but for me sounds like you were needing some more heat to smooth out the weld so its not so humpy.

            Comment


            • #7
              252 Woes.

              Originally posted by monte55 View Post
              I don't know where the wire was made but the label was printed in the USA. I'm not use to having adjustable voltage and need to learn how much voltage
              change affects the weld.
              Nick
              Nick: Voltage controls height and width of the weld bead, Wire Speed (Amperage) controls weld penetration (wire speed = burn-off rate).

              Though all electrodes have to meet AWS Specifications, like everything else, some are better than others. I particularly favor Lincoln Super-Arc L-56 solid MIG wire. Hobart wire and electrodes are also, very good.

              Basically, we get what we pay for. I've tried some "off brand" wires (e.g. Weldcote) and there is a difference the way it feeds and welds.

              www.weldingsupply.com has a huge inventory of Lincoln consumables.

              www.cyberweld.com has Hobart rods and wire

              www.ramweldingsupply.com sells Lincoln wire, as well

              Nick, have you got an .045 liner in your MIG gun? That's got charts for .045 wire, doesn't it?

              Dave
              "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

              Comment


              • #8
                I rarely have a problem from any brand of solid mig wire. Fluxcore is a different story. Provided the wire is not rusty and the machine is properly set up to feed the wire, most likely the wire is fine and the problem is volt/wire speed settings and/or welding technique and/or base metal preperation.

                If the bead is too tall/narrow and/or has cold toes, overfill or overlapped toes, there are a few remedies.

                -Decrease the wire speed and/or increase the voltage.
                -Decrease the stickout length, which increases the voltage.
                -Increase the torch angle from vertical (lay it down more), which flattens the bead.
                -Push rather than drag the torch. Pushing widens and flattens the bead while decreasing the penetration.
                -Increase the travel speed. Traveling too slow overfills the weld and overlaps the toes.
                -Decrease the travel speed. Traveling too fast doesn't allow the bead to fuse, penetrate and wet in.
                Millermatic350P/Python, MillermaticReach/Q300
                Millermatic175
                MillermaticPassport/Q300
                HTP MIG200
                PowCon 300SM, MK Cobramatic
                ThermalArc 185ACDC, Dynaflux Tig'r, CK-20
                DialarcHF, Radiator-1
                Hypertherm PowerMax 380
                Purox oxy/ace
                Jackson EQC
                -F350 CrewCab 4x4
                -LoadNGo utility bed
                -Bobcat 250NT
                -PassportPlus/Q300
                -XMT304/Optima/Spoolmatic15A
                -Suitcase8RC/Q400
                -Suitcase12RC/Q300
                -Smith oxy/propane
                -Jackson EQC

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                • #9
                  Thanks all for the replies
                  Nick
                  Nick
                  Miller 252 Mig
                  Miller Cricket XL
                  Millermatic 150 Mig
                  Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
                  2-O/A outfits
                  Jet Lathe and Mill
                  Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
                  DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
                  Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
                  20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
                  Propane Forge
                  60" X 60" router/plasma table

                  www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
                  Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
                  and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    hi monte, try this, set your 252 as per chart, and turn the volts knob as you weld and tune the unit in by the sound of the arc, you want that really consistent fast buzzing sound. you will know it when you hit that sweet spot.
                    Anything you could do, I could do better.
                    I can do anything better than you!
                    Lockheed Martin
                    Armco Steel, Baltimore
                    USW local #3185

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                    • #11
                      Same thing to me. I did not know much on my new 252, require some adjustable setting-volts and feed speed things. I try on my best to learn.
                      I try follow-up this post.
                      MillerMatic 211

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                      • #12
                        National-Standard wire is drawn in either Niles Michigan or Stillwater Oklahoma.

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