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Just scored a new mill!

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  • Alaskan
    replied
    I just picked up an entire shop of machines, several were new and unused.

    In the mix was a new Grizzly Mill (Bridgeport copy) and a new Grizzly 13x40 lathe

    Both have DRO's...they say Grizzly or them, one 2-axis & one 3-axis, I suspect someone else makes them for Grizzly....they work very well and the quality is amazing

    Anyone know anything about them...

    http://grizzly.com/products/searchresults.aspx?q=DRO

    Leave a comment:


  • kcstott
    replied
    Newall DRO's are just about the best and it shows at $1400 each.

    DRO Pro's on ebay for about $800 is as good as you can ask for in a non name brand unit.

    Then there's anilam and acu rite each about $1200.

    Used units in good working order are hard to find.

    I have an old 3 axis display Acu Rite that will take the DRO PRO's glass scales. You would have to figure out the plug interface. $200 plus shipping for the display I have all the manuals and paper work for it to. But I'd be willing to bet that for the cost of three scales and my Display you be right at the cost of a new unit.

    Leave a comment:


  • nocheepgas
    replied
    Originally posted by Checkered Flag View Post
    Everything went very smooth, forked it on, and slid it off. $90 bux and 45 minutes from meetup the mill was put in place.

    Was very happy with the move. Spent some time cleaning it up, here she is..

    Tooling is on the way, but still on the fence with a DRO choice, any oppinions?

    http://www.dropros.com/?gclid=CPSNuY...FRA2gwodey69Dg

    Leave a comment:


  • Checkered Flag
    replied
    Everything went very smooth, forked it on, and slid it off. $90 bux and 45 minutes from meetup the mill was put in place.

    Was very happy with the move. Spent some time cleaning it up, here she is..

    Tooling is on the way, but still on the fence with a DRO choice, any oppinions?
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Alaskan
    replied
    They can be pretty easily moved around by-hand with a couple guys rolling on small diameter pipe or 1-inch round bar stock if you have a decent concrete surface.

    Takes about 4 rods total, as one rolls out from under the machine just pick it up and place it back in on the backside...

    Make the pieces long enough to have them sticking out about 6" per-side and with that you can bang the rods with a hammer to actually steer the machine left/right toward the new location.

    Once you have arrived at the location in your shop where the machine will be simply use a bar with a flat-tip to remove the rods
    Last edited by Alaskan; 04-25-2010, 01:34 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • GT6Steve
    replied
    When I got my 1966 Bridgeport I was told they were a dime a dozen in LA because everyone was upgrading to CNC leaving the manual machines to rust. I paid $1000 and it had a freshly rebuilt J head and a digital X-Y readout. I LOVE that thing!

    It's amazing how often you'll use the mill now that you've got it.

    Leave a comment:


  • kcstott
    replied
    The above two companies and when is comes down to it Enco, MSC and Rutland tool. Fortunately I have an independent tool dealer close and the can get me anything I want at very good prices. I had no idea they had a web site. Talk to John or Larry
    http://industrialtoolsupply.com
    Last edited by kcstott; 04-24-2010, 09:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    I have had good luck purchasing end mills and other tooling from Shars:

    http://www.shars.com/

    I bought my Kurt 6" vise, my Interapid indicator and some other stuff from the craigs list. The fellow that I purchased my vise from had purchased 5 truck loads of machine tooling equipment. He had 10 kurt vises. He reground the vise and replaced the bearings so it was like new.

    Good Luck with your new Mill.

    Don

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by Checkered Flag View Post

    Who do you guys buy mills/bits etc, from?
    Ebay and http://www.jtsmachine.com/ ...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Checkered Flag
    replied
    Have it's spot in the shop all cleaned out and ready.

    Right off the bat I can't go wild on tooling, and the machine is for pretty specific repeated tasks. Will have to get just what's needed for now.

    Who do you guys buy mills/bits etc, from?

    I'll pick up a quality keyless chuck, some 1" and 1/2" endmills, some larger drill bits, center points, the basics for now.

    Leave a comment:


  • kcstott
    replied
    The other thing is. Bridgeport's are Cheep to rebuild.

    $250 for a spindle rebuild kit with top end belt and bearings
    $2500 to have the table surface ground and the ways re-scraped

    So you could buy a total clunker for a grand and invest another $3000 and have a brand new machine for 1/4 the cost of new. and it's a Bridgeport so it will hold it's value over time.

    My machine as it sets is worth $3000 w/ no tooling. Throw in the vise, collets, and rotary table and now you're up to $4000 on the high end.

    Leave a comment:


  • kcstott
    replied
    There is a procedure to moving a Bridgeport.

    It is as follows right out of the manual.
    Paraphrased

    Tighten column swivel bolts.
    Loosen ram locking bolts and advance ram so that 1" of dove tail is exposed on the REAR of the ram. Tighten bolts to lock ram in this position.
    Lower Knee to about 1/3 off the bottom.
    Move table to rear of saddle. (Y Axis)
    Center table on saddle (X Axis)
    Lock knee, saddle, & table.

    Now for my twist. The head dosen't need to be rotated if you have a large enough lift to get over the top of it and if you have the vertical clearance.
    If not you will have to rotate the head to get the lift closer to the ram.

    If you use a sling use padding on the dove tail right behind the head. as this is the best place to lift and it will cut through a strap if not protected. I used pieces of card board. But what ever you use be sure it's at least 1/4" thick

    As for lifting you can do it a few ways. One is use a fork lift and just put a 6X6 post across the forks and lift on the dovetail right be hind the head.
    That the mill balance point and you can drive away with the lift and the machine will stay put so long as you take it easy.

    The other way is to use a Cherry picker Which is what I have done three separate times. You can use a Nylon lifting sling in a basket around the dove tail behind the head. A six foot loop sling work best just double it up and the two loops will be right on top of the ram with about 2-3" extra to get a hook through. Be sure your leg on the Cherry pick are out beyond the end of the boom or the Cherry pick will tilt.

    You can also use a lifting eye installed in the ram thread size is 5/8 -11

    The mill weighs 2000 pounds and is a little top heavy it doesn't take much for one to be laying on it's side.

    And be sure your cherry pickers legs have more then 24" between them as this is the narrow width of the base of the mill.

    Those cheep harbor freight Cherry pickers will work but You need to have the boom way out to be able to set it down as there are bolts in between the legs of the picker and the leg are right at 24" apart. Been there done that.

    Good luck
    If you need help Call me I can advise over the phone
    Number is on the site

    Wish I was closer I'd come over and help ya

    Leave a comment:


  • seattle smitty
    replied
    Way to go, CF; you'll wonder how you ever lived without it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Checkered Flag
    replied
    I looked for a good long time at other options, the BP is a bit large for where it's going. Found that all the lighter machines were just that, lighter duty.

    Finally came to the conclusion that if I wanted to be happy with a mill than it would have to be a BP..

    Now moving it is the next issue. It's 5 miles from the new location. Was going to hire a flatbed to winch it up and bring it over.

    Of course invert the head and lower the table all the way down.

    Any suggestions?

    Leave a comment:


  • kcstott
    replied
    Originally posted by Alaskan View Post
    Currently they can't keep up with the demand, even at about 16k now for a base machine
    That's what I've heard talking to the Harig rep at Westec

    And in some areas used machines are going at a premium.
    I stole mine for a cool $1100 with a vise and 10" rotary table.
    Sad thing is. 20 years ago back in trade school we had a few Bridgeport's and I didn't car for them, I liked the Gortons. But I soon learned as it turns out Bridgeport is the standard by which all others are measured.
    Last edited by kcstott; 04-23-2010, 11:21 PM.

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