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  • #16
    Originally posted by bretsk2500 View Post
    your legs are no more protected in regular jeans than they are with shorts.
    Maybe not if you're talking exclusively about fractures, but if you're talking about abrasions and lacerations, they most certainly are more protected. I do have a bit of hands on experience in this. Back when I was an EMT, you knew it was spring when you got the first call: motor vehicle accident with injuries - one vehicle - motorcycle versus (fill in the blank).

    Just for S&G's, I'll tell you about the most gruesome one.

    I don't even remember what kind of bike it was because it was mangled up and sitting in a ditch about 200 feet from the former rider. He apparently lost control in a curve, contacted something coming out of it (don't know if it was another vehicle or the guardrail itself) and got bucked off and landed chest down on the guardrail traveling in the direction of guardrail.

    Now picture the guardrail and how its attached to galvanized H beams with the tops of the H beams projecting slightly.

    He rode the guardrail for about 60 feet and every one of those H beams took about a 1" deep chunk out of him. He stopped on a post that caught his belt and waist of his jeans. I'll never forget the sight of his intestines dangling over the guardrail or the yellowish/orange tint of the rusty colored drying blood on the guardrail, or the smell of his intestinal contents in the hot sun.

    The picture is easy to relate... doesn't even take a thousand words. What I can't explain is the feeling of looking into his helmet and seeing it empty, even though there is a physically intact face inside... but hollow, like a statue of grievous loss frozen in time. I could type a million words on that one and you still wouldn't know the half of it.

    Anyway, yeah, leathers are better than denim and denim is WAY better than bare skin, and that's coming from the guy that had to wrap the road rash if only to last for 10 minutes before the ER staff could promptly cut off my beautiful work!

    80% of failures are from 20% of causes
    Never compromise your principles today in the name of furthering them in the future.
    "All I ever wanted was an honest week's pay for an honest day's work." -Sgt. Bilko
    "We are generally better persuaded by reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others." -Pascal
    "Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything." -Pascal

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dman2010 View Post
      i have a 2002 kawasaki ninja zx6r with two thin cracks in the frame and was gona have a welder here in my town tig weld it for me who has been welding for at least thirty years and i am told he is the best around i was just hoping to get some reassurance that a aluminum frame welded by a profesional is repairable and would hold strong and be ok thanks guys
      Dman, I hope you aren't taking this the wrong way. EVERYONE here is out for YOUR safety!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We appreciate your intrest in repairing the bike, but like hmmm...I don't think your experienced weldor will sign anything, expecially putting up $1 Mill in insurance to cover his welds. I had a bad fall on my Kawasaki back in the day, after 2 hours of riding with slippers (flip-flops to all you haoles), swim shorts and sun glasses, it got cold as we neared the mountain (Denver), so I pulled over and put on my boots, jeans and helmet. Needles to say, I wasn't going fast, about 35-40mph, came around a corner and dodged a car coming onto my lane. Lost control of the bike avoiding the car and wiped out. Helmet was cracked, lost a tooth and a small scar on my upper lip. Minor to Boddybagger's stories, but like I said, we are just looking out for you...
      Ok, maybe I'm just portuguese, and had to add in my .02

      bert
      p.s. If you buy a NEW bike from a dealer and you wipe out from a cracked frame, you can sue the bike company for BIG bucks. Wipe out from a welded frame that wasn't done properly (weld maybe warped the frame or ANY reason), you will have hospital bills and a quality of life that you will be sorry for with no way to make an income the rest of your life......
      I digress..........
      I'm not late...
      I'm just on Hawaiian Time

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      • #18
        This is an interesting thread. Mainly from the standpoint that a guy came on a welding forum to ask about small (?) cracks on a motorcycle frame.
        By not posting any photographs he got answers stemming from the worst case scenerios imaginable. Poor *******
        I also find it interesting that all the "scary" responses came from people who ride
        One could almost gather that these people on this forum would not repair the frame, leaving the bike unridable.
        This said and from "the welder guys" perspective I would have to sit down and talk with the bike owner and get a feel for what was going on. I would with his help, try to detemine what caused the crack and how we could re-enforce the area.
        I would also explain to him that all heat treat and temper would be lost in the HAZ and that there could be some risk involved. More beef could be the only way to go.
        I would also tell him no matter how much insurance I had it would be a long drawn out process with no actual winners if the worst was to happen.
        More than likely I would weld it if I felt ok with the person. In fact chances are I would win him over enuff that he would send me work and he would always mention that the weld job was still doing fine. (meaning I had him keeping a watchful eye on it as well)
        It would also be cash only with no tickets just like a fuel tank repair. I know that doesn't stop everything but it can make it somewhat harder to prove. Chances are I may have a few before and after pics if the job was unique enuff to warrant it IMO.
        One other trick I have up my sleeve is sometimes I will make a repair vitually undetectable by super careful prep and mimicking the factory welds followed by finishing the surface area all around the repair afterwards.
        It would all depend on the crack.
        Many here have sorta made a blanket statement that they wouldn't fix it. I am sorta making a blanket statement that I WOULD.
        Now all that being said I wanna point out that I myself have numerous motorcycle injuries and put up with pain these days I didn't see (or care about) coming in later years. I would be much more interested in finding a welder that rode motorcycles as well and could lay down the dimes.
        But I do wanna stress my point......
        This freekin' thread is useless without pics!!!!!

        P.S. How am I doing for re-stirring the pot???

        www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
        Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
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        • #19
          ninja

          once i figure out how to get my pics posted an have time to do it ill get some on here the cracks really arent that bad and the one is right along the factory weld

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          • #20
            Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
            P.S. How am I doing for re-stirring the pot???
            ahh........actually PRETTY GOOD my friend
            I'm not late...
            I'm just on Hawaiian Time

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            • #21
              Originally posted by bretsk2500 View Post
              your legs are no more protected in regular jeans than they are with shorts.

              I've got off my flat tracker at over 120 wearing jeans, and I have to really disagree with that.
              I'm glad I wasn't sportin short pants.

              JTMcC
              Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                P.S. How am I doing for re-stirring the pot???
                You powering that blender with the 700???

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by kbraby View Post
                  You powering that blender with the 700???
                  Who wouldn't?

                  www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                  Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                  MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                  Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                  Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                  Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                  Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                  Miller WC-115-A
                  Miller Spectrum 300
                  Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                  Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    OK back to actually answering the question.

                    Frame is aluminum. We obviously know it's a weldable grade but no way to know for sure which one. One of the most popular grades, 6061-T6 is often welded but the as welded properties really are quite poor. Weak and brittle in the heat affected zone, HAZ. Further post weld heat treatment is required to get strength and elongation properties of the metal back to where it needs to be. If welded and not properly heat treated, it will crack once again, typically right next to the weld in the HAZ.

                    It is possible but unlikely the frame was made out of a 7000 series aluminum. Some of these grades have as welded properties that no not require heat treatment.

                    Unless you know for sure what grades of aluminum you are welding, and follow up with proper post weld heat treatment if necessary, you are only tempting fate with any type of repair procedure.

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                    • #25
                      new post and pictures in motorsports thanks guys

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