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  • New Engine Driven Welder

    I'm getting ready to buy a new engine driven welder, and i was wonder what everyone's opiniton on what brand, type to buy. I would like to have one that was in diesel, and that would weld ac/dc and cc/cv run a suitcase mig welding and power a dystny 200 welding

  • #2
    Air Vantage 500 or the Big Blue Air Pak!


    On edit: I think all of Lincoln’s big engine drives are DC only!

    So buy the Miller if you want AC welding capabilities.
    Last edited by Sonora Iron; 03-24-2010, 07:03 PM.
    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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    • #3
      How much are you going to run this thing? You have to go good long time for diesel to pencil out.

      Comment


      • #4
        it going to be mounted on a truck and used to power tool when working on tractors and on fence and as a backup genrator for my house so it will run for about several hours

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        • #5
          Did you look at the prices of Diesel Machines...

          Lets see for what you are using it for...11-12 grand diesel gen set...or 4 grand gas...Sure you want the diesel...ok, ok...trailblazer diesel is 7-8k..WHY??
          Kevin
          Lincoln ranger 305g x2
          Ln25
          Miller spectrum 625
          Miller 30a spoolgun
          Wc115a
          Lincoln 210mp
          F550 imt service truck

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tryagn5 View Post
            Lets see for what you are using it for...11-12 grand diesel gen set...or 4 grand gas...Sure you want the diesel...ok, ok...trailblazer diesel is 7-8k..WHY??
            Kevin
            He is out on the farm/ranch. Tractors are diesel. He can use tax free dyed diesel in the machine. Plus he most likely keeps more than a few gallons of diesel on hand in his bulk tanks.

            Diesel Fuel will be available at all times. At least easier to keep on hand than gasoline can be kept on hand at all times since lawnmowers, cars, gokarts, dirtbikes, chainsaws and various other small engines used on the farm/ranch generally run on gasoline.

            Plus the diesel will probadly be more likely to start and run when he needs it than the gasoline units will. I have seen a lot of problems with gasoline units in the past. Carb problems, ignition problems and stale fuel problems.
            Last edited by Harvuskong; 03-24-2010, 11:01 PM.

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            • #7
              The thing about having fuel on hand is likely a factor, but but it takes a long time to put a hundred hours on a machine with repair and maintenance work. Even power outages take a lot of time to add up. 40 hrs a week of run time would be another matter vs 4.

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              • #8
                I have 500 hrs on the unit on my service truck in 15 yrs, 200 or more was in one pull where I put it on a well for a couple weeks in a remote location. If I had use to need 120 for service work it wouldn't be too long before I added a battery and inverter to the truck to serve where it would work, as fuel prices climb it would pay for itself not to mention putting hrs on my welder to zing a grinder or drill.
                As a side note, the suitcase mig is a commendable idea but in reality unless one has a special need it becomes a big riding dust collector. I can see tossing a dynasty in if the need arose but for field work if I can help it stick is the go to solution. If he has special needs, cutting edges of lots of buckets, lots of wear repair, days on end of welding then other things make sense as well as larger machines that gouge, etc. But fixing some fences, working on some tractors couldn't re-coupe the investment in a lifetime.
                Last edited by Sberry; 03-25-2010, 07:32 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Joben View Post
                  I'm getting ready to buy a new engine driven welder, and i was wonder what everyone's opiniton on what brand, type to buy. I would like to have one that was in diesel, and that would weld ac/dc and cc/cv run a suitcase mig welding and power a dystny 200 welding
                  How much MONEY are you planning on spending? Are you going to need 3-phase power for pivot irrigation systems?

                  You could be looking at a $30K investment with all you are asking, or minimize things down to less than $10K.

                  I concur with SBerry, instead of a Suitcase wire feeder, may want to look at the Passport Plus, instead.

                  Sonora's right, the only Lincoln with AC weld output are the small Rangers, and they are gas-only models. (Ranger 10,000+, 225, 250 GXT, and Ranger 3-Phase)

                  If 3-Phase irrigation power isn't needed, a Trailblazer 302 with Kohler's new EFI ECH 730 V-Twin is a lot less expensive than the TB with a Kubota Diesel.
                  (By about $4,000) Those savings could buy a Passport Plus (with a spool gun), and pay for more than half of a Dynasty.

                  If you have a need for compressed air, then the TB Air-Pack would be a wise purchase. Then you could CAC-A, run a plasma, air tools, fill flat tires, and blow the dirt of your work clothes. If you insist on a diesel, then you'll have to opt for the Big Blue Air-Pack, deluxe model (with AC) is $23,805.

                  Just ought depends on how much you can afford/want to spend.
                  Last edited by davedarragh; 03-25-2010, 10:35 AM.
                  "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                    blow the dirt of your work clothes.
                    Been awhile since you worked for Kiewit hasn’t it!
                    Caution!
                    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
                      Been awhile since you worked for Kiewit hasn’t it!
                      Yeah, what was I thinking?

                      I had to use a hammer & chisel
                      Last edited by davedarragh; 03-25-2010, 09:26 AM.
                      "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                        Yeah, what was I thinking?
                        When you worked for Kiewit, were you a supervisor? If so did you ever have to do any JHA’s?

                        Kiewit will take you to a whole nother level of safety!
                        Caution!
                        These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Pks

                          Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
                          When you worked for Kiewit, were you a supervisor? If so did you ever have to do any JHA’s?

                          Kiewit will take you to a whole nother level of safety!
                          I was asked a couple of times, if I was interested in Supervision, but declined. The JHA's were done by the Safety Dep't., and YES, they do take you to another level of Safety.

                          They were good to work for, but when they "spun off" their Materials/Mining Group (sand/rock/Redi-Mix/Asphalt, etc) we wound up in Rinker's hands, and ultimately CEMEX.

                          I saw the hand writing on the wall, as Kiewit's last BIG project was the Cardinal's Stadium, and as it was winding down, most domestic cement was being shipped to China, for the Yantzee River Dam.

                          We did manage to pour around 130,000 cu/yds of CIP concrete though. The Super Column footers took over 1500 yds ea of 5000# and the columns were poured with 7000# 1/2" rock with Rheobuild 1000 admix. Some slippery mud!

                          Oh well, life marches on.
                          Last edited by davedarragh; 03-25-2010, 12:03 PM.
                          "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                          • #14
                            What I hated about doing JHA’s was coming up with every possible situation an employee could get hurt in the upcoming task. Once the project manager or district sponsor read them, if he / she could think of more we heard about it!
                            Caution!
                            These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yeah, I hear you. Look into your crystal ball and rehearse EVERY possible scenario.

                              Then, there's always the "unexpected." Like when a concrete boom pump looses a hose clamp, and goes flying.

                              As long as you've got your vest on, you'll be okay.
                              "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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