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Fastener/Nut welding

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  • jimmy_pop
    replied
    ive done this with MIG and i needed to chase the nut after it cooled because the heat caused enough warping to not allow the bolt to thread in properly. Ive even had bolts seize in an un-chased nut.

    I cant tell if you have your nut centered over a hole to allow a tap to thread through.

    You might strike arc about 1/2 away from the nut then drag the arc across the edge of the M6 nut and do this on 3-4 sides.

    Leave a comment:


  • popspipes
    replied
    Tig would be my choice as its easier to direct the heat where its needed, a bit of practice and you should do OK.

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  • gani_amg
    replied
    Thank you guys for your opinions

    Leave a comment:


  • Bodybagger
    replied
    Coat a screw liberally with graphite powder and thread it into the nut before you weld it. It will act like welding a solid piece of metal.

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  • DOCDENT
    replied
    there are nuts designed to weld onto products.............theyre called weld nuts ...i use tons of them

    Leave a comment:


  • captkipp
    replied
    used MIG and TIg for this task in the past. Either one would be more a appropriate process, IMHO. 309 wire.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by AV8OR View Post
    First I would invest in a new camera or clean the lens.

    Second have you looked at a rivet nut? They can also be known as a blind nut or nut-sert.
    I was going to suggest this, too, but I had a feeling it would require too much finesse on their end, which it doesn't seem like there is an abundance of, based on the pics, post, and description of the problem. I figure they just need a fastener with some more meat to take the heat.

    We use a lot of riv-nuts for certain applications, generally with aluminum and composites. Usually 10-32.

    AV8tor, where are you based besides in the air somewhere?

    Leave a comment:


  • AV8OR
    replied
    First I would invest in a new camera or clean the lens.

    Second have you looked at a rivet nut? They can also be known as a blind nut or nut-sert.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Hello and welcome to the forum.

    I read your other post and others here had wondered why you aren't using a GMAW set-up for some if your production. Admittedly, I don't have much experience with heavy steel fabrication, but it would seem to me that GMAW could help you with this particular weld, too.

    If you are confined to SMAW, can you use a fastener with a wider/heavier flange?

    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • gani_amg
    replied
    Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
    SMAW seems a bit raw-dog for the application, don't you think? Why don't you "melt" it up with some of that 71 series flux core you're stocking?

    May I ask where your shop is located and what you're making out there?
    we are steel structure fabrication company in kuwait

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    SMAW seems a bit raw-dog for the application, don't you think? Why don't you "melt" it up with some of that 71 series flux core you're stocking?

    May I ask where your shop is located and what you're making out there?

    Leave a comment:


  • gani_amg
    started a topic Fastener/Nut welding

    Fastener/Nut welding

    Hai,

    we are welding a M6 mild steel nut with 5mm stainless steel sheet by SMAW process by using 309 electrode. the problem is the nut is getting melted due to the high current. The average set current is 100Amps & if we keep less than 100 doesn't melt the job.

    I'm thinking of projection welding for this type of job. But, i'm not sure whether this will work out.

    put your suggestions.
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