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  • Stainless Sheet Welding.

    I have 2 pieces of 1/8" x 6" x 18" Stainless. I need to weld them up to be 1/8" x 12" x 18".

    Which is the best approach into welding them, so there is no heat distortion and my end result is a nice, non warped piece of metal.?

    I have a Sync.200, so I can TIG/Stick weld it. I also have a MM211, and stainless wire. But I'll have to weld it with C-25,

    I don't want to end up with a distorted piece of Stainless, cause I do not want to waste it, So I do want to hear some of your ideas.

  • #2
    Originally posted by myistar View Post
    Which is the best approach into welding them, so there is no heat distortion
    Then don’t let me do it!
    I’d like to learn this trick too.
    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Sonora Iron View Post
      Then don’t let me do it!
      I’d like to learn this trick too.
      Sonora, what do you think? Some 308 rods (3/32) about 50 amps with a good heat sink backing bar?

      Assuming it's 304 stainless
      "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
        Sonora, what do you think? Some 308 rods (3/32) about 50 amps with a good heat sink backing bar?

        Assuming it's 304 stainless
        Boy you got me! I wish I had paid more attention to those sheetmetal guys doing stainless steel sinks, and counter tops! Artist!
        Caution!
        These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

        Comment


        • #5
          it is 304 stainless. I think. Not really sure, I got it for free. hahaa.

          I got 308L (3/32") stick rods.

          Only heatsink thing that I got might be 1/2" x 2" aluminum flat.

          what do you think. weld 1 side fully, then flip it then do the other side?

          Clamp the sheet to my welding table?

          Or just, go out and get a real sheet of stainless the size i need.? hahaa.. If I can weld some "scraps" together I'd rather do that. This is going to be a base to a full stainless wheely deally oxy/acetylene cart.

          Comment


          • #6
            I use to do a lot of stainless steel welding years ago, but it was mostly structural in food processing plants. I know just enough about stainless steel sheetmetal welding to know my limitation.

            Hold on someone here with stainless steel / sheetmetal experience will be along and teach us both something.
            Caution!
            These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

            Comment


            • #7
              You know, years ago I was close with a sheetmetal guy, could do amazing things.

              Tack tack tack, flip it, tack tack tack. Then weld an inch at a time, immediately douse it with a wet rag. So on and so forth. Then wipe over the weld with a sharp sanding disk, immediately douse it again, with a wet rag. Over and over again. Replacing discs as often as necessary.

              You could pour water, into one of his SS countertops, it would all run into the sink, no puddling.

              That all being said, considering the time and cost of doing this particular job(the op), he would toss the 6" wide pieces into the scrap pile, to be used later, and shear out a piece 12" x 18". Customer would be money ahead. Even if for your own purposes, "make-work" isn't really saving money.
              Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

              Comment


              • #8
                Stainless sheet will warp badly, Unless you need the practice or cost is an issue I would have one sheared the right size.
                Stainless has an expansion rate approximately 1.5 times that of carbon steel.

                Good luck with your project...
                mike sr

                Comment


                • #9
                  christ, it's 1/8th stainless and its going to have a couple of gas bottles sitting on it. get a grip, are you really asking how to do it or did you just want to let everyone know what kind of equipment you have. why would anyone even ask!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    ok, sorry, a little over the top. it is .125 ss, you have a tig setup, it is for a bottle cart. go corner to corner, weld outside, run tight fillet on inside. this is not light guage sheet metal. just do it.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fdcmiami View Post
                      christ, it's 1/8th stainless and its going to have a couple of gas bottles sitting on it. get a grip, are you really asking how to do it or did you just want to let everyone know what kind of equipment you have. why would anyone even ask!
                      Well enlighten us Obi-Wan Kenobi

                      Originally posted by fdcmiami View Post
                      this is not light guage sheet metal.
                      But if it were sheetmetal how would you do it?
                      Caution!
                      These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        haha ok, ok i am a little punchy today but i am not exactly sure what you are asking. it is 11 ga. ss. that is plenty thick to weld it however you want and what we have is two small pieces that are going to hold some bottles (six inches seems a little short but hey that's just me); if i had my way i would bend it, if i didn't i would use any of the three methods the poster mentioned. 3/32 rod sounds great to me too. mig weld; you betcha.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by fdcmiami View Post
                          haha ok, ok i am a little punchy today but i am not exactly sure what you are asking. it is 11 ga. ss. that is plenty thick to weld it however you want and what we have is two small pieces that are going to hold some bottles (six inches seems a little short but hey that's just me); if i had my way i would bend it, if i didn't i would use any of the three methods the poster mentioned. 3/32 rod sounds great to me too. mig weld; you betcha.
                          Ah we all have bad days!

                          Seems as I remember you having a sheetmetal background.
                          What if it was a 26GA stainless steel countertop?
                          Caution!
                          These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            i will have to say that i have never welder 26 ga ss (.018), i imagine if i had to and my shakey hands could manage it i would simply fuse weld it. i have built baghouses and dust collection systems out of stainless, worked in an orange juice plant, several food handlers in orange/LA county area, also did several california pizza kitchens. the lightest i've worked with is 22 and that we would usually pittsburgh or snaplock. i've worked with enough 20, 18, 16 to make welding 1/8 th seem like plate. still like most of the older guys here it was something that came and went and could come again who knows.

                            to me a 26 ga counter top would only mean problems, you could drop a spoon on that and dent it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Clamp it to your workbench using angle iron set back about 1" from the joint line. Clamp both pieces the same way.

                              Tack the one side every 3" or so. Take the clamps off, and grind the tack welds flat with the sheet.

                              Flip the sheet and repeat process.

                              Flip back and skip weld the pieces together.

                              Grind bead flat, flip, repeat.

                              I'd tig it using a high pulse rate (200PPS+) using 1/16" filler. Use the minimum average amps necessary. With the Sync 200 you're limited to 10PPS, so I'd try that setting the amps at about 90-100A. Peak at 50%. Background at 30%. I haven't tried these pulse settings myself so you may want to play with some other scrap before going to the real thing.

                              As mentioned, having a piece of 1/8" sheared makes a lot more sense, but if you're trying to learn something new, the pulse may help you out.
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