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  • #31
    Originally posted by fdcmiami View Post
    most of what was produced in the seventies was junk anyway. total waste of time and money to buy that unit. put your time and money into equipment and billable hours. forget that piece of junk it belongs in the smithsonian; no i take that back, it needs to be crushed.
    Drive Prius do you?

    Since I was produced in the 70's, in fact about the same year as the corn binder there...dude...go getcha a nice used dodge cummins diesel dually, u pick the year, but I like the 12 valve...either swap the 'Binder onto the Ram, or stuff some decent running gear up under the 'Binder...with heavy disc brakes...then give me a call..I always wanted to lay out flames on a Corn Binder.

    Years back a friend of mine and I dropped a Diamond T cab onto a Loadstar single axle chassis, added Cummins power, a Compressor, Pipeliner,
    Gin poles, and a couple of winches...painted international orange of course...

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Matt_in_Brooklyn View Post
      I have to say, you're asking the wrong guy. For me it's just a hobby, or I should say is going to be a hobby. I have yet to strike my first weld.

      My experience with this would be from the "owner's side" since I work in construction as a project manager in telecom. The few occasions I have had to hire welders it was always word of mouth references. Someone always "knows a guy".

      What I could suggest is look to the large utility companies, specifically your local telephone co. Here in NY it's Verizon. They have a tremendous amount of plant and any welding is always farmed out. They usually have yearly contracts with very small outfits. I was a line foreman and used to deal with a guy that would go around and fix pedestal boxes that were knocked over, come to the garages and fix parts on the trucks, etc. Contact their purchasing group and find out the process.
      Good looking out. Thats some really good info. You always talk to people from the welding side but hardly ever from other sides of the business.
      Miller Trailblazer 302
      Miller Passport Plus
      Miller Spoolmate 100
      Milwaukee 4 1/2" Angle Grinder
      Milwaukee Sawzall
      Miller Elite Inferno Hood
      Miller Diversion 180
      Miller Digital Elite Vintage Hood
      Miller Camo Digital Elite Hood

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      • #33
        Originally posted by c wagner View Post
        Single Rear Wheel as opposed to a Dual Rear Wheel.
        Gross Vehicle Weight Rating and in case you don't know what that means:

        A gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) is the maximum allowable total mass of a road vehicle or trailer when loaded - i.e including the weight of the vehicle itself plus fuel, passengers, cargo, and trailer tongue weight.

        In other words if you build a heavy steel deck on a SRW diesel truck you might be at your GVWR before you even put the welder on and fill it full of tools.
        If you aren't too concerned about it you will be the first time you get pulled into a scale and your running over weight.



        Must be a heavy deck... GVWR for an 07 srw 3500 is 9700 lbs, 9200 for my 2500hd.

        My gasser xclb weighs 6250 lbs with me in it, and tools in the back seat (not with the skid) which leaves about 2950 lbs for the skid/welder.

        The duramax is about 500 lbs heavier, and the allison is about another 100-150 lbs more. So, ~6900-7000 lbs. That leaves 2700 lbs for gear/welder/ skid or deck, driver/basic tools already included.

        Plenty enough for most guys...

        edit... gvwr for an 09 is 9900 lbs now...
        Last edited by Badd00SS; 02-11-2010, 12:52 PM.
        Voigt Precision Welding, Inc.

        Miller Dynasty 200 DX, Miller Syncrowave 250, MillerMatic 252, Hypertherm Powermax 45, Auto Arc Trailpower 8000,272+187 lb Peter Wright anvil, 120 lb Fisher-norris, and more! Buffalo drill press, Grizzly Horiz. Bandsaw, Edwards shear, Barth Shear, bantam mechanical ironworker, Hopkins fly press, Doall Bandsaw, brown and sharpe surface grinder.

        2007 Silverado 2500HD (tow vehicle)
        2000 Camaro SS (Race car)
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        • #34
          Originally posted by Badd00SS View Post
          Must be a heavy deck... GVWR for an 07 srw 3500 is 9700 lbs, 9200 for my 2500hd.

          My gasser xclb weighs 6250 lbs with me in it, and tools in the back seat (not with the skid) which leaves about 2950 lbs for the skid/welder.

          The duramax is about 500 lbs heavier, and the allison is about another 100-150 lbs more. So, ~6900-7000 lbs. That leaves 2700 lbs for gear/welder/ skid or deck, driver/basic tools already included.

          Plenty enough for most guys...

          edit... gvwr for an 09 is 9900 lbs now...
          It was an example of how fast you can burn up your GVWR, I don't personally know of anyone with a 2700lb deck, and that's why, because then you wouldn't be able to add any other cargo.

          So add a 300D Classic at 1354lbs dry (1389lbs with a wire feed module) plus 15 US gal of diesel so add another 100lbs. Suddenly 2700lbs is down to 1246lbs and you haven't added ANYTHING to the truck but the welder. A large oxygen bottle weighs 137lbs, a large acetylene bottle weighs 74lbs, a 20lb propane bottle weighs 25lbs, 250 ft of 2/0 cable weighs 126lbs, 100 ft of torch hose weighs 20lbs.
          So now your 1246lbs is down to 864lbs and you don't have ANY hand tools in the truck, no welding rod, no torch set, no cable or hose reels, no tool boxes, no passenger, no duffel bag with a months worth of cloths and supplies, etc...
          What if you have to take some material to the job site, you can hook up a trailer BUT remember that the tongue weight also comes out of you GVWR. Suddenly that 568lb Trailblazer or 510lb 305G is looking WAY more attractive isn't it???

          I build welding decks and skids for a living, I know more than I care to about the weight issues of trying to stuff 10lbs of stuff in a 5lb bag. SURE your truck can probably handle more weight than the manufacturer lists on the little door tag, but the officer that pulls you over quite frankly doesn't care what you think.

          All I was trying to get across is he needs to look at the door tag and see what the GVWR actually is, then look at how the deck is built, write down some material and do some calculating to see where it is at as it sits, or better yet get it scaled so you know EXACTLY what your at. Then start making a list of what you need to carry and what it weighs, it adds up fast.
          at home:
          2012 325 Trailblazer EFI with Excel power
          2007 302 Trailblazer with the Robin SOLD
          2008 Suitcase 12RC
          Spoolmatic 30A
          WC-24
          2009 Dynasty 200DX
          2000 XMT 304
          2008 Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
          Sold:MM130XP
          Sold:MM 251
          Sold:CST 280

          at work:
          Invision 350MP
          Dynasty 350
          Millermatic 350P
          Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

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          • #35
            We just finished an aluminum deck for a customer, I'm interested to see what it weighs once it is outfitted and ready to work. What I can tell you is that the truck is an '09 Chevy 3500 DRW extended cab Duramax with the Allison auto, a 4" lift, one size larger tires than stock. With a 1/4 tank of fuel a 175lb driver, no truck box or rear bumper it tips the scales at 7275lbs. Being a DRW it has a 11,400lb GVWR, according to the tag on the door. So he has less than 4125lbs left (remember it was only at 1/4 tank).

            It's an all aluminum deck with multiple drawer packs, an extra fuel tank, Pipe Pro, etc. I'll keep you posted once it is finished. It should look pretty good and work even better!
            at home:
            2012 325 Trailblazer EFI with Excel power
            2007 302 Trailblazer with the Robin SOLD
            2008 Suitcase 12RC
            Spoolmatic 30A
            WC-24
            2009 Dynasty 200DX
            2000 XMT 304
            2008 Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
            Sold:MM130XP
            Sold:MM 251
            Sold:CST 280

            at work:
            Invision 350MP
            Dynasty 350
            Millermatic 350P
            Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by c wagner View Post
              It was an example of how fast you can burn up your GVWR, I don't personally know of anyone with a 2700lb deck, and that's why, because then you wouldn't be able to add any other cargo.

              So add a 300D Classic at 1354lbs dry (1389lbs with a wire feed module) plus 15 US gal of diesel so add another 100lbs. Suddenly 2700lbs is down to 1246lbs and you haven't added ANYTHING to the truck but the welder. A large oxygen bottle weighs 137lbs, a large acetylene bottle weighs 74lbs, a 20lb propane bottle weighs 25lbs, 250 ft of 2/0 cable weighs 126lbs, 100 ft of torch hose weighs 20lbs.
              So now your 1246lbs is down to 864lbs and you don't have ANY hand tools in the truck, no welding rod, no torch set, no cable or hose reels, no tool boxes, no passenger, no duffel bag with a months worth of cloths and supplies, etc...
              What if you have to take some material to the job site, you can hook up a trailer BUT remember that the tongue weight also comes out of you GVWR. Suddenly that 568lb Trailblazer or 510lb 305G is looking WAY more attractive isn't it???

              I build welding decks and skids for a living, I know more than I care to about the weight issues of trying to stuff 10lbs of stuff in a 5lb bag. SURE your truck can probably handle more weight than the manufacturer lists on the little door tag, but the officer that pulls you over quite frankly doesn't care what you think.

              All I was trying to get across is he needs to look at the door tag and see what the GVWR actually is, then look at how the deck is built, write down some material and do some calculating to see where it is at as it sits, or better yet get it scaled so you know EXACTLY what your at. Then start making a list of what you need to carry and what it weighs, it adds up fast.

              easy there tiger...... No need to get snippy... I guess you didnt get my sarcasm, my apologies. I was just stating that they still can hold a decent amount of cargo....And I never talked of overloading, thats just wreckless.
              Voigt Precision Welding, Inc.

              Miller Dynasty 200 DX, Miller Syncrowave 250, MillerMatic 252, Hypertherm Powermax 45, Auto Arc Trailpower 8000,272+187 lb Peter Wright anvil, 120 lb Fisher-norris, and more! Buffalo drill press, Grizzly Horiz. Bandsaw, Edwards shear, Barth Shear, bantam mechanical ironworker, Hopkins fly press, Doall Bandsaw, brown and sharpe surface grinder.

              2007 Silverado 2500HD (tow vehicle)
              2000 Camaro SS (Race car)
              sigpic

              Comment

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