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what is change made of

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  • what is change made of

    i need to weld a screw to the back of a 50 cent piece. what is a 1976 50 cent piece made of? can it be tig welded? i could take a quarter and try it with some nickle wire i guess, but if i ruin it ill be out another 25 cents for this job thanks chris

  • #2
    Modern coins are mostly copper with a silver coating. Some older coins are more silver than copper. I don't think tig welding it with steel filler will work; you'll just ruin it Try silver soldering it.
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    • #3
      per http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/...CircHalfDollar:

      Specifications:
      Composition:Cupro-Nickel: 8.33% Ni, Balance Cu
      Weight:11.340 g
      Diameter:1.205 in., 30.61 mm
      Thickness:2.15 mm

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      • #4
        A 1976 half dollar is 91.7% copper and 8.3% nickel by weight.

        The core is copper with a cladding of copper-nickel.

        If you get it up to welding temperature, the coin is going shed the cladding.

        You might get away with 56% silver brazing. But more than likely, you'll damage the face (I assume you want the face to appear intact otherwise you'd use something else).

        Looks like you beat me to it, bluejay.
        Last edited by Bodybagger; 12-01-2009, 10:26 PM.

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        • #5
          super glue
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          • #6
            JB Weld it (2-part epoxy).
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            • #7
              Lots of super glue. Back in high school someone superglued a quarter to the concret hand rail, by the time I finished a few years later there was a ring dug in the concrete around it, but the quarter was still there.
              "The only source of knowledge is experience." Albert Einstein

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              • #8
                My dad used to make belt buckles out of 50 cent pieces and stainless tubing and pipe. He would tig the tubing inside the pipe in whatever pattern he was going for and then cut it and mount the coin to the cross section. He always epoxyed the coin to it and then polished the whole thing.

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                • #9
                  Cayager,

                  You can tig steel to US nickels, quarters and half dollars if they are the cupro-nickel alloy.

                  I tigged a few nickels together using 308 tig wire and it held.

                  Look at www.johnnyswing.com and see the wonderful chairs and sofas he has made using coins.

                  And yes - it is legal to use US coinage for artistic purposes even if this involves welding them.

                  Silver solder wil also work if you are quick.

                  Good luck
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                  • #10
                    I have seen coins silver soldered in jewelery making, not sure what the alloy is in the jewelers stuff we were using.

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                    • #11
                      What is change made of

                      Hey look into Tigging with some silcone bronce
                      Vernon

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                      • #12
                        I once saw MacGyver use a nickle to weld a connecting rod together, he used a battery charger as the power source. I'm fairly certain that isn't going to help you in any way, but it IS just my first post .

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                        • #13
                          flashback

                          Originally posted by tiggit View Post
                          I once saw MacGyver use a nickle to weld a connecting rod together, he used a battery charger as the power source. I'm fairly certain that isn't going to help you in any way, but it IS just my first post .
                          Now that is a name I haven't heard in years. MacGyver. LOL!! Good show though.
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