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TIG welding thin materials

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  • TIG welding thin materials

    Hi Everyone,,,I'm new to the forum and welding in general I guess. I've been doing OK on most things but find when it comes to TIG welding thin materials (especially SS) I have minimal success. Does anyone have any tips on setup or settings that might help me out . Thanks in advance

  • #2
    Welcome to the forums. First off. What machine are you using? How thin is the material? Do you have pics? There is a weld calculator on this site for the question you ask.
    Dynasty 200 DX runner
    Sync 350 LX
    XMT 300 w/D74 and roughnecks
    Hobart 135
    ESAB PowerCut 875 plasma

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    • #3
      Hi : I'm using the Dynasty 200 and the material I'm trying to weld is about .015
      thick. Im trying to either corner weld or butt weld mostly. The on-line calculator has been really useful and helpful for most applications but this seems not to fall in the ranges given. I think this is not your everyday type of weld. I work in a University and am required to sometimes weld very small or thin types of materials.

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      • #4
        thin stainless

        with thin stainless, you need a really good fit up-metal to metal. I generally try to fuse the pieces together , without filler rod. Use very low amps(15-20A) and a very sharp 1/16 dia. tungsten. You will need to purge the backside or it will sugar badly. You have a great machine for the job. Good luck and let us know how you did.
        Jim

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        • #5
          That's pretty thin! Outside corner welds that thin are hard to get a puddle started even with a tight fit-up. As azmac54 said, you should back purge if the backside is important also (like sanitary, or pressurized parts). I would use at least a .040 tungsten though. The amount of amps it takes to strike an arc with a 1/16 tungsten can burn that .015 thick material up fast. An .020 tungsten would be the best, but is very hard to deal with IMO.
          Dynasty 200 DX runner
          Sync 350 LX
          XMT 300 w/D74 and roughnecks
          Hobart 135
          ESAB PowerCut 875 plasma

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          • #6
            Wrench,
            I agree with you a 1/16 tungsten is too big. I've used .040 on thicker material than that. I'd use an .020 if you can find them. As to getting the puddle started perhaps some .023 stainless MIG wire would do the trick. I use MIG wire all the time on thin stainless. I recently welded a 1/4" stainless pipe coupling to a very thin stainless radaitor cap it was perhaps .025 thick where I welded it to and used the .040 for that job along with .030 stainless MIG wire for filler, it was a right angle (t type joint) fit.
            Blondie (Owner C & S Automotive)

            Colt the original point & click interface!

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            • #7
              Welcome to the forum.

              You may already know but if not the Dynasty 200DX has a spot weld feature.
              Set up is in the manual page 32 and it will refere you back to section 6 G to access it. This is for the new manual.

              I tried it once just to check it out and it worked well. May not be any use to you right now but I can't wait to try it on a project where its needed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hardrock40 View Post
                Welcome to the forum.

                You may already know but if not the Dynasty 200DX has a spot weld feature.
                Set up is in the manual page 32 and it will refere you back to section 6 G to access it. This is for the new manual.

                I tried it once just to check it out and it worked well. May not be any use to you right now but I can't wait to try it on a project where its needed.
                I like the spot weld feature! It takes a little time to set-up just right, but if you have alot of tacking to do...
                Dynasty 200 DX runner
                Sync 350 LX
                XMT 300 w/D74 and roughnecks
                Hobart 135
                ESAB PowerCut 875 plasma

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                • #9
                  Tig thin Mat.

                  Sound like some one is welding beer cans WOW thats thin Mat. You wasn't kidding about thin mat. Best of luck, To thin 4 me.
                  Vernon

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                  • #10
                    I was at the US Nationals many years ago, I saw I guy in the pits welding beer cans together ( Stacked up, Top rim, to rim )

                    There were about 200 people standing around watching ( DROOLING all over themselves)

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                    • #11
                      Thanks everyone for your input. I'll be giving that a try sometime today and will post my results. I can already feel the perspiration beads forming on my forehead just thinking about it.

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                      • #12
                        Don't forget the Dynasty 200 dx has a hidden menu and you can adjust those starting amps down for very thin material. As was already recomended use .020 Tung. Maybe incorparate a chill bar as a gas back up.

                        wcedesigns.com

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                        • #13
                          It takes some doing to weld the thin stuff thats for sure!
                          I tig (autogenous) fuse the material, its .020 edge seams, two pieces of .020 that are welded on the edge. I use 16 amps to do this, I also use pulse and .040 tungsten, about 10 cfh on the argon and a number 4 to 6 cup on the torch and about a shade 8 on the helmet.
                          I have butt welded two pieces of the .020 with filler, I used .023 mig wire, there is no time to figure out what you need to do next (too hot) etc, so quick wits are a big plus!
                          .020 tungsten works best but is too fragile for me.
                          I use the .040 and pulse to keep the point in good shape on the tungsten.
                          Pulse is 500 cycles, 50 percent 20 percent background and the setting on the amps is 26. These settings keep the tungsten point in good shape much longer than regular DC for me.
                          These parts are steel, so I imagine it would be somewhat easier doing stainless.
                          I have done over 500 of these welds and it comes easier for me now but doing one once in awhile I wouldnt be able to do it very well as a lot of practice is needed.
                          I also use the Dynasty 200 dx- nice machine!
                          I purged the backside on a butt type weld, on the edge welds I dont have to.
                          I have pics if you like but they are steel and not polished, it may not be similar to what you need to do.
                          I have done the .062 304 ss tubing for years, its a piece of cake to the thin stuff thats for sure!

                          I hope some of this drivel will help you out a bit........
                          Last edited by popspipes; 12-02-2009, 08:59 AM. Reason: spelling
                          mike sr

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                          • #14
                            Hi ,, What do you mean when you say to use a chill bar as a gas backup? I'm not familiar with what that means. Thanks

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                            • #15
                              I would use a solid peice of copper or brass even alu clamped tight against the back side of the part mill a little grove for the weld in the block . Clamp it and tape it up purge 3 to 5 cfm of argon gas in and weld it up.That way you get gas on the back side and a heat sink to absorb some heat. Dont foget to change that start amperage. Factory default for DC is 25 amps thats more than enough to waste your part! Hope this helps you its hard to explain typing .

                              wcedesigns.com

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