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  • Syncrowave 200 vs. Dynasty 200dx

    I’m having trouble deciding between the dynasty200 dx and the syncrowave 200. Portability is nice but the cost difference is too much. I want to weld very thin metals and want the pulse feature as well. If I built a cart with larger wheels or small tires, could the syncrowave be wheeled from a tool shed across the dirt to a welding location until i build my shop where it won't be moved much? I also am wondering about air cooled vs. water cooled. I usually weld for several hours a day on my projects currently by torch or arc welder, so would I burn up a air cooled torch?

    Any help would be appreciated
    Thanks

  • #2
    As an owner of a SW200 , I'll offer my opinion .

    The SW and the Dyn. are really very different machines ( obviously ) .
    Where the Dyn is portable , the SW is not . It's a solid 200lbs+ and attempting to roll it across a dirt driveway would be simply painful . Not recommended or fun to do at all .

    Welding performance ? On DC , both are terrific machines when used within their recommended parameters . Yes , there are the inverter vs transformer arc differences , but , both are superb . Very hard to fault either as the person using the machine will likely make more of a difference than the machine itself .
    The real difference is when you tig on AC . This is where the Dyn really steps ahead in a big way . Adjustable frequency , wave form shapes and a sophisticated pulse really set the Dyn apart from traditional transformer machines . Will the SW weld aluminum on AC ? Sure of course . But not with the same ease and sophistication as the Dyn .

    Which one to buy ? Cost , portability and Tig performance on AC are the things to consider .
    I really like my SW200 , but if had the money , I would have bought the Dyn 200DX in a heartbeat .
    Miller MM252 with Bernard Q300
    Hypertherm PM30

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by fl2934208 View Post
      I’m having trouble deciding between the dynasty200 dx and the syncrowave 200. Portability is nice but the cost difference is too much. I want to weld very thin metals and want the pulse feature as well. If I built a cart with larger wheels or small tires, could the syncrowave be wheeled from a tool shed across the dirt to a welding location until i build my shop where it won't be moved much? I also am wondering about air cooled vs. water cooled. I usually weld for several hours a day on my projects currently by torch or arc welder, so would I burn up a air cooled torch?

      Any help would be appreciated
      Thanks
      The DX is going to be the preferred machine between the two choices, if it were me.

      The Syncrowave is going to be a very heavy machine and will not roll across a dirt surface unless you build the cart using 8 to 10 inch pneumatic tires.

      The drawback to a DX is the higher cost of course.

      If you are welding mainly thin material you should not need a water cooled torch, as the welding current will be on the low side.
      pg
      Dynasty 200 DX_set up on 3 phase
      Coolmate 3
      MM 251 w/ Spoolmatic 30A
      HTP 625 Micro Cut Plasma Cutter
      Victor O/A Rig
      Bridgeport Mill_3 phase (w/ Acu-Rite 4 axis DRO)
      10 inch South Bend Lathe_3 phase
      Baldor Double Cup Tool Grinder_3 phase
      Baldor 10 inch Buffer
      Rockwell 12 inch Disc Sander
      Cyclone 2ft X 3ft Bead Blast Cabinet
      Quincy 325 2stg- Air Compressor_3 phase
      Graymills Built-in Parts Washer
      Rockwell/Delta Planer, HD Shaper, Uni-Saw etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think something should be said for durability. Where I work we purchase the dynasty 300 and now the 350. These are excellent machines but would I buy them for my own business, the answer is no, they have too much down time.
        I have seen too many electronic failures with the inverter based machines and this scares me. As a small business owner I can't afford to have my one main welding machine in the shop without a replacement while it's being fixed. The older style transformer machines seldom have any problems, even after 20 years they keep going and going in my experience.
        If you need the portability or are doing alot of fine aluminum work or have power limitations at your shop then I would go for the 200dx, otherwise I'll always go with the transformer based machine for durability.
        Jim

        Comment


        • #5
          These Inverters require little maintenance but they do require it, and a little preventative maintenance is all that is required for the most part.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by cruizer View Post
            These Inverters require little maintenance but they do require it, and a little preventative maintenance is all that is required for the most part.
            I am all ears...I am quite sure you have told all this before, but I for one would love to here it again. All that I can think of at the moment is "what should I be doing that is preventative, and what is it preventing?"

            www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
            Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
            MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
            Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
            Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

            Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
            Miller 30-A Spoolgun
            Miller WC-115-A
            Miller Spectrum 300
            Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
            Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

            Comment


            • #7
              I think that the durability concern is a valid one . I was having this same discussion with my local authorized repair center several months ago , and the shop owner voiced the same opinion . He said that in his experience , he sees the inverter machines in for repairs "routinely" . The transformer machines ? Rarely if ever . He said that he cannot complain as most shops have converted over to the inverters now and his business is better than ever The LWS ( which is a very large distributor for both Miller and Lincoln ) said the exact same thing . The inverters are a much nicer welding machine , but , they are not perfect as far as durability goes . Not like the older tech SW's .
              Miller MM252 with Bernard Q300
              Hypertherm PM30

              Comment


              • #8
                I think the reason more of the inverters have trouble is they are easily PORTABLE. I don't see many transformer machines slung over a shoulder, or picked-up and set down as much as the inverters. It sounds good anyway
                Dynasty 200 DX runner
                Sync 350 LX
                XMT 300 w/D74 and roughnecks
                Hobart 135
                ESAB PowerCut 875 plasma

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have had my sw200 for almost 2 years. Just picked up my dynasty 200dx tonight. Have them both in the garage now. I used the dynasty for 3 minsute and I'm hooked. Doesn't interfere with my parents tv or phone lines, its portable. I tested out the aluminum frequencies and using the pointed tungsten and it was awesome.

                  Can't wait to do my first project with it.

                  My syncrowave 200 is now for sale if anyone in BC is interested.
                  Millermatic 175, Dynasty 200dx
                  Hypertherm Powermax 45/Torchmate 2x2 CNC
                  G0704 CNC Milling machine

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    thanks

                    thanks for everyones input.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'd like to know what preventative maintenance is needed on the inverters too. All I see inside them is bunch of circuit boards, no moving parts. Other than blowing the dust out once in a while, I don't see anything in there to 'maintenance' ???

                      If there are any specific things to look after on any of my inverters, I'd like to know.

                      XMT 304 CC/CV
                      Millermatic Passport
                      Thermal Arc 185 ACDC
                      Millermatic 350P

                      As far as the torch question, for a shop machine, the water cooled torch is by far the best choice. An air cooled torch works fine for field work and is more convenient than water cooled when toting the machine around.

                      As far as Dynasty vs Syncrowave, Dynasty would be my personal choice but the Sync is still a great machine. If I were to go with a Sync, it would definately be bigger than the 200 since cost is not so much a factor with the transformers as it is with the inverters. HUGE difference in price between a Dynasty 200 and 350, not quite as much price difference between a Sync 200 and 350. If you're going to get a big shop machine, may as well get a BIG one.
                      Last edited by Desertrider33; 12-03-2009, 01:55 AM.
                      Millermatic350P/Python, MillermaticReach/Q300
                      Millermatic175
                      MillermaticPassport/Q300
                      HTP MIG200
                      PowCon 300SM, MK Cobramatic
                      ThermalArc 185ACDC, Dynaflux Tig'r, CK-20
                      DialarcHF, Radiator-1
                      Hypertherm PowerMax 380
                      Purox oxy/ace
                      Jackson EQC
                      -F350 CrewCab 4x4
                      -LoadNGo utility bed
                      -Bobcat 250NT
                      -PassportPlus/Q300
                      -XMT304/Optima/Spoolmatic15A
                      -Suitcase8RC/Q400
                      -Suitcase12RC/Q300
                      -Smith oxy/propane
                      -Jackson EQC

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You have to open it up once a year to make sure that the top boards haven't pulled out of the mother boards ,and retorque the mod screws. If you move around the DX from site to site, you really should remove the plastic primary strain relief and go with a sleeved metal version. This plastic fingered strain has been a leading cause of premature machine failure for us.

                        The Cat rental store was having a heck of a time with thier fleet, from machines going out not working to machines constantly breaking down. Through a little of my own restructuring for them, a little technical training and In the last 8 months not one machine has broken down in the field.

                        We've had to convert rental fleets of these and other units including the XMT's when the route cause of the failures was located. From 60% new machine failure rate to near zero in all rental fleets that we take care of.

                        On the XMT's, 300/350 Dynastys, PipePro 304, ect, and Hybrid machines, you have to retorque the interconnect board screws once a year cause they all back off eventually causing an expensive failure.

                        Now telling you this actually costs the repair shops money, as you seldom have to go there for repairs. It's cost us money, tracing the route causes and reporting it. But hey, I have more time on this site.
                        Last edited by cruizer; 12-03-2009, 03:28 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And thats why some of the previous posted said that the Local repair shop is making money on those firms with the inverters. The firm repairing them isn't telling the companies whats going on, as the route cause for those failures may not be found, as it's much more cost effective and financially pleasing to replace the components without ever knowing what indeed happened.

                          Very first thing I do on a service call is take apart the input plug (If its a non standard molded plug) You can be guarenteed that the primary wires are loose especially in the twist plugs. Then I check for power, again I'd say that at least 50% of the machines in the 200 - 230 Vac range are wired for the incorrect power. Then a couple more basic checks BEFORE I even get into the machine in question. Often its just a switch or parameter problem, yet someone's gone and taken all the covers off the machine thinking its something major.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank you for posting up those maintenance items, Cruizer. The info is much appreciated.
                            Millermatic350P/Python, MillermaticReach/Q300
                            Millermatic175
                            MillermaticPassport/Q300
                            HTP MIG200
                            PowCon 300SM, MK Cobramatic
                            ThermalArc 185ACDC, Dynaflux Tig'r, CK-20
                            DialarcHF, Radiator-1
                            Hypertherm PowerMax 380
                            Purox oxy/ace
                            Jackson EQC
                            -F350 CrewCab 4x4
                            -LoadNGo utility bed
                            -Bobcat 250NT
                            -PassportPlus/Q300
                            -XMT304/Optima/Spoolmatic15A
                            -Suitcase8RC/Q400
                            -Suitcase12RC/Q300
                            -Smith oxy/propane
                            -Jackson EQC

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mustang View Post
                              As an owner of a SW200 , I'll offer my opinion .

                              The SW and the Dyn. are really very different machines ( obviously ) .
                              Where the Dyn is portable , the SW is not . It's a solid 200lbs+ and attempting to roll it across a dirt driveway would be simply painful . Not recommended or fun to do at all .

                              Welding performance ? On DC , both are terrific machines when used within their recommended parameters . Yes , there are the inverter vs transformer arc differences , but , both are superb . Very hard to fault either as the person using the machine will likely make more of a difference than the machine itself .
                              The real difference is when you tig on AC . This is where the Dyn really steps ahead in a big way . Adjustable frequency , wave form shapes and a sophisticated pulse really set the Dyn apart from traditional transformer machines . Will the SW weld aluminum on AC ? Sure of course . But not with the same ease and sophistication as the Dyn .

                              Which one to buy ? Cost , portability and Tig performance on AC are the things to consider .
                              I really like my SW200 , but if had the money , I would have bought the Dyn 200DX in a heartbeat .
                              my feelings exactly
                              Matt

                              Syncrowave 200
                              Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
                              Victor O/A
                              Smithy Midas 1220 Lathe- Mill
                              Bandsaw- 20 yr old Harbor Freight type
                              Speedglas

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