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Spectrum 375 X-Treme with an Ingersoll 4.4 cfm

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  • MMW
    replied
    Just got back from Tractor Supply. While I was there I checked out the compressors in person. After internet shopping I was mostly sold on the Campbell Hausfeld 60 gallon upright unit for $399 but after seeing the CH sitting next to an IR 60 gallon ($599) in person I would go with the IR. Everything from the motor, compressor head & the fittings seems way better quality. Even when you tap on the tank there is a noticable difference in thickness. I will definitely spend the extra $200 when I buy one in the near future.

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  • Larwyn
    replied
    For some reason mine seems to work fine. Guess I'm just lucky.

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  • davedarragh
    replied
    Compressor Requirements

    As a general rule, when determining compressor size, multiply the plasma's CFM input requirements by 1 1/2. It's not so much the PSI the compressor creates, but the amount of CFM delivery volume. Anything smaller will provide unsatisfactory results.

    Dave

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  • MMW
    replied
    Also Home Depot has a very similar one at $399 with the same scfm but again a different #. It is # VT6314 but is labeled "Husky" which is a house brand. But the # says it is a Campbell Hausfeld.

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  • MMW
    replied
    I'm currently looking at a Campbell Hausfeld #VT6275 which is at Lowes for $399, 10.2 scfm @ 90 psi & also a Campbell Hausfeld #VT6355 which is at Tractor Supply for $399, 10.2 scfm @ 90 psi. Tractor Supply currently has a 10% off coupon till 11/22. I can't seem to find the difference between the two models though. The pics look the same. I guess I have to go see them in person.

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  • MMW
    replied
    For the extra money get the bigger one. You won't be sorry.

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  • pballdan11
    replied
    Well I've been researching two compressors, one is a 20 gal, the other a 60 gal. the 60 is not much more, however I would have to wire up another 220 V in my garage...

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w..._158284_158284

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...5221_200375221

    I wanted something rated for continous duty as well as oil lubed. I don't trust the teflon seals, but are there any others this size on the market that have performed well for you all?
    Last edited by pballdan11; 11-18-2009, 06:23 AM.

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  • Tryagn5
    replied
    Compressor size...

    Just another thought any compressor below 8cfm/90psi does not run air tools such as da's, die grinders, polishers very well. Will be a lot of waiting, to me any compressor below this isare only good for light work, or intermittent work.
    Kevin

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  • Larwyn
    replied
    Correction; Due to the fact that I got thirsty, and the fact that the Husky air compressor is right next to the beer fridge out in the garage, I just noticed that the decal on the compressor says 5.8 scfm at 90 psi, not 5.5, and the tank is only 26 gallons not 30. Sorry for the misinformation earlier...........

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  • Larwyn
    replied
    I use 2 different compressors with my Spectrum 375 Extreme. One is a Husky with a 30 gallon tank rated at 5.5 scfm at 90 psi, the other is a 4.5 gallon DeWalt rated at 5.2 scfm at 90 psi. I have been more than happy with the performance of my plasma cutter using either of these two compressors. But, I have never used it with a larger compressor so do not know how much difference that would make. I've only used it with the DeWalt on a jobsite cutting cutting a lot of 16 gauge and 1/8" stuff. I've gotten excellent cuts in 1/4" mild steel using the Husky compressor in my garage/shop. So far my experience indicates that Miller's advertised air requirements for this plasma cutter are realistic.

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  • nfinch86
    replied
    Originally posted by Desertrider33 View Post
    Still just barely enough air. You really need at least 10 cfm to use the plasma anywhere near it's potential. 15 cfm is ideal. Any more than that is gravy.
    Desert;
    I agree with you, mine is 28gal. with 5.7 cfm. @ 90psi. !
    I get by just fine, but a few more cfm. @ 90psi. would be nice !

    .............. Norm :

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  • Desertrider33
    replied
    Originally posted by pballdan11 View Post
    Thanks for all the help! I think that I will return the small ingersoll and trade up to the 20 gallon thats rated for 5.2 cfm at 90psi and 4.6 at 135. Does this sound adequate? Its the garage mate, model number P1.5IU-A9. The also sell a horizontal unit which is rated at [email protected], but it costs around 300 more...
    Still just barely enough air. You really need at least 10 cfm to use the plasma anywhere near it's potential. 15 cfm is ideal. Any more than that is gravy.

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  • JSFAB
    replied
    Remember, compressors are rated at CFM at specified pressure. As the pressure at the compressor drops, CFM goes up.

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  • pballdan11
    replied
    Thanks for all the help! I think that I will return the small ingersoll and trade up to the 20 gallon thats rated for 5.2 cfm at 90psi and 4.6 at 135. Does this sound adequate? Its the garage mate, model number P1.5IU-A9. The also sell a horizontal unit which is rated at [email protected], but it costs around 300 more...

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  • nfinch86
    replied
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
    Norm,

    If you check page 13 (Section 4-6) of your operator's manual, you'll see that Miller is quite clear about input air pressure. To quote, "Use clean, dry air with 90-120 psi pressure".

    The "internally regulated" pressure on the 375 is 60 psi. If you feed it 60 psi air, you'll never get max efficiency from the unit.
    OK; Sundown, You are correct !120psi. at the compressor, 60psi. dialed down at the Plasma Cutter !

    .............. Norm

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